1. Watch Guides

  2. Watch Guide: Answers to Common Hublot Watch Questions

    Watch Guide: Answers to Common Hublot Watch Questions

    Known for taking the Chrono world by storm with the release of the first watch with a rubber bracelet, Hublot watches pack a punch despite coming from humble beginnings. The company started out rather late in the year 1980, but it’s been active ever since then. Having said all of this, you must have Hublot watch questions if you’ve stuck around through the hype so far! So, what we’ve done is compile the most popular questions that we have found about Hublot. They include some from other watch enthusiasts that we know. And we’ve answered them all. 1: Are Hublot watches battery-operated? Like most luxury brands, Hublot watches have a few quartz models of popular lines like Classic Fusion. Nonetheless, the brand itself is still majorly a maker of automatic watches (self-winding from the user’s kinetics). From there, we can say the automatic watches are the better in terms of investment due to the high demands. But if you’re only interested in watches with considerable performance, the battery-operated watches are your next bet. View this post on Instagram Sharing is caring. Tag a friend who would love to wear these timepieces this summer. A post shared by Hublot (@hublot) on Aug 1, 2018 at 11:06pm PDT 2: Can Hublot watches substitute as investments? Here, the question of whether or not Hublot watches are well made comes up. To answer that, the obvious route to take is to make a comparison with a watch manufacturer like Rolex or Patek Philippe. In any of those two Giants, they make all their parts down to the heart itself, the movements in-house. This means a large labor force filled with gemologists, scientists, and engineers to manufacture and even improve all of these parts. As a result of all this, watches made by Rolex and Patek Philippe are gratified as two of the best you can buy in terms of sophistication and style. If you ask the question of whether or not the two (Rolex and Patel Philippe) can be considered good investments, this is their individual positive answer. Sadly, the same thing can’t be said about Hublot. Many watch aficionados (including us) share a spoken/well-debated argument that Hublots lack the level of craftsmanship shown by those two. Not because of lack of money, but because of a lack of innovative designs. Facts that back up this reasoning is that Hublot unveiled their first major in-house movement, the UNICO in 2010, while Rolex introduced its own in-house movement in 2000. With these points made, now consider the fact that Hublot watches are expensive and this may not be what you were hoping to hear. Still, it’s far better to know now. Especially if you were planning on investing in a few Hublot timepieces. *Note: Another perspective is that most watch enthusiasts know of these facts which seriously affects the resale value. 3: Will Hublot watches keep up with fashion in time? Watches are objects that are lauded for their long-term use. They are also items that people expect to have perfect scores in both looks and performance. With the former, you’ll have to accept that ‘Looks’ essentially means how good they’ll look on your wrist. And the answer to that is a bold ‘Yes.’ Hublot timepieces will keep up with fashion trends due to their circular bezels. If the brand has ever been known for anything, it’s the fact that they make some of the most fashionable watches that money can buy. Kind of like Tudor, they experiment with the parts that make up their watches. One that we can note down is ‘Magic Gold’—Hublot’s favorite and secret ingredient. The material is a mixture of gold and ceramics. After which, the result of the mix is a pseudo-metal with the best characteristics of the parent ingredients. 4: How to authenticate Hublot Big Bang watches? It’s one of their most popular collections so we think it’s safe to assume that you might be reading this because of the watch. If not, you can still apply this to literally any of their watches. If you want to authenticate a Hublot Big Bang watch, one quick process is to check the date display. The left edge of the box should be curved, but if that part isn’t satisfied, the number (date) itself must be centered at the very least. Follow up by checking if the watch uses an H-screw. If the watch is still around at this point, finalize your evaluation by making sure all the tags/names like “Hublot” or “Hublot Geneve” are engraved. *Note: None of these checks are fool-proof. The only guaranteed method is to buy from a reputable store. Our Final Thoughts We used our knowledge and experience so far with the company to answer all of the questions above. So, they’re completely unbiased and will act as a guide for any decision relating to Hublot.

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  3. Tudor Watches: Common Tudor Watch Questions

    Tudor Watches: Common Tudor Watch Questions

    Tudor watches, despite its relationship with Rolex, isn’t as well-known as a Rolex watch. This, of course, doesn’t mean people do not love the brand for its repertoire of exquisite timepieces at budget-friendly prices. But that point is moot to some others who are new and also looking for a brand worth investing. As a result, we thought why not build a list of common questions people have when first introduced to the brand! We had them too at one point in time, and that kind of gives us a front row seat to what you need. Having said that, think of this post as an introductory class that’s practically made for beginners. What is the difference between Tudor watches and Rolex watches? The difference, so to speak, isn’t singular. Tudor heavily departs from the Rolex norms through two things: the movement and the style itself. Tudor Watches Movements When most wearers consider a watch distributed by Tudor, they only see the price. This is understandable, given the fact that Tudor watches look similar to the ones found in Rolex’s collections. In fact, they even use the same bracelet, case, and dial. So, it’s like a Rolex but instead with the Tudor symbol proudly displayed. Nonetheless, what few or even many, may not know is that a Tudor watch’s movement plays a large part in the reduction in price. Yes, Tudor watches are less expensive, but that’s because they either use a Swiss made ETA or a Valjoux movement. Inside a Rolex, you’ll find a movement made in-house by the Head Honcho’s watchmakers. Tudor Watches Styles When it concerns a versus game of aesthetic appeal between Tudor and Rolex, we think that depends on what you like. Tudor favors the use of bright and luminous colors and titanium bracelets and cases. The former is ideal for the younger market, while the latter is useful for the diving watches. On the other hand, Rolex literally mutes most of their colors, hence the reason they always look simple and sophisticated. Likewise, Rolex doesn’t target the younger market. What’s the name of the first chronograph made by Tudor watches? The name of Tudor’s first is the Oysterdate chronograph and it was released in 1970. The chronograph used a Valjoux mechanical caliber 7734. Or in other words, the movement wasn’t made in-house. Are Tudor watches a good investment? Yes, they are—but you have to be careful about which one you’re going for. If you’re thinking of buying one of their vintage pieces, the current trend is evidence enough that people will always love them. Tudor watches at one time had an uncanny resemblance to Rolex ones. So, people have developed a taste so deep, they’ll still choose the vintage options many years down the line. On the other hand, people who love the idea of investing in watches generally avoid ones that are not old. How to recognize fake Tudor watches? Before you move on to the tips, it should be noted that the tricks we’ll be highlighting aren’t foolproof. But they should help you decide shady deals from clean ones, like this guide should help spot fake Rolex watches. If you look below the 6 o’clock position, you’ll see a 5-digit number which stands for the watch’s serial number. Above the 12 o’clock mark, you’ll find another 5-digit number which stands for the registration number. Try checking the watch’s luminous paint. On a real Tudor watch, the luminous paint is evenly painted and thus, it evenly shines in the dark. On a counterfeit, it’s pretty normal to notice the edges or tiny spots being dull. “Original Oyster Case by Rolex Geneva” is what you should see on the case back of a Tudor timepiece. If that’s not there, then the case back should be completely blank. Which to choose between Tudor watches and Rolex watches? Albeit that question isn’t ours to answer since we aren’t the one wearing the watches, we’ve already sparked up the conversation. Choosing between Rolex depends on whether or not you prefer value for your money or you want something both expensive and valuable (a usual combo that Rolex have mastered over the years). The first naturally goes to Tudor models while the second condition is unnaturally satisfied by Rolex models. Who are Tudor watches made for? Ordinarily, Tudor’s watches are made for everyone with an interest. But if you ask any Tudor watch lover, one of their favorite lines from the company will be the Tudor Black Bay. The range represents their capabilities and more importantly, their intentions as a company of watchmakers. Nevertheless, we’ve digressed enough. As the name probably sounds, the Tudor Black Bay line of watches is entirely tailored to be worn by divers. Heck, the brand goes further by owning an audience in the form of the infamous or maybe famous (really depends on who’s asking who) US Navy, French Navy, and even the extreme professionals, the US SEALS. Our Final Thoughts on Tudor Watches After going through all of these things, you should know by now that buying a Tudor means you’re practically getting a Rolex. So, with that being said, Tudor is a brand that deliver watches that perform excellently, boast of simple yet beautiful looks, and come at amazing prices. Essentially, they’re luxury watches without the usual eyebrow-raising price tags.

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  4. Watch Guide: Common Q&As About Seiko Watches

    Watch Guide: Common Q&As About Seiko Watches

    There are a lot of questions on Seiko watches as a brand. And why not, seeing as they mix simplicity, class, performance, and a perfect price into all of their products. So now, we’ve compiled answers to some of the most obscure questions that you can ask. “Practical solutions and reliability through simplicity” is a comment that we found, and it totally sums up all the timepieces made by Seiko. The brand always makes watches that’ll tell the time for a really long while. Nothing more, nothing less. While this sounds good, it always depends on what the wearer prefers. If you’re someone who loves beautiful watches that can rival the best timepieces made by Patek Philippe, a healthy amount of watch enthusiasts would say it doesn’t have that appeal. Now, what the others, on the other hand, have to say is the real gist. They say Seiko watches represent simplicity at its finest. Despite not being as famous as the likes of Rolex or Audemars, Seiko watches are at the least, very well-known for making budget-friendly timepieces that can rival those from more popular brand. If not in looks as we said, then in terms of functionality. How are Seiko Solar watches? Solar powered watches are a way to skip the entire issue of changing the batteries occasionally. Here, the solar watch charges by absorbing light and we mean any kind of light (not sunlight alone). This essentially means that the watch is constantly charging, and when it’s full, it has overcharge prevention measures in place to protect your sweet investment. A result of this that we must mention is that solar watches keep the time extremely well. It’s unlike a mechanical watch that needs frequent winding to properly operate. So yes, we can say that Seiko solar watches can be an excellent option. Technological advancements both around and by Seiko makes it possible to build a watch that’ll never run out of juice. Provided that you put it near a source of light occasionally. Which Seiko watches are fit for divers? When it comes to Seiko watches that we would recommend to sports lovers (diving or otherwise), all of the Seiko Prospex watches should be in your line of sight. You’ll find watches with resistivity ranging from 150M to 600M (you only have to choose). Amongst which you’ll see features like depth and dive time calculation, and even an alarm for creating dive sessions. To all of this, one tidbit is that the Prospex line makes use of titanium cases. It’s more than strong enough to resist water pressure and is also corrosion-resistant What does Seiko mean in Japanese? Seiko means a lot of things despite its seemingly plain looks. It can mean three things in our book: exquisite, minute and success. The first and the last meaning are self-explanatory, but there’s a pun in the second. Minute can mean small too, and we like to apply this to the company’s entire approach to their entire lineup. They make literally everything by themselves and that includes even growing something as minute as their quartz crystals (pun intended). “Did you know that Seiko released the first-ever Japanese wristwatch? It was called the Laurel.” What is the difference between Seiko kinetic and automatic. And which one is better? Knowing how an automatic watch works is going to make things easy, so here’s a quick brief. Automatic watches convert the kinetic energy you make when you move and then uses all of that energy to wind the mainspring in the watch. This is what keeps the watch running until it stops from the lack of you moving around. Now when it concerns Seiko kinetic watches (Kinetic Perpetual for example), all that kinetic energy is put into a battery. Because of this, Seiko kinetic watches, in terms of pure functionality, are better since they keep the time better and can be considered an upgrade over automatic watches. If you’re choosing just one, we think you should go for the Seiko kinetic watches. What’s the difference between Grand Seiko watches and Seiko watches? A stark difference between both of them is the price. Let’s put it this way. When it concerns the price of the Grand Seiko (GS), expect prices above a grand. But when it concerns Seiko watches, you’ll find plenty of watches under $1,000. As with the price, the toughness and sophistication increase too. As a result of that, there’s a hike in the quality of materials used in constructing Grand Seiko when compared to Seiko watches. What about the Seiko Premier watch? Seiko Premier is purely a dress watch. Down to the sleek looks and even the features/functions expected from a watch that has to catch public appeal. The line involves watches that carry Seiko’s personal touch in terms of fashion appeal. So, when you say “Where?”—we advise you to choose any of the watches under Seiko Premier if you’re appearing in any formal occasion any time soon. That includes work and dinners. As a matter of fact, here’s an idea. Seiko Premier watches are perfect even as a birthday gift for anyone you know who’s graduating soon. They can wear it to the graduation and you don’t even need to break the bank for a watch that’ll work indefinitely.

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  5. Casio Watches: Answers to Common Questions

    Casio Watches: Answers to Common Questions

    This time, let’s start with the simplicity of Casio watches. Other than the simple looks that makes it the perfect template—on every one of their displays (mostly quartz pieces), they only use the needed amount of words for clarification. It’s easy enough to keep up with labels like “water-resistant” and “Alarm.”  Likewise, seeing texts like “F-91W” tells you the watches’ number. After you’ve gone through their simple, though eye-catching looks, you literally came up with a kind of blank. Some of us felt that too, so took a walk through the brand’s history, following, and products. Where Are Casio Watches From? Most definitely, Casio is a Japanese brand all through. Yes, it does have a modern name, but that’s taken directly from the name of the engineer who made the company a success. For one, Casio itself was started in 1946 by Tadao Kashio, hence the name Casio. “Kashio invented Casino’s first calculator in 1949—literally the first of many” Although, it was in 1957 that Casio Computer Co. Ltd. released the world’s first electric compact calculator. Sure the size was on the heavy side, we think it was a step in the right direction considering their worldwide success. Who wears Casio watches? That’s a very good question, though it’s slightly tricky. It’s also one that depends on who’s asking. If you’re interested in their G-Shock line, know that you’ll appreciate the watch more if you’re typically required very physical at your job. Or you may simply love the roguish good looks. If on the other hand, you prefer any of the watches in the Casio Pro Tek series, that’s the ideal buy. Especially if you hike, hunt, travel, or are on the move a lot. Figuratively speaking, let’s say you’re wearing the equivalent of a Ferrari of watches (in terms of looks and technology), the Edifice line is your best bet. What’s the classic wear from Casio watches? The original ‘Time Lord’ of Casio is the Alarm Chronograph. The retro look is an original that’ll strike at anybody. Think about this: if you’re getting the watch for your son, buy an Alarm Chronograph with a silver case and a band made from rubber and he’ll easily look great in any situation. If you’re looking for something masculine, there are options with steel bracelets. Silver is a symbol of intelligence and sophistication, and that later boosts the watches already bold look. How to set the alarm on a G-Shock? Ordinarily, if we were dealing with one watch, it would have been straightforward. Instead, we’ll be leading you through how you can set the alarm on different G-Shock models. Model 1289 To enter the alarm mode on this model, press the button on the bottom-left till you see the watch display “Al.” After that, push the “Set +” or “Set +” button to set the hour and use the first (bottom-left edge) button to change to the minute display. There, you can customize the minutes. When you have customized the hour/minute to your preference, then you can use the bottom-left edge button to save. Model 5121 Here also, the button on the lower-left edge allows you to put on the alarm mode. If you press it multiple times, the left clock hand will hover above “ALM” which typically stands for “Alarm.” To set your desired time, push the button on the bottom-right edge of the watch. Finally, press the upper-left edge button to save the alarm. The watches’ second hand typically selects “ON.” Model 3180 and 3194 Also on the bottom-left edge, you push the button until the display shows “AL.” Following that, you push the button on the lower-right ledge to toggle through 4 alarms; AL1, AL2, AL3, AL4. Now, for each of the alarms, you can customize the time by pressing and holding the upper-left button for 2 seconds. Moving over to how you can set the time itself, you should go ahead and press the bottom-right button to set the hour. When you’re done with that, switch to the minute display by pressing the lower-left edge button. Use the bottom-right button to set the minute too. Just finish up setting the alarm itself by pressing the button on the upper-left edge. You can set any of the alarms (AL1, AL2, etc.) using this method. How to turn off the alarm on an Alarm Chronograph watch? It’s simple for some, while a bit evasive for others. Because of that, we’re going to show you how you can turn off the alarm on your Alarm Chrono. To that, the first thing you have to do is press the button found on the bottom-left edge. That immediately stops the alarm for the day. Although, it resumes on the next day. When you’ve done that, the last thing to do is to press the button on the right. That is what turns on off the entire alarm in place. You can turn it back on too at any time.

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  6. Watch Guide: Answers to Common Rolex Questions

    Watch Guide: Answers to Common Rolex Questions

    Even just hearing a whisper of their name easily reminds you of their immense prestige doesn’t it? When you think about how far watch manufacturers have come, Rolex is arguably one of the most valuable watch brand’s in the world. Rolex sells almost up to a million of their watches every year, and that’s potentially up to a million questions from. A bit far-fetched and complicated, but it is the truth. So, it’s pretty normal that we have some questions ourselves, because of obvious reasons. Now the best thing about that little fact is that our questions should be similar to yours. Watches are inherently the same (parts-wise), so we decided to put our answers down in words. They’re informational and dare we say it, a bit factual with a bragging side to them. Why is Rolex made from 904L steel? Timepiece enthusiasts know the worth of stainless steel. It has that perfect ratio of safety, toughness, and aesthetic appeal that every watch aficionado will love. In terms of the feel, steel has a firm and nice weight on your wrist that just feels right. All watch manufacturers that are worth their salt have gotten that particular formula down nowadays. Still, that tight look which easily catches everyone’s eyes comes at the cost of sweat build-up. And because of that, there’s the issue of wear over time. Now while this is a common issue with all steel types, you have to know there are different types of the material that watchmakers can choose from. All with different resistance to wear, corrosion, and the likes. So, in the early 2000s, Rolex made a really smart move. Trust us, we’ve looked at it from every angle we could and it’s the better decision, despite being a little more expensive. Rolex changed their entire lineup to 904L in 2003 instead of using the usual 316L. It holds polish significantly longer than 316L. Who makes Rolex movements? Rolex, as a watchmaker does not only make their own movements, they also build the other parts big or small like their beautiful cases and even the crown. After that, they smelt their own metals (gold, silver, etc.) and cut their own diamonds to their own particular tastes/standards. They are one of the few watch manufacturers that construct all of the parts they need for their watches in-house. So next time you see one of their timepieces, you now know why they’re always built to taste. How do Rolex test their dive watches? What we consider a huge plus in our books is that Rolex tests their dive watches in environments that subject them to a lot of stress. The watches are placed in an air-pressure chamber, wherein if the pressure changes at all, there’s been a leak in the case. This is what Rolex applies in Rolex Oyster case watches. All of this is kind of like an incentive to buy a watch of theirs and also a form of assurance to get more watches sold. “And it’s certainly working” In the case of the Submariner and Deep-Sea watches, they’re subjected to other tests that show if the watches are really resistant up to 300 meters. For the first one, the Submariner, the watches are heated up and a little cold water is added to them after they exit the air-pressure chamber. If water doesn’t form on the inside of the crystal, then the watches have passed. On the other hand, a different approach is taken with Deep Sea watches. This line is tested in a specialized pressure chamber that’s much less forgiving on the body than Rolex Oyster watches. We think it’s like a personal game of theirs, where they push their own watches than even the wearers. How long does it take to make a Rolex? Yes, there have been debates on how long it really takes to make a Rolex watch. But instead of the usual 6 months or a year that it supposedly takes, making a Rolex doesn’t even take up to 4 hours. The part that takes so long is gathering all the materials (gold, steel, etc.) that’ll then be converted to all of the necessary parts. This can take up to a year but then, do you still remember what we said about them selling up to a million watches each year? Well, how are they doing that? The answer is actually straightforward and what’s going on is that they have a lot of employees (gemologists for example) who work to build hundreds of timepieces per day. How do you manually wind a Rolex and how many turns does it need per day? If you’re using a Rolex with a screw-down crown, you just need to unscrew the crown counterclockwise until the crown pops out (in the 1st position). Then you wind the crown 28-40 times to fully charge the watch enough to work. You can stay in that range provided that the watch hasn’t seen any motion for a day or two. If you’re worried about over winding the Rolex, don’t be! Over winding Rolex watches are mostly impossible nowadays since they use a winding limiter. It kicks in when the watch has been fully wound. Though another cue is that you’ll feel a resistance when it’s fully wound. This is very useful in the case you’re winding a vintage piece. How many types of movements do Rolex use in their watches? In any Rolex watch, it’s either you see a mechanical watch, or you see one made with a quartz movement. The mechanical watches have their iconic ticking sound and they’re divided into two. The first is the automatic self-winding watches while the other is manual watches. Mechanical watches use a movement that must be periodically wound to work. But then the difference between the two types is that self-winding watches use the wearer’s motions to constantly charge the watch. The manual watches will have to be manually wound. Alternatively, their watches have quartz movements which make use of batteries. They’re slick since you won’t need to move them, but you will need to replace them periodically. Why does a mechanical Rolex watch lose time? Other than the fact that infrequent winds will cause your watch to lose time, mechanical Rolex watches are not built to have pinpoint time accuracy—unlike quartz watches. What they instead do is lose no more than 4 seconds and gain no more than 6 seconds per day. It should be a little underwhelming since quartz watches keep time more. But the level of craftsmanship put into every little part to eliminate the errors to that level must be respected.

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  7. Watch Guide: How to Match Your Watch and Clothes

    Watch Guide: How to Match Your Watch and Clothes

    You’ve just splurged on a seriously nice timepiece. You want to show it off. But you might also want to take a deep breath and consider how you are wearing your watch. Mismatching your timepiece and your wardrobe will send a negative message out to the world. While no rules are absolute, there are some general guidelines for matching your watch with your clothing. Keep the Formality Levels in Line This one might sound easy but it’s surprising how many people make this watch mistake. Just because that watch is expensive doesn’t mean it goes with formal attire. Only one watch pairs well with a black-tie ensemble — a dress watch. Your high-end Omega dive watch, Rolex racing watch and Breitling pilot watches are great but these luxury watches don’t belong at the most formal of formal events. The dress watch should have a minimalist face and a black leather band (stay away from brown, which is more for business wear). Business wear gives you a little more leeway. While a dress watch such as the famed Patek Philippe Calatrava with a black alligator strap is still an option, business dress also lends itself to nice dive watches. If you want to go the dive watch route with a suit, think slim. Bulky dive watches clash with suits, so you want something slimmer with an elegant design and a leather strap. Keep it simple and traditional in gold or silver. If you choose a dive watch for business wear, wear it boldly. Remember that James Bond famously paired his elegant suits with a Rolex Submariner. The best of both worlds? Consider getting a watch that can be used in formal and business settings. A simple silver dress watch with a plain face in white, gray or black can be incredibly versatile. Use a black leather strap for a more formal look and a brown strap for business dress or even going smart casual. Wide Span of Smart Casual Dressing smart casual gives you lots of options to accessorize with your watch. This look spans a wide range. It can be easier for men, running from a dress button down paired with some slim-cut chinos or a blazer with grey flannel trousers and no tie. For women, a rule of thumb is avoiding outfits you would wear to work — no suits or skirts! Think a sharp blazer and dark tailored jeans, a blouse and dress pants, and really any look that feels fashionable without leaning to conservative. Smart casual dress is best paired with more casual-leaning timepieces such as racing, pilot and field watches. Keeping Things Totally Casual When you go totally casual your watch should too. Jeans and a t-shirt are perfectly matched with a field watch. But of course, that doesn’t mean you can’t break the rules. From David Beckham to Ellen DeGeneres, many a famous watch aficionado has donned a chronograph or dive watch while totally dressed down in the most casual of looks. A near universal constant, jeans and t-shirts can be paired with nearly anything and that applies to your watch choice as well. Casual also gives you the freedom to let your sporty side loose. A good sports watch with a rubber strap works with almost any casual ensemble. If you want a sports watch that you can wear with a variety of outfits, stay away from bold color schemes such as red, orange and yellow. While they‘re great to add some flair to your wardrobe, you will get more mileage out of basic black or deep navy. When Do I Wear My Smartwatch? By design, smartwatches are generally best paired with casual dress. Sure, an Apple Watch has stylish bands that make it look sleek. The Sony Smart Watch is a minimalist wonder. And the Intel-powered TAG Heuer? Well, that’s so strikingly similar to a mechanical watch you almost don’t realize that it’s a smartwatch. But just almost. Smartwatches never quite rise to the level of formal, or even appropriate for business or smart casual. (Maybe the TAG Heuer if nobody looks too closely!). So, if you have a smartwatch on your wrist, keep it casual. Selecting Straps for Shoes and Belts If you’re wearing brown shoes and a brown belt, a black leather watch strap will look out of place. And vice versa for black belts and shoes. This gets trickier with sports watches with rubber straps and field watches with NATO straps that come in a variety of colors. Find a color wheel online to see which colors match well with others to create an outfit that’s properly balanced. The Dos and Don’ts of Matching Metals Consider the other metal accessories you’ll be wearing when deciding whether to put on a gold or silver watch. From rings, earrings and necklaces to belt buckles and cufflinks, you don’t want a predominantly silver motif clashing with a gold watch. And the opposite as well. Consider the colors of your outfits. If you’re wearing a color scheme with blacks, grays and blues, go with a silver watch. If you’re dressing in earth tones and shades of tan and brown, best to complement with a gold watch. While you shouldn’t wear your Apple Watch to a black-tie gala, or a dress Patek Philippe for a pick-up game of basketball, don’t get too bogged down with the rules. Consider the guidelines and then just do what you think best matches your innate sense of personal style!

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  8. 5 Types of Watch Bezels and How to Read Them

    5 Types of Watch Bezels and How to Read Them

    First, let’s go over what a watch bezel is for those who are not familiar with the various parts that make up watches. The watch bezel is the ring surrounding a watch that holds the crystal in place above the dial. Depending on the watch, they can be made from a variety of material. The most common are steel and ceramic, but some pieces use more expensive metals like silver or gold. Now that you understand what a watch bezel is, we can move on to the history of them. This history is somewhat unclear, but sometime around the 1950’s, watch companies began adding additional information to their bezels. They already had a basic function and an aesthetic appeal, but this shift brought a whole new level of utility. In the modern era, there are many auxiliary functions a bezel can be crafted to carry out. We explain the five most common bezel styles below. 1: GMT GMT bezels allow the wearer to keep time in two different time zones at once. The way it does this is by engraving a 24-hour timescale on the bezel, which is in addition to the typical 12-hour scale on the dial. While all GMT bezels have this, there are two different variants for actually keeping the time. First, your watch might have a GMT hand that tracks the time without you having the move the bezel. Second, you might have a bezel that rotates and no additional hand. Typical types of people who use GMT watch bezels are pilots and those who do a lot of business in other time zones. 2: Elapsed Time While certain watches have a chronograph to carry out the function of precise timekeeping, many of them do not. What an elapsed time bezel does it make it easy for you to count seconds or minutes passed, rather than needing to do arithmetic in your head. All you do is turn the bezel until zero matches up with the current time. These types of watch bezels are frequently found in dive watches due to a diver’s need for exact timekeeping. One fun fact about these bezels is that they only turn clockwise. This is a safety feature for divers who rely on their bezel to time how much oxygen they have left. If they bump their watch and the bezel shifts, it will tell them that they have less time, rather than more. 3: Compass Some watch bezels come with compasses drawn on them. They will feature indicators of North, South, East, and West, and often will have markings in between those indicators for more precise measurement. To use one of these, you need to orient yourself correctly. The best way to do so is by using the sun. First, remember that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. Next, figure out if the sun is rising or setting. Last, orient yourself so that east or west is pointed at the sun. You now know which direction to head. These types of bezels are most often used by outdoor adventurers. 4: Countdown Timer This type of watch bezel is the exact opposite of the elapsed time style. To use it, you need to match the number you want to count down from on the bezel to the current time. One use of this bezel is the ability to synchronize with others. This watch bezel comes in handy for people that work in aviation or the military. One more function is for runners or bikers who may want to time their workout. 5: Tachymeter The Tachymeter bezel is almost always found on watches with a chronograph because its function is to convert distance into speed, and vice versa. A chronograph is a very common watch feature that functions as a stopwatch. What the tachymeter does is let you find the unknown distance or speed, given that you have one of them already and combine it with time elapsed. One example of this is if you are a race-car driver and you travel for one mile in thirty seconds. Using these two metrics, you can find how fast you were going on your bezel. That number would be 120 MPH. This type of watch bezel is a favorite of driving enthusiasts and pilots. In the world of timepieces, you have a significant amount of choices. The most common are brand, price range, materials and style, but there are a few critical decisions that fly under the radar. One of them is watch bezel type. You don’t want to end up with a watch bezel that is of no use to you. When choosing your next watch, think about the utility and aesthetics of watch bezels and decide which serves your needs best. When you do, you will be one step closer to purchasing the perfect watch for your needs.

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  9. Common Watch Problems and How to Fix Them

    Common Watch Problems and How to Fix Them

    You’ve got a problem with your watch. You’re handy. You’re pretty sure you can fix it yourself… but have you asked yourself “how do I fix my watch?” Watch problems and issues might be more common than you think. Here are some common issues and tips on how to fix a watch. Before you begin, it’s important to understand that fixes done by anyone other than a watch-repair professional can affect the worth of your watch. The resale value of a luxury watch is highest when you have service records and its best that those services are performed by the manufacturer. But if that’s not a concern – roll up your sleeves and try to learn how to repair a watch! How to Open a Case It all starts with opening up your watch. A few exceptions aside, there are four kinds of watch cases you will encounter when you’re learning how to fix a wrist watch. 1. Snap-Back: To open a snap-back case use a penknife or similar thin, flat blade to pry open the case at the raised lip with a twist of the blade. 2. Screw-Back: You’ll want to pick up a screw-back removal tool for this type. Resembling a pair of pincers, the tool slips into slots on the perimeter of the case. Twist counterclockwise to open, finishing with your fingers after the tool has loosened the cover. 3. Case with Screws: These cases generally have four Phillips-head screws that can be removed with a small screwdriver. 4. Swatch-Style Case: These ports can be twisted open using a coin. You don’t actually remove the cover of the sealed case but do get access to the battery. My Watch Has Stopped Ticking Wondering how to fix a watch that stopped ticking? Or your automatic watch stopped working? Hint, it’s probably the battery. This may sound like a simple watch fix, but it’s something you might overlook. Check the battery. Many watch batteries have lives of about two years. That number can go up to three years or more with a quartz watch that’s designed to run longer. But chances are if your watch has stopped, you need to replace the battery. The case removed, you can see what’s holding the battery in place. With a spring clip or loose installation, you have easy access. Many batteries are held in place with a screw and cover that will require a small screwdriver. It’s best to use non-conductive watch tools to avoid damaging your watch with an electric shock. The same is true for the tweezers you’ll want to use for removing the battery. Plastic is best to avoid shock. Before removing the battery check the position of the writing on the back. You want to set the replacement battery in the same manner. The information on your old battery will tell you what replacement you’ll need. Even the most common watch battery will eventually give out. You can get a new one at a jewelry store, an electronics store, drugstore or online. Use the same plastic tools to set the new battery in place and your watch should spring back to life. If not, you may have inserted the battery upside down or the connection is broken. In the latter case, you may have to take it to a watch-repair shop. If it’s an extra pricey watch, you might want to get some help from the professionals too. The Second Hand is Skipping Did your automatic watch movement stopped working? Or is it skipping? This is a sign that your battery is near the end of its life. It’s also a warning to address the issue as soon as possible. An ailing battery could leak acid into your watch and do damage. If the second hand is locked in a back-and-forth movement in one spot, there’s likely an issue with the movement that’s beyond a simple home repair. My Watch is Running Fast (or Slow) Do nothing. This isn’t necessarily a watch problem. It’s common for watches to gain or lose a little time every day. While the changes are tiny and incremental, over time it can make it seem like you have a big problem. But unless you are losing more than a few seconds each day, there is likely no issue. The Buttons Won’t Bounce If buttons on your watch don’t pop out after they’re pushed in, the most likely culprit is dust. Even though your watch case is sealed, dirt can accumulate over time and get lodged in the springs that make the buttons pop out. Professionals use ultrasonic cleaners to safely remove the dirt. But you can use plastic tweezers and a tiny piece of absorbent material to remove the dirt. If you can’t easily access the tube that contains the spring, take it to a professional. Do not touch the spring with your fingers as you could introduce oils that will make the problem worse. Smartwatch Solutions I’m Always Recharging Much like your mobile phone and tablet, if your watch isn’t holding a charge for long you should look at what’s draining the battery. Remove apps you don’t need. Turn off features you aren’t using and dim your screen’s brightness. Voice Command Problems: If your smartwatch is having trouble recognizing voice commands, it could be background noise. Make sure your voice isn’t competing with other sounds. Some trial and error with tone and pacing will also be needed to make your voice commands instantly recognizable. I’ve Got a Sticky Apple The crown on the Apple Watch is notorious for sticking and ceasing to register each click. Turn off the watch and pour warm water on the whirligig for about 15 seconds. Bluetooth Won’t Connect Simple as it sounds, turn your Bluetooth off and on again to reconnect. But perhaps the best advice when attempting to repair your own watch is caution. A few pennies saved with home maintenance could do damage that could cost you quite a few dollars.

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  10. Watch Guide: How Are Watches Made?

    Watch Guide: How Are Watches Made?

    The question “how are watches made?” is a bit too general to answer as is. Instead, we should focus on a specific type of watch. Luckily, there is one that is profoundly more interesting than the rest: Mechanical. Lets look into how to make a watch. Generally, the most expensive and sought-after watches are mechanical, as opposed to quartz or digital. If you browse the website of a genuine luxury brand, the odds are that the vast majority of their pieces are mechanical and have a hefty price tag. The reason is that the inner workings of these watches are incredibly intricate, and many consumers see them as works of art. For this reason, we will point our focus to mechanical watches, with a few ending notes on other variations. Aesthetic and Functional Vision Watches have been around for a long time. Ever thought about how watch parts are made? Before any production begins, the watch manufacturer needs to have a plan. One part of that plan is deciding on the aesthetics and functionality of the watch. As far as aesthetics, they need to focus on issues like color, size, buckle type, and more. For functional aspects, the manufacturer has many options such as bezel function, showing the date, being water resistant to great depths, or having a chronograph. These decisions are important because they change the personality of the watch entirely. If you go one direction, you get a minimalist watch that just tells the time. On the other side of the spectrum, you might get a piece with a significant amount of functions and a design that turns heads. Once the manufacturer decides precisely what they’re trying to do with a piece, they can move on to the next step. High-Tech Movement Design The second aspect of pre-production planning is designing the movement of the watch, which is defined as the mechanics behind its various functions. Generally, this is some combination of springs, screws, wheels, and other typical mechanical pieces. Of course, not every watch is the same. Sometimes a manufacturer will want to create a unique movement, or they will include a difficult function like a full year calendar or chronograph. To do this, manufacturers use computer programs. This allows their engineers to develop perfect systems that are sure to function correctly. Once the movement is settled on and designed, it’s almost time for production to get started. Choosing Materials The last decision watchmakers need to make before beginning production is what material they want to use. (The standard is stainless steel.) Those include precious metals, ceramic, leather, expensive plastics and more. Again, these decisions are based on what the manufacturer’s goals are with the watch. If they want to create a bare bones model that is meant to solely tell time without costing too much, they will choose steel. If they are in the luxury space and want to create a piece with some flash, they may choose gold or silver. In-House or Partnership? Ever wondered how to build a watch? At this point, the manufacturer has a plan for the aesthetics, functionality, movement, and materials. Finally, they can move on to producing the watches. There are two ways to go about this. First, they can create the watch entirely or mostly in-house. This means that rather than sourcing their parts and materials from other businesses, they build a watch from the ground up. This is typical of luxury manufacturers, who pride themselves on controlling every aspect of production. The alternative is choosing a partner to produce some or all of the watch. That can mean contracting out individual pieces then assembling in-house, or submitting a design to a factory and having them build the entire watch. This practice is generally characteristic of more affordable brands. Hand or Machine? The final step in production is to decide which aspects of their watches will be hand built versus which will be built by machines. As with the former point, there is a split here for luxury and affordable pieces. In general, expensive pieces have more handmade aspects, while affordable watches are entirely machine-made. How Quartz and Digital Differ The other primary movement type, quartz, undergoes a similar process. The only difference is that the inner workings of those watches are usually less complicated than mechanical. For digital watches, the steps are again roughly similar, but when creating the dial and inside of the watch, they opt for digital circuitry. If you’ve ever wondered why watches are so fascinating, perhaps this article has answered that question. The potential reason is that an incredible amount of time, effort, and creativity goes into making a timepiece. The manufacturer must make choices regarding aesthetics, functionality, movement, materials, and production specifics. Of course, you don’t see any of this when you make your purchase. Instead, you see only the result: A masterpiece. Now that you know how watches are made and the watch making process, maybe you’ll appreciate the little wrist pieces a little more.

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