1. Watch Guides

  2. Watch Guide to Different Types of Watch Materials

    Watch Guide to Different Types of Watch Materials

    A lot comes to mind when considering a new timepiece. Like what the price or style, but watch materials should also be right up there on the list. So what should your watch be made of? Well, let’s delve into this watch guide for distinct types of watch materials that go into making high-quality watches.  Watch Materials Stainless Steel for Lasting Durability If you’re looking for a watch, you’ll likely be browsing a bunch of steel models, as stainless steel is the most used material in watches today. One big reason for its popularity is durability, as stainless steel has a serious ability to resist corrosion. It’s lightweight and more affordable than gold. Stainless steel eclipsed when it came into wide use at the dawn of the 1930s. With polished or brushed finishes, stainless steel watches do have slight downsides. They can scratch and dent more easily than some other more-durable materials. But stainless steel is still plenty tough! A popular material for dive watches, stainless steel is found in some of the most legendary timepieces designed for undersea exploration. While the Rolex GMT Master II and the Rolex Daytona are both popular stainless steel offerings, the Rolex Submariner is particularly tied to stainless steel as it owes its heritage to the Rolex Perpetual Oyster, the world’s first hermetically sealed steel watch. From the Omega Speedmaster on the high end to more-affordable selections such as the Seiko Prospex, stainless steel dive watches are things of beauty that literally stand the test of time. Gold and its Many Mixers These days when on the hunt for a stylish gold watch you can choose from white, yellow, and rose gold. What’s the difference? Well, white gold looks a lot like steel because pure yellow gold is mixed with steel or the silvery-white metal palladium, as well as possibly zinc or nickel. It’s not hard to tell Rose Gold at first sight, as the copper that gets mixed with the Yellow Gold gives it a rosy hue. On the plus side, you get a warm and elegant coloring that goes great with dress watches. But there’s the negative in that Rose Gold can scratch and dent more easily than other alloys. Yellow Gold, as you can probably guess, has a traditional golden color that’s a common sight with luxury watches. But it’s usually not pure gold, as 24 karat gold is too soft to make a durable watch. So it’s mixed with copper, much like Rose Gold. The difference is in the copper content, as the more copper you put into the mix the more red, or rose, coloring emerges. The number of options for high-end gold watches can be dizzying, from the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Chronograph to the Rolex Oyster Perpetual Day-Date or the Omega Speedmaster 57 and on and on and on. If you’re looking for something affordable, you can consider steel watches with gold plating’s. Tissot, Seiko, and Invicta are great brands to look to if you’re in the market for an affordable watch that gleams in gold. Titanium for Twice the Toughness This lightweight alloy came onto the scene in the early 1970s. That’s when many thought the days of stainless steel were numbered. Titanium has nearly two times the strength of stainless steel and half the weight. It’s also highly resistant to corrosion. Perfect, right? Well, sort of. Titanium is also more expensive than steel and, perhaps most importantly, its duller finish just doesn’t gleam like stainless steel. Titanium settled into an esteemed spot in the watch world as a go-to material for dive and similar tool watches. The Citizen Promaster Diver is a great example of a fine titanium dive watch, as is the Tudor Pelagos with a titanium case that’s water-resistant to 500 meters. Some other great titanium timepieces include the TAG Heuer Formula 1, the PVD-coated Hamilton Khaki Field Titanium Auto, and the Seiko Presage SARX055, an atypical titanium dress watch. Buy TAG Heuer Formula 1 Watches   Watch Materials, An Ancient Art Goes Modern with Ceramic While it may seem strange, ceramic watches are made of exactly what they sound like they are hardened clay. It’s the same technique that’s been used in making pottery for centuries. With some help from today’s modern science to create super-durable compositions of zirconium oxide. But despite its long history, ceramic is a relative newcomer with watches. It didn’t really go mainstream until the debut of the IWC Da Vinci Ceramic in 1986. Before that, Omega had dabbled with ceramics in the early 80s for the special-order Seamaster Cermet. And even earlier, the Rado DiaStar broke ground in the early 60s with its tungsten carbide ceramic case. But it wasn’t until IWC hit the market with its zirconium oxide case that we got the kind of material that’s used in today’s ceramic cases.

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  3. Closer Look at the Rolex Explorer II

    Closer Look at the Rolex Explorer II

    Designed for discovering far-off lands, the Rolex Explorer II has been gracing the wrists of adventure seekers for decades. It’s also a refined watch that wears well for dress-casual occasions. Let’s take a closer look at this iconic timepiece. Rolex Explorer II Started in the 70s 1971 to be exact. That was the year Rolex decided that the Explorer needed a bigger brother and rolled out a larger version. The Explorer II made its debut with a 39mm stainless steel case and a complementing steel bracelet. As for the “explorer” part, it was made for adventurers with a 24-hour hand pointing to a fixed bezel. It  offered military time to explorers who might not be able to readily tell the difference between AM and PM in a dark situation such as caving. A generous application of lume adds to its use in low-light situations. The first Rolex Explorer IIs have also earned the dubious nickname of “Steve McQueen’s’’ because the late actor was said to have worn one. But we’re not so sure about that, as there are no photographs with him wearing one and McQueen was famously partial to both the Rolex Submariner and the Heuer Monaco. Still, the name survives. All About the White Dial Buy White Watches The white-dial versions we saw debut in 1984 are hands-down the most popular Rolex Explorer IIs, back then and today. The early white-dial models were produced from 1984 to 1989. They are highly sought after by collectors — and mainly for a slight defect! The white paint on the first incarnations fades more than it should, turning the dial to an ivory-cream color that watch enthusiasts simply love. In the 80s we also saw change with the addition of red paint and a small triangle to the 24-hour hand. Today that hand pops with vibrant orange and is a signature grace note to the elegant watch. The Polar Explorer Arrives All Rolex aficionados know the nickname. The unofficial title of “Polar Explorer” was given to the reference 16570 versions that premiered in 1989. We then saw the addition of round hour markers with black outlines to create a striking black-and-white motif that remains in production today. The reference 16570 remained in production for 22 years after its debut. And while the white dial is what catches the attention of most, a closer look at the face reveals true luxury. The hour markers are made from 18-carat gold! So tarnishing will never be a problem with these precious metals. Buy Rolex Explorer II Watches Forged with Oyster Steel That “Oyster Perpetual‘’ name that’s emblazoned on its face is more than just branding. Rolex prides itself on crafting timepieces that can stand up to extreme conditions and that’s ever so clear in its Oystersteel cases. More often found in high-stress uses such as aerospace applications, high-grade 904L steel is used in an alloy that Rolex specifically developed in-house. The result is an ultra-tough alloy that resists corrosion and can take one serious beating while still polishing to a fine finish. And not just the case. The Oyster bracelet is equally durable with the same fine finish and Rolex’s exclusive Oysterlock clasp to guard against the possibility of the bracelet slipping by accident. Rolex’s propriety bracelet system also allows the wearer to adjust its length by around 5mm to ensure a comfortable fit. A True Swiss Chronometer Like all Rolex watches, the Rolex Explorer II passes the stringent tests of the Swiss Official Chronometer Testing Institute for certification. Many Swiss watches, even from luxury brands, can’t say the same. Inside the Rolex Explorer II you’ll find the self-winding mechanical calibre 3187 movement. It has a Parachrom hairspring that offers a high degree of precision. The Explorer II is built to take on extreme environments. There are Paraflex shock absorbers to prevent any damage from the bumps one might encounter while out exploring. A Favorite of the Rich and Famous He may have taken a step back from his royal duties, but Prince Harry will never give up his Explorer II. He was first spotted wearing a classic white-dial Reference 16570 while serving in the British Army. Since then, he has carried the timepiece into civilian life. Action star Jason Statham loves to go vintage with his “Steve McQueen” Explorer II. So does Lord of the Rings and Pirates of the Caribbean star Orlando Bloom. His vintage Rolex Explorer II has a history. It was stolen from his home by the infamous “Bling Ring” burglars. But later retrieved and, quite possibly, on Bloom’s wrist right now. Buy Rolex Watches And we saw an Rolex Explorer II backstage at this year’s Oscars ceremony. Rolex designed the Greenroom where the celebs await to take the stage. They embedded an Explorer II in a table at the center of the exclusive space. Rolex Explorer II Conclusion Maybe you’re an explorer and are on the lookout for that perfect watch to ascent to the top of Mount Everest. More likely, the most exploring you’ve done lately is checking out the new wine bar in town. From extreme environments to elegant evenings, you can’t go wrong with a classic Rolex Explorer II.

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  4. An Introduction to Mido Watches

    An Introduction to Mido Watches

    Have you heard of Mido watches? If you haven’t, you’re not alone. Even though the Swiss watchmakers have a long history that began at the watchmaking center of the world, they’re often overlooked. Especially in the United States. Well, let’s do our part to change that and introduce you to Mido watches. Mido Watches Started Over a Century Ago Founded in Biel/Bienne, Switzerland in 1918, Mido debuted with unique colorful dials that embodied the Art Deco style that was all the rage in Paris at the time. The automobile came into vogue in the 1930s and Mido was right there with designs that embraced high-end car culture. When the 20th century took flight in masse in the 1940s, Mido shifted to aviation and produced innovative chronographs. Spanish for “I measure,” Mido has always prided itself on precision. As the desire for dive watches surged in the 1960s, Mido dove in with its iconic water-resistant single shell case on the Mido Ocean Star. The seafaring tradition continues to this day with their Commander collection. In the 80s Mido got sporty, with tennis legend Björn Borg as their brand ambassador, and in the 90s they got global with the World timer, a groundbreaking analog watch that tracks time zones across the planet. And during the 21st century? Well, they’ve continued to produce luxury watches in all of the areas they’ve mastered over the decades. The Mido Collections: An Overview With over a century of heritage, it’s hard to narrow them down. But let’s look at some of the most popular, and most beloved, Midos on the market today. Mido Watches Multifort Collection Drawing design inspiration from the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Multifort Collection comes under the banner “force and strength.” With scalloped lugs and rounded crowns, Multifort offerings also take design cues from Mido’s timepieces of the 1930s and 40s. The vintage homage is most notable in the Multifort Patrimony, offering mid-20th-century aesthetics in a round 40mm case. And a curious function from another century. On the edge of the dial, you’ll find a pulsometer scale. While nearly unheard of today, these stopwatch-like functions were once commonly used by doctors to take pulses. Buy Mido Multifort Watches Mido Watches Baroncelli Collection Housing some of the most elegant timepieces Mido has to offer, the Baroncelli Collection goes for sophistication with Baroque neoclassical leanings that draw inspiration from the landmark Galleria Vittorio Emanuel II building in Milan, Italy. Timepieces in this line that debuted in 2016 are made with an eye on both male and female watch lovers. Some models in the Baroncelli Collection go full-on classical, such as the Reference M86002218 with angular rose-gold hands, distinctive Roman numerals, and a slim round case that looks exquisite on a fine brown alligator strap. Others opt for more minimalist designs, like the Baroncelli III Automatic with slim silver-tone hands, and the bare minimum of index and hour markers on the snow-white face. On a black leather strap, it presents the epitome of monochrome sophistication. Buy Mido Baroncelli Watches Mido Watches Commander Collection Created in 1959, and originally part of the Ocean Star series, the Commander Collection hasn’t seen drastic design changes in the ensuing decades. The timepieces in this collection still draw inspiration from the Eiffel Tower. Though we still see lots of variation in the collection. For simple elegance look to the Commander II Automatic Silver Dial, with a silver dial enclosed in a round stainless steel case that meets a silver metal wristband. We contrast that minimalist offering with the Commander Automatic chronograph, with three subdials on its silver face. The stainless steel case is plated with rose-gold, making the watch wear well with a black alligator strap. Buy Mido Commander Watches Mido Watches Belluna Collection Belluna’s architectural inspiration comes from the Italianate style of London’s Victorian-era Royal Albert Hall. Notable entries under the Belluna banner are the Sunray models. As you may have guessed, they feature sunray dials. They also feature Caliber 80 automatic movement with up to 80 hours of reserve power. As they’re dress watches with classic looks, put a Sunray on a black or brown leather strap and you’re ready for an elegant night of culture with London’s finest. Mido Watches Ocean Star Collection When Mido watches looked for design cues for the Ocean Star Collection, they followed a beacon of light to the Gibraltar Lighthouse and created a line that captures the seafaring spirit. At the esteemed head of that spirit is the Ocean Star Captain. It is impeccable in black and gold, with rose-gold hands and hour markers over an analog black dial. With a screw-down crown, it’s water-resistant up to 200 meters. It has a mix of elegance and rugged assuredness on a sturdy rubber strap. The Ocean Star Captain V finds a better fit with a stainless steel link bracelet. Buy Mido Ocean Star Watches Mido Watches Conclusion Maybe not all of this was new to you. Maybe you own a Mido and are well versed in their history and heritage. But for many more of us, we have over a century’s worth of catching up to do when it comes to Mido watches.

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  5. 6 Innovative Features to Look for In Modern Watches

    6 Innovative Features to Look for In Modern Watches

    When you’re looking at new watches to purchase it can be all too easy to select your pick based on appearance alone. And nobody would blame you because watches are gorgeous. Are you looking for something classic or are you more interested in modern watches? But watches have evolved from being simple time tellers and bold fashion statements. Modern watches of today are filled with features and some of them truly reflect the innovative nature of the horological industry. While not all these features are considered useful by the everyday wearer, they are groundbreaking innovations that deserve mentioning. Perhaps you’ll find one of them worthwhile on your next watch. Without further ado, here are some innovative features to look for in modern watches. Watch Out for These 6 Features 1: Power Reserve Indicator Many modern watches feature a power reserve indicator which, in layman’s terms, displays the remaining amount of energy stored in the watch. Think of this feature in the same way you think of your vehicle’s petrol gauge. Just as your petrol gauge lets you know when it’s time to fill up the tank, a power reserve indicator will let you know when it’s time to replace the battery or wind the system. 2: Chronograph Functionality On top of its time-displaying capabilities, chronograph watches facilitate timekeeping. The face of a chronograph watch will display seconds, minutes and hours. The built-in stopwatch functionality is a feature that can be used in various applications. Most people use chronograph watches to time races. But other uses include monitoring cooking times, tracking billable hours, timing meetings and more. Some of the most renowned chronograph watches include the OMEGA Speedmaster Professional collection, TAG Heuer Monaco collection, and the Rolex Daytona collection. 3: World Time Most modern watches are able to display more than one time zone at once, but only a world time watch can tell you the time across all 24 time zones at a glance. Because this feature can often result in a complicated, cluttered-looking face only serious globetrotters opt for watches with world time functionality. World time watches display two time zones at once and allow the wearer to track the time across all zones. This feature is especially handy for purposes ranging from adjusting time displays due to traveling to new time zones to figuring out when is a good time to call your friend who lives overseas. 4: Calendar In addition to telling the time, some watches double as a calendar displaying the day, date and month. Perpetual calendar watches can even indicate leap years! Annual calendar watches are the most popular type of calendar watches as they display all the date information you need. Annual calendar watches need to be manually set once a year, while perpetual calendar watches don’t. Because the calendar feature is such a handy tool, many modern watches include this feature. A prime example of an annual calendar watch is the IWC Portugieser Annual Calendar Automatic watch. The best of the best in perpetual calendar watches is the Patek Phillipe Grand Complications Perpetual Calendar watch.  Interestingly enough, the first ever annual calendar wristwatch was patented by Patek Phillipe in 1996. 5: Moon Phase While the days of using the phases of the moon as a calendar are long gone, moon phase watches still have a special place in the world. A moon phase watch displays the moon’s current phase as it is in the sky at that very moment. As opposed to merely telling the time a watch that displays moon phases gives you an insight into the inner workings of the universe. Moon phase watches aren’t mainstream watches that adorn the wrists of just anyone. Rather they are worn by artists, sky-watchers, fishermen and those who appreciate the marvel that is moon phase watches. 6: Atomic Timekeeping Not many modern watches have atomic timekeeping capabilities because the feature is not that sought after by consumers. It might not be popular, but it is innovative! The appeal of atomic timekeeping is that it keeps the most accurate time on the planet thanks to radio-controlled synchronization. There is no need to manually set or adjust the time or date on an atomic watch because it does so automatically. It’s done via low frequency radio signals emitted from atomic clocks such as the one found in Colorado. A prime example of a watch boasting atomic timekeeping capabilities in the Casio GW-9400J-1JF. Casio G-Shock Modern Watches Final Thoughts A watch needs to be more than a pretty face and the features we mentioned turn time-telling devices into technological wonders. So tell us, when you shop for your next watch—will you be filtering by feature?

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  6. A Closer Look at the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Watch

    A Closer Look at the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Watch

    For nearly 90 years the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso has made an indelible face-flipping impact on the watch world. It’s been spotted on the wrists of A-list stars, on-screen and off, such as Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, and Christian Bale. It has spawned a series of similar designs from the likes of Hamilton, Vacheron Constantin, and Movado. But none of the imitators have ever risen to the level of the original. So let’s take a closer look at what makes the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso so special, and some of the models that have helped land it an esteemed spot in watchmaking history. Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Made for War… Sort of No, the Reverso isn’t a field watch. It actually isn’t even close, by today’s standards or back when military watches were invented, with what amounts to steel cages over their faces. But the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso was made for soldiers who occupied a foreign land. Let’s zip back in time to 1931. Britain maintained colonial control over India with its military might. But it was a time of relative peace, and the British soldiers spent much of their time playing polo. While there weren’t bombs and mortars, their watches still got banged up out on the field. Jaeger-LeCoultre came up with a solution, a watch that flipped over so that the case back was exposed to protect against any rough-and-tumble action the polo grounds could dish out. Word spread and soon the watch was the toast of Europe, spotted on the wrists of Britain’s King Edward VIII and international aviation celeb Amelia Earhart. Personalization was one key to the Reverso’s success, as anyone could engrave anything, they wish on the case back and turn it into a one-of-a-kind showpiece. The following decades saw ebbs and flows, with the watch’s popularity rising and falling with the whims of fashion. After a run of over 30 years, production ceased. A Fine Watch Gets Funky Then the 70s arrived and things got, well, kind of far out, man. People grew their hair wild and outfits got even wilder. It was the perfect time for Italian watch dealer Giorgio Corvo to scoop up 200 Reverso cases he happened to notice on a visit to the Jaeger-LeCoultre factory in Switzerland. Back in Italy, he retrofitted movements, and the watch made its slow climb back en vogue. In 1982, with some convincing from Corvo, Jaeger-LeCoultre resurrected the watch and put it back into production. It hasn’t ceased since. A Look at Some Legendary Reversos Reverso Grande Date Bigger than your average Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso, the Grande Date still doesn’t wear noticeably hefty, coming in at 46.5mm x 27mm. The stainless steel hand-wound watch has a whopping eight-day power reserve, gauged by an indicator on its no-nonsense dial. But what’s most impressive is its simplicity, an elegant entry in the line with few complications, just a large date window, small seconds hand, and understated Arabic numerals. In stainless steel on a fine brown alligator strap, this subdued beauty is ready for any affair that calls for a sophisticated air. Reverso Tribute Gyrotourbillon If you really like skeletonized watches, you ́ll love the Tribute Gyrotourbillon. On the front, you ́ll find an upper white textured dial with dauphine hands that effortlessly hovers over an intricate field of gears, while below at the six o ́clock position there’s a likewise floating tourbillon. Flip it over and there’s yet another time display, this time over a fully skeletonized dial. Either face you choose puts a wonderfully complicated display of inner workings on your wrist. Reverso Tribute Calendar In pink gold, the look of this charming piece might be a bit on the dainty side for some. But for those who revel in its grace notes love it all the more for its soft side. And it’s got a practical side as well. You can track two different time zones on its front and back faces, the latter offering a night and day indicator as well. And it’s a moonphase watch! Track lunar movement with a bosom-style indicator that shows a graphic representation of the moon as it looks at any moment in the night sky. Perfect for both men and women, this versatile dress watch oozes refinement with design elements that recall the 1931 original. Reverso Tribute Duoface A striking timepiece with a blue-and-silver motif, the Tribute Duoface goes for a 3D vibe with its dual-hued appliquéd hour markers. It also has got a serious Art Deco lean with a stainless steel case that follows contours we first met in the 1930s. The grainy dial complements a similar leather strap, which was specially designed by famed Argentinian bootmaker Casa Fagliano. Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Classic Duoface As its name suggests, this model is a classic in every sense. This is a dress watch that positively asks to get taken out to a black-tie affair. It’s already dressed to impress for the part. A black grained dial stands in sleek contrast to gleaming silver hands. On a black alligator strap, this watch is sophistication personified, with a few handy features. Flip it over and you can track a second time zone on its reverse face. Are you ready to throw things into reverse? Why not think of it as getting two watches for the price of one and pick up an amazing Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso.

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  7. Why the Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch So Popular

    Why the Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch So Popular

    Watches have always been a popular choice among people with an exquisite and refined sense of style. A good watch can boost one’s personality by a great margin in a way that makes it look like the star of the show. Who doesn’t like a good watch that exceeds in its styling, technicality, and impressive mechanics? Behold, the Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch is a remarkable timepiece that transcends barriers of time and space in the literal sense. Not only exhibiting excellence in design, but this notable chronograph is the watch that has become immensely popular as ‘The first watch on the Moon.’ Story Behind the Fame Omega SA is not the only brand that showcases remarkable timepieces’ collections. The Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch has been a part of all six lunar missions. It is the watch that has come from outer space emerging as the most iconic masterpieces in their Omega Speedmaster collection. Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch has witnessed the first man landing on the Moon. Ever since then it has been a major part of all lunar missions since that time. The Speedmaster is an upholder of strength, endurance, and outstanding framework. This watch has an obvious reason to be a favorite among many others. The Speedmaster remains to be a favorite timepiece approved by NASA for spaceflight. It is still the only one qualified for EVA. Its unparalleled fame and popularity started by being a part of NASA’s space missions to survive unpredictable conditions in space. Following a series of qualification tests, Wally Schirra wore a CK 2998 on the Mercury-Atlas 8 mission from where the walk of fame began for the Speedmaster. This chronograph manifested its top-quality and robustness. It survived all testing for high and low temperatures, humidity, oxygen, low and high pressures. As well as vibrations, shock, and acoustic noise, thus emerging as a favorite of NASA. Later, NASA equipped its astronauts with the Speedmaster watches in the Gemini 3 mission. However, it was the famous mission of Apollo 11 was the actual historical moment. That is when the Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch witnessed its first trip to the Moon. It was then that the watch gained great admiration and fame as ‘The First Watch Worn on the Moon.’ Testing of the Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch Omega has proven to be the most skilled timepiece manufacturers. They leave all other watch companies far behind in the race of bearing extreme conditions according to NASA testing. The Speedmaster collection is proven to withstand all extremities of temperature ranging from 160-200°F till 0°F. It also bears temperature cycling in a vacuum. Humidity and oxygen availability can be unknown in different regions of outer space too. This is why the Omega Speedmaster has been tested for resistivity to relative humidity of 95% and 100% oxygen saturation at 0.35atm. NASA makes sure not to leave any stone unturned in watch testing. The timepiece survives shock from different directions. From liner acceleration from 1 to 7.25 g, and vibrations from 5 to 2000 Hz. Pressure fluctuations were also looked at closely from extremely low pressures. As 10−6 atm to pressures as high as 1.6 atm for different length of time spans, all of which were unaffected on the watch. Features of Speedmaster The Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch promises such elegance and grandeur in its designing that brings out the best customizations in the timepiece. The Speedmaster collection features the back casing of every watch emblazoned with the name of the space mission that the watch is renowned for. This special recognition makes the Omega watches acknowledged world-wide. The Speedmaster Moonwatch is chic in appearance featuring an appealing combination of jet black and silvery steel color. The dial has polished silver hands and hour markers that maximize its appearance. It comes with a second’s sub-dial, 30 minutes recorder, and a 12-hour recorder as well. The black bezel houses a matching bracelet also built of stainless steel. Moreover, it has a mechanical winding movement and a 5-year warranty. This timepiece comes with a special box containing a NATO strap. Which is a special strap for astronauts to wear on their space missions. It’s a tool for altering the watch’s bracelet according to one’s preference and a book showcasing the adventures of the Speedmaster’s space odyssey. Conclusion A major plus point that makes the Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch exceptional is that it has the back casing engraved: The First Watch Worn on the Moon. This watch has become be a top preference for every space lover who dreams of visiting the Moon. The Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch has made it possible to carry the presence of outer space in your very hands.

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  8. How to Use a GMT Watch

    How to Use a GMT Watch

    Thinking about getting a GMT watch but like to know a little more about them before you make the purchase? Well, let’s take a look at these intriguing timepieces that track separate time zones. You’ve probably heard of the famed Rolex GMT-Master and GMT-Master II. You probably know that GMT means Greenwich Mean Time. And you also probably know that GMT has something to do with a time-zone line somewhere in England. For many of us, that’s the extent of our knowledge of GMT (and we’re fine with that!). But, then again, there are these things called GMT watches and they are, well, kind of awesome. They’re not hard to figure out and pretty useful when you do get a handle on how they function. How Does GMT Work? Well, basically, the watch has an extra hand that points to Greenwich Mean Time. At least that’s where we start as a reference. But rather than the 12-hour rotations of most regular hour hands on watches, the GMT hand references 24-hour markers. So, in other words, the GMT hand goes around once a day independent of the watch’s usual hour and seconds hands. The GMT watch hand is often an arrow, often colored red, and varying in shape from the regular hands to avoid any confusion. It sounds simple enough! But Then There’s the Bezel Adding to functionality (or confusion depending on your point of view), a rotating bezel can be used to track another time zone. How? Well, imagine you are in Greenwich, England. The tea is strong, the Yorkshire pudding flaky, it’s midnight and the GMT hand points to zero on your bezel. You’re taking a flight to New York City, where its five hours earlier. Click your bezel clockwise five marks and you’re now tracking time in the Big Apple. As all the world’s time zones use Greenwich as a reference, you can do this with any location. So You’re Not a Jetsetter? No, probably not. If you’re like most of us you’re not on and off planes all the time, constantly needing to reset to local time. You have a job, a family, a life and they don’t usually include red-eye flights to far-flung corners of the world. So how does a GMT watch help you then? If you work remotely with people from across the world, if your company has a satellite office on another coast, chances are it’s a good idea to have an awareness of time in other places. A GMT watch is an easy maintenance-free way to always have other time zones in your consciousness. Got far-away family? It’s a good idea to know you’re not calling them during dinner time. Got a deadline, an hour in which work has to be done? Just set the GMT hand however much time you have left back from zero and when that hand points straight up your time is also up. How Does it Work for You? So we’ve looked at the what, the functions, the uses, the overall usability. Now let’s consider the why. Why would you consider buying a GMT watch and how would you wear it in practicality? For the prestige. Owning a watch that easily tracks different time zones isn’t just about usefulness. And heck, chances are you’re going to check time zone info on your phone as soon as you land and pass through free airport WiFi on the way to baggage claim. But the GMT watch says something about you. It proudly proclaims to all that you are a citizen of the world, you have knowledge of, and experience in, parts across the globe. You may be at home right now, but your watch has one eye on the local time in London and the other ready to calculate touch-down time in Shanghai. Because it’s not your phone! Yes, we know you probably won’t pass up the chance to use your phone as a watch, passing WiFi in the airport or any other hotspots for that matter. That doesn’t make it right. Or at least the best way to go about things. Just about anyone can (and does) pull out their phone for info, soon lost in the ever-enticing digital landscape, goading you to check that message, consider those likes, respond to every text no matter how banal. Now contrast that with a cool quick glance at your exquisite watch. You’ll notice the difference in how you feel, and others will take note of your sophisticated move as well. For the style. Watch aficionados will go on and on (and rightly so) about watch movements. And when it comes to a GMT watch, they’ll totally geek out on its functions. But for most of us, watches are style statements. We focus on shape, dial colors, straps (Dressy leather? Go commando with NATO? All-biz bracelet?). You choose a fine GMT watch because of how it looks, because it complements the way you dress, because it’s a piece that exemplifies how you see yourself. And, in turn, how the world sees you. Leave the gears to the geeks, you want something cool on your wrist. GMT Watch Conclusion So whether you’re a frequent business traveler or more of a cubicle creature, from checking the stock market bell to checking in on grandma, maybe a GMT watch is the right way for you to track multiple spots with one glance at your watch.

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  9. How to Store Watches When Not in Use

    How to Store Watches When Not in Use

    Did you inherit an exquisite pocket watch or treat yourself to that Rolex you’ve always wanted? Perhaps you have an extensive collection of watches, both old and new. Whether it’s one watch or a few dozen, it’s important that you provide proper storage for your treasured timepieces. How do you store watches when not wearing them? Storing your watches correctly will ensure that they will keep their value. It will also allow you to pass them on in turn to your children. How to store watches when not in use A fine watch requires proper maintenance and care in order to keep it working properly and retain its beauty and value. You’ll want to keep your watch clean and stored carefully when you’re not wearing it. Invest in safe storage for your watches Watches are subject to scratches and other “wear and tear” damage not generally covered under warranties. They’re also a tempting target for thieves. Therefore, keep your watch collection in either a safe or a safety deposit box. A temperature-controlled safe will also protect your watches from damaging humidity and dust. Cleaning your fine watches before storing them when not in use Humidity and dust can play havoc with the finely-tuned mechanisms of a watch. So, too, can skin oil and other oil-based products like lotions. That’s why you’ll want to clean your watch each time you take it off. If you keep your cleaning supplies near your watch safe, cleaning your watches will soon become second nature. If your watch is waterproof, use a soft cloth and lukewarm water to clean it. Gently use a soft, moistened child’s toothbrush or toothpick to reach difficult spots. Rinse carefully and use a microfiber glass wipe to polish the crystal. Avoid getting water on a leather strap. For vintage watches, or those that you aren’t sure are waterproof, avoid the water! Watchmaker Kalle Slaap recommends using real chamois to clean everything, including the crystal. Keeping your watches lubricated and wound Keeping your watched lubricated and wound are important to storing watches when not in use. Watchmakers are divided about whether or not watches need to be kept running or not. However, one thing they agree on is that it’s vital that they are kept properly lubricated. The movement of a watch is its engine, and like any good engine, it needs proper lubrication to keep it running well. Always remove the battery from a quartz watch if you aren’t going to wear it for a while. If your watch has several complications like a perpetual calendar, moon phase, or planetarium, use a high-quality watch winder. Master-watchmaker Andrea van Steijn recommends choosing “One that doesn’t rotate too fast and doesn’t make too many rotations.” Have your watches serviced regularly It’s important to keep a watch’s mechanism clean, properly lubricated, and tuned-up in order to keep it working properly whether you are wearing it or storing it when not in use. Choose a reputable watchmaker endorsed by the watch brand. Watches that are worn frequently will need servicing more often, especially if they are more complex. However, every watch will need regular servicing even if it’s just to clean and lubricate it. Keep your valuable documentation safe The paperwork and accessories that come with a watch will take up little room in a safe. Since they add tremendously to the resale value of a watch, they’re well worth storing securely. Organize the proofs of purchase, warranty cards, authenticity certificates, hang tags, and manuals in separate, labeled zip bags (one for each watch). Do the same with accessories like bracelets, extra links, and straps. Add color-indicating silica desiccant packets to each zip bag and place more in the safe. They’ll absorb damaging humidity and can be recharged or replaced when they change color. Because of their bulk, you might want to store your watch boxes somewhere else. Just make sure they stay clean and dry. Add the desiccant packets and keep careful track of which box goes with which watch. Insure your valuable watches! Whether you are constantly wearing the watch or storing it when not in use, you should insure your valuable watches. Depending on its value, your watch collection may be covered under your homeowner’s insurance policy or you may need a separate insurance rider just for it. Document the value of each watch you own and always have vintage or rare watches appraised. Take several clear, close-up, date/time stamped photos of each watch from different angles to show its condition. Then take a group photo of the watch and everything that goes with it, including the box, all documents, accessories, etc. You might also want to take separate photos of each of those items. Having a label that you can place in each photo will help you keep everything straight about what goes with which watch. Keep the photos, receipts, and a list of serial numbers in a separate, safe location. If something should happen to your watches, you don’t want to lose all of your proof of ownership and value with them! Adding to your watch collection When you are ready to add another fine watch to your collection, browse Watchshopping.com’s exceptional selection. Each of the watches we sell has passed our rigorous authenticity certification and is covered for 1-5 years (depending on the watch) by our in-house warranty. You are sure to enjoy any watch you purchase from one of the world’s most trusted online purveyors of fine watches!

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  10. Rolex Yacht-Master Close Up

    Rolex Yacht-Master Close Up

    Both the Rolex Yacht-Master and its successor the Rolex Yacht-Master II have captured the untamed spirit of the sea and the imaginations of watch lovers across the globe. Let’s take a deep dive into what makes these exclusive timepieces such enduring successes. First, a look back. Not too far. We just need to ease the time-machine shifter into reverse for a quick trip back to 1992. Bill Clinton was elected U.S. President; Wayne’s World was a box-office smash and a little-known band named Nirvana swerved the music scene away from 80s hair bands to something called “grunge.” It was in this same year that Rolex dropped the very first Yacht-Master. Rolex Needed a New Groove The watch was a big deal at the time (as it is today). Rolex hadn’t much altered the design of its Sea-Dweller, the Yacht-Master’s nautical-themed predecessor, in more than two decades. Unsurprisingly, the shift came along when Patrick Heiniger took the helm of the company from his father. The new boss was intent on making some changes that would keep Rolex current. So the best parts of their tried-and-true Submariners and Rolex Daytona’s were combined with a few new cutting-edge design elements and the Yacht-Master was born. The first model, offered in the Oyster Perpetual line, was somewhat similar to the Submariner with 3135 movement. But it had an 18 karat gold case, etched bezel inserts, large indices and hands, and, perhaps most fittingly, was water-resistant up to 100 meters. At 40mm, this freshman Yacht-Master was big, bold and an instant success. Just two years later Rolex scaled back the Yacht-Master’s size with a 35mm edition for men with slimmer wrists and a 29mm offering aimed at women, along with an updated version of the 40mm watch. These new editions featured striking blue sunray dials that would go on to be regarded as hallmarks in the line. As we neared the end of the 20th century Rolex looked to change with the times. And change was in the air in 1999. Maybe it was Y2K fears, maybe because the global population passed six billion or possibly because Ricky Martin was daring us to start “Livin’ la Vida Loca.” We may never know what inspired Rolex to move from gold to a new mix of platinum and steel called “Rolesium.” We do know it was a somewhat controversial move, with both lovers and detractors of the rare-metal mix. Yacht-Master Spawns a Sequel 2007 was a big year for sequels (and threequels!). Hollywood gave us Hostel 2, Spider-Man 3, Rush Hour 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean’s 13 and Halloween 9. So it seems only fitting that Rolex would drop the Yacht-Master ii amid this retread mania. The watch was (and is!) bold in many ways, from its hefty 44mm size to its striking blue bezel, set against the meeting of two metals known as “Rolesor,” mixing steel with yellow and white gold. It’s an eye-catching combo that’s made the timepiece instantly recognizable and a favorite of watch aficionados worldwide. Today’s Yacht-Masters run the gamut of variations. Go dressy with a link bracelet or sporty with a rubber strap. Dials span from midnight black and slate grey to powder white and shimmering bronze. Feel like bringing some bling with diamond accents? No problem, Rolex has a Yacht-Master for that too! These variations, the Yacht-Master’s timeless elegance, and the quality of fine Swiss watchmaking have put the timepiece in the spotlight and on some seriously trendy wrists. Celebrities Sport the Yacht-Masters Ellen DeGeneres. Demonstrating that big luxe watches aren’t just for men, Ellen has been spotted wearing an 18k Everose gold Yacht-Master. Her classic model has a Cerachrom bezel, matte black dial and she likes the watch best on a sporty black rubber strap. Conor McGregor. Never shy about flashing some seriously nice watches, UFC champ McGregor’s go-to Yacht-Master ii is a brazen 44mm yellow-gold model with that ever-popular Ring Command bezel in vibrant blue. David Beckham. You can say the same for David Beckham and his yellow-gold Yacht-Master ii. But McGregor and Beckham don’t really have the same watch. With Rolex’s unique use of natural materials, none of their signature mother-of-pearl dials is exactly the same. Mark Wahlberg. The movie star takes a different tact with his 40mm Yacht-Master in Everose Rolesor with a mix of Oystersteel and rose gold. While the precious metals give it a dressed-up feel, the cool chocolate dial creates a more casual vibe that makes the watch quite versatile. Roger Federer. Of course, the “James Bond” of tennis keeps things cool and sophisticated with his Yacht-Master ii, a Rolesium model with a rotatable platinum bezel and an 18k white gold case. You may not be a tennis star, movie star or have the ability to take down a UFC fighter with a roundhouse kick (or maybe you do). Either way, you can still sport some star style with a nautical lean by slipping on a fine Rolex Yacht-Master.

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  11. A Closer Look at the TAG Heuer Formula 1

    A Closer Look at the TAG Heuer Formula 1

    Formula 1 and watches are a professional combination. When talking about these two together, one big name appears, again and again, that is Heuer or most professionally, TAG Heuer. Techniques d’Avant Garde (TAG) took over the ownership of Heuer in 1986. That’s when they released their very first TAG Heuer Formula 1. The most fantastic event in the Formula 1 racing calendar is the Grand Prix in Monaco. It was announced that TAG Heuer is the official timekeeper of the event. Overview The TAG Heuer Formula 1 is a very glamorous timepiece. The case of the TAG Heuer Formula 1 comes in different sizes and sizes. The case is very finely brushed, giving the feel of luxury. Some of the TAG Heuer Formula 1 watches can be found in green and red, which represents TAG Heuer’s brand. The display can show TAG Heuer printed in white and Formula 1 printed in red, right beneath it. The watch has a sporty look and is an excellent choice for racers. The watch does not remain downright athletic; the brand remains a signature of class. The most attractive part poses little to zero problems in terms of visibility and legibility as the hands and indices display good quality contrast against the black background. For example, you’re in a dark-themed party, and the room is not that lit, the luminous indicators would still prove to display time. The TAG Heuer Formula 1 has a scratch-resistant glass for the rough users of its type. The steel strap is suitable for formal occasion uses. Meanwhile, the rugged rubber strap is suited for off-duty days. Display The bezel of a TAG Heuer Formula 1 has a unidirectional turning, and it is finely brushed just like the rest of the steel case. These unbelievable features assist the Tag Heuer Formula 1, too, has fantastic water resistance, measuring up to 200m deep. TAG Heuer watches are known for their glamorous dials. Therefore, the TAG Heuer Formula 1 has a sober dial style with some simplistic details. The watch avoids any unnecessary noise. There are luminescent indexes with rhodium plating in the dial of the watch. Plus, there are variations of the Formula 1 that offers a smaller bezel on the dial that features a graduated minute scale with intervals of five minutes in white. Ultimately, there is a date display at the 3 o’clock position. The clockface is of clean sapphire crystal that displays the tiniest details of the TAG Heuer Formula 1. The Movement The mesmerizing Swiss-made Quartz movement is featured in the Tag Heuer Formula 1. The watch has the most modest and simple functions of hours, minutes, seconds, and date. The best part about TAG Heuer Formula 1 is that it features an EOL (battery end-of-life indication), fast date correction, and stop-second unlike other TAG Heuer watches. The quartz movement of the watch uses a battery and a quartz crystal to power. The watchmakers call this ‘oscillation’ in which the battery produces current and sends it to the quartz crystal. The crystal then creates a vibration to power up the watch. There is a checkered flag pattern that covers most of the steel back. Apart from the wide structure of the watch, the case also has a reasonable depth of 15.2mm, which supports the mechanical motion of the TAG Heuer Formula 1. The Bracelet The strap of the TAG Heuer Formula 1 comes with two options, which are steel and rubber. The bracelet features amazing artistry; the polished and brushed steel details give it a mesmerizing look. The watch is very lightweight, and it grasps on your wrist very firmly. The look of the watch is very athletic and not bulky at all with its high-grade watch case. However, the rubber strap does not give a better look than the steel strap. What do we suggest? The TAG Heuer Formula 1 revives the spirit of motorsports and racing. The collection surprises with many variants. The three chronograph counters and a date display come with an addition of GMT-display and an alarm function. The structure and the design of the TAG Heuer Formula 1 make this variant of TAG Heuer a professional and durable choice for racers and motorsports fans. The elegant creation represents the excellence of TAG Heuer. The sporty look and TAG’s prestigious production and manufacturing capabilities remain genuinely unchallenged. Verdict Altogether, if you are looking for a smart and rugged wristwatch at a reasonable cost, you may consider the TAG Heuer Formula 1. This variant of the TAG Heuer has an upgraded collection with the top models consisting of the exceptional Carrera, Link, and Aquaracer. The rubber strap range of TAG Heuer hasn’t always been with a lot of options. But with the release of the Formula 1 series and nylon materiel straps offered in the Aquaracers has its own aesthetics. Therefore, a battery-powered watch is a convenient option.

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