1. Newest Posts About Japanese watches

  2. 5 Best Seiko Credor Watches and Why You Need One Now

    5 Best Seiko Credor Watches and Why You Need One Now

    Credor is not a brand people hear a lot about. People often call it Seiko Credor, which is unsurprising, as it is a brand under the Seiko Corporation as well, much like Grand Seiko. We also know that the watches from the Credor brand have quite a steep price hike compared to most Seiko timepieces. Of course, this leads many people to think twice about Credor. Why do these timepieces, ostensibly under the Seiko brand name, have such high price tags that they could almost be considered luxury watches? We’ll tell you why: because it’s Credor — a Japanese legend. Credor or Seiko Credor? Seiko got the name Credor from the French phrase “Créte d’Or.” It means “the ultimate of the gold”, which makes sense considering the prices of the watches from this brand. In 1974, Seiko founded this company with the idea of producing watches made only from precious materials. This allowed the brand to completely embrace the Japanese aesthetic values — simple, delicate, beautiful. In the beginning, Seiko only used precious metals in Credor watches. However, more recently, you can also find stainless steel pieces in the Credor selection. Nonetheless, all Credor watches are premium timepieces — high-quality, lavish, and truly elegant. What makes Seiko Credor such an icon in the industry, despite its underrated status, is that it brings together everything Seiko is known for, while also boasting an added element of glamorous luxury. It carries more traditional craftsmanship in terms of its designs. However, inside the Seiko Credor watches are contemporary movements made with cutting-edge technology. Seiko Credor shows where 100 years of watchmaking expertise — shared between the companies operating under Seiko — can truly take a brand,. Sure, it might be more appropriate to call the brand Credor, but attaching the Seiko namesake just feels right. It is a Seiko Corporation brand, after all. In fact, Seiko used to put its logo in the dial of Credor watches as well. However, around the early 1980s, the dials of Credor watches became populated by the brand’s own “Golden Peak” logo and name, instead of Seiko’s. This “Golden Peak” Credor logo is the embodiment of a mountain that represents where Credor sits in terms of watchmaking — the summit. The logo comes with three stars on top that represent the three main tenets of Credor as a brand. The first tenet relates to creating designs that are unique while still keeping in mind the Japanese aesthetic ideals — delicacy, precision, and attention to detail. Secondly, a Credor watch must be precisely made and feature modern technology available at the time of its making. Finally, despite being an independent brand, Credor must always utilize the decades of Seiko’s history and heritage as a watchmaking company, including its craftsmanship and artistry. The Japanese DNA in Seiko Credor Watches Why the Seiko Credor is not as big in the west as it is in Japan is not a mystery at all. Sure, it is not typically marketed as a worldwide brand, but that is because Seiko Credor watches are never meant for anyone else. Seiko Credor is as Japanese as it gets — both in terms of inspiration and market-wise. It is made by Japanese watchmakers for the Japanese people. However, this does not mean that Seiko Credor timepieces should never be owned by anyone who is not Japanese. Instead, it just means that the timepiece you are getting is unapologetically Japanese. To say the least, a Credor watch is Japanese culture interpreted into a functional and elegant timepiece. That also applies to the watch’s technical aspects. This is what makes Seiko Credor such a unique addition to anyone’s collection. It is also a wonderful investment for the future. Many brands have changed their ideas over the years as modern technology dawned, but not this one. Designers and watchmakers at Credor do not compromise on its tenets. Japan is one of the most advanced countries in the world, and there are many ways a designer and engineer can apply modern technology without having to mess with the traditional aesthetics of a Credor watch. That said, the conservation of the brand’s philosophies does come with a price — and a hefty one at that. Seiko Credor watches are not your typical everyday timepiece. If you keep that in mind and set your expectations right, you will soon understand why Seiko Credor is one of the most sought-after luxury watch brands today. Seiko Credor’s Thin Movements Precision may be one of the tenets of Seiko Credor, but there is something else it is known for: its movements. What impresses patrons of the brand most about its movements are its dimensions. Yes, not just the prowess and accuracy they hold, but the way they are built. Seiko Credor movements are some of the thinnest watch movements you can find, not only in Seiko but also in the entire watchmaking industry. For instance, Credor Caliber 68 series movements sit at 1.98mm thickness. That makes this caliber the fifth thinnest mechanical movement in the world. Every component of this caliber was cut in 1/100mm units, forming a stunning movement that perfectly fits Credor’s standards. Even the quartz movements from the brand are exquisitely thin. The Caliber 6720, a quartz caliber introduced in 1980, is still the world’s thinnest quartz movement today, weighing in at only 0.89mm! These movements from Credor definitely prove that you do not have to produce a chronometer-grade movement to make waves in the industry. Thin movements equate to sleek watches with crazy good dimensions. These help keep Credor’s watches truly stylish. However, do not be fooled into thinking aesthetics are all Credor watches have going for them. After all, Seiko Credor still has that Seiko name attached to it. This assures anyone that the brand produces only high-caliber movements. These movements will perform beyond any expectations and can even surpass Swiss standards. 5 Best Seiko Credor Watches 1. Credor GCBE993 To begin the list of all the Credor watches you need to check out, we introduce the GCBE993. The Credor GCBE993 is a fairly straightforward watch, but it still has the artisanal flair you would expect of a Credor timepiece. It comes with the brand’s iconic “Raden dial.” Raden is a traditional Japanese decorative technique. As the process goes, artists place a delicate inlay material on a surface before polishing it with a few layers of lacquer. The Credor GCBE993 measures a slim 37mm in diameter and comes with compact tapered lugs. Additionally, the 6.5mm thickness makes it a fine, slender timepiece perfect for dressy occasions. This is a watch that stands out, especially as a conversation starter piece, thanks to its exquisite and unique Raden dial, which is undoubtedly the star of the timepiece. On the dial, right above 6 o’clock position where the seconds sub-dial sits, is a delicate pattern made from gold. Against the black dial backdrop, the flecks of gold look almost like stars floating in a dark, lacquered night sky. The markers at 12, 3, and 9 o’clock also draw some attention, for they are not applied nor printed. Instead, they are hand-drawn by artisans at Credor. This is one of the reasons why Credor is such a popular brand for collectors — every piece is a work of art. With such fine details, only experienced artists can craft this Credor timepiece. Just a little distraction or mistake could easily ruin such a beautiful and precise watch. The movement of the Credor GCBE993 can be seen through its exhibition caseback, giving you a glimpse of fine Tokyo stripes and vibrant blue screws. Even though the movement of this watch is thin, it still possesses beveled bridges, so light can play gorgeously across the surface of the movement. In addition, it only weighs 45g so it is ultra-light and slides right under the cuff. This watch costs around $8,600 USD in retail. 2. Credor GBLT999 Eichi is a Japanese word that means “Wisdom” in English. This is is also the name of the brand’s most popular timepiece. The second Eichi II was a true masterpiece that quickly caught on for many collectors. Crafting this watch requires an artist’s attention to detail, along with the technology used to its advantage. The Credor Eichi II GBLT999 is a model created especially by Seiko Corporation’s Micro Artist Studio. In this watch, you can get a glimpse of how Swiss watchmaker Philippe Dufour influenced the artists at Credor. This timepiece took the first generation Eichi watch and improved upon it. These upgrades include the placement of the power reserve display on the watch. Eichi I has it right on the dial at the 10 o’clock position. The Eichi II, on the other hand, chooses to put it on the underside of the watch, giving the dial a clean and symmetrical finish. The Eichi II was launched to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the brand’s foundation, as well as the 15th anniversary of the Seiko Spring Drive movement. For this timepiece, Credor utilized a modified version of the Spring Drive movement, using a hand-polishing technique that both gave it an unmistakable shine and improving its durability and operability. In addition, Credor also gave the movement a truly dynamic finish with some chamfering. With regards to the dial of the Eichi II, Credor went for a more muted, minimalistic aesthetic, with only deep blue markers, tempered hands, and a delicately-painted Credor logo against a stunning white porcelain dial. This is a beguiling dial that you simply cannot take your eyes off. Do not be shocked that this watch costs around $52,500 USD in retail. This is a pretty reasonable price, considering its sturdy, lightweight platinum case and high-caliber Spring Drive movement. 3. Credor GCCD993 Next up on the list, we have the limited edition Credor GCCD993 that was inspired by the gorgeous colors of the dawn. There are only 60 pieces of the GCCD993 available in the market, but that is not the only reason why this timepiece is so valuable. As is the case with most Credor watches, the dial of this watch is impressive in itself. It boasts a blue enamel dial that gives the illusion of a deep body of water right before the dawn of winter. This dial employs the use of impressive in-house enameling techniques. Craftsmen from the Ando Cloisonné Company are the ones responsible for the dial of this watch, creating beautiful gradients that are actually unique to Credor as a brand. They do this by layering four glazes. This technique gives the dial depth, adding an impression of increment radiating outwards from the center of the dial. This gives way to the octagons carved on the sterling silver base of the dial. You can get this limited edition timepiece with either a classy crocodile leather strap or a sleek stainless steel bracelet. With such an intricately crafted design, it is no surprise that the retail price of this watch starts at $16,600 USD. 4. Credor GBLS998 The Eichi II was impressive but wait until you meet the GBLS998, Credor’s Minute Repeating timepiece. This watch has the same incredible embellishments you can expect from Credor, but it also has an additional spec that makes it a true collector’s must-have. I am talking about the minute repeating complication that is known in the industry as a complex complication. The GBLS998 a bit bigger than other Credor models, but it is designed that way so that the minute repeater can function well. It has a cool and clear tone when the gongs hit, thanks to blacksmith Munemichi Myochin, a blacksmith and the 52nd head of the Myochin Family known for their stunning creations. The Myochin family is known as the House of Iron and they are known not only in Japan but also all over the world for their finely-tuned chimes, which they have also applied to the GBLS998. With the combination of the Myochin family’s techniques and the powerful Spring Drive movement, the Credor GBLS998 is a watch that boasts the purest chimes you could possibly find in a minute repeater. Along with the crisp acoustics of the watch, you will certainly not hear any interference from the movement either. There is a lot more to discover about this watch, and to hold it in your hand and experience its chime is the only way to really appreciate this timepiece. The Credor GBLS998 retails at around $400,000 USD. 5. Credor GCBD999 This is, perhaps, the most modern-looking watch from Credor. All the other watches we have discussed carry more traditional, conservative designs. The Credor GCBD999, however, embraces modern technology in all its aspects. This watch boasts a ruthenium black skeleton movement. This gives the watch a dressy look without having to take away from its spirit. It feels a lot like staring into the water’s surface when looking at this watch. It has curves that meet unexpectedly, and the fine bridge connecting the movement to the case as well as the metal frame supporting the caliber give this movement a modern edge. This intricate timepiece is a great alternative to models you might find from Piaget or Jaeger Le-Coultre. This watch was only recently launched, but it is definitely one to keep your eye on. It costs around $16,600 USD in retail. Cost of Seiko Credor Watches As of the writing of this article, you can find more than 80 models on Credor’s website. Their prices range from between $2,000 USD to $600,000 USD. Credor’s catalog offers a diverse range of watches that prove that Credor does not settle. The brand does not box itself into a certain market, nor is it afraid to take things down a notch when necessary. It can be intimidating to explore the entire range but you will definitely enjoy falling down the rabbit hole of Seiko Credor watches. Top 3 Alternatives to Seiko Credor There are a variety of reasons why the Seiko Credor might not be your cup of tea. It could be due to the fact that Credor falls on the more expensive side of the scale. Others simply do not get along well with the Japanese identity of the brand. Or, you might be looking for something just like the Seiko Credor. No matter what your reasons are, here are the top 2 alternatives to Seiko Credor, and one watch from each brand that you should definitely add to your collection today. Hajime Asaoka Photo from Hajima AsaokaIf you are looking for a brand of the same caliber as Seiko Credor, Hajime Asaoka is the one for you. This Japanese brand is well-known for its impressive collection of watches. However, just like Credor, this brand does not joke around when it comes to its price. Designer Hajime Asaoka established the eponymous brand, with self-taught knowledge in Haute Horlogerie, in 2005. The launch of the brand truly disrupted the Japanese watchmaking industry. Asaoka started out with a tourbillon watch, then proceeded to make many more noteworthy timepieces. Hajime Asaoka, unlike other brands, does most of the work himself, which explains the price of his watches. Like Roger Smith, he is an independent watchmaker who creates watches with a contemporary flair. You can expect Hajime Asaoka watches to cost around $50,000 USD or more. While it may sound like a lot, many collectors swear by this watchmaker for its precise timekeeping and quality pieces. Hajime Asaoka Project-T Tourbillon Photo from Hajima AsaokaOne of Hajime Asaoka’s most impressive watches is the Project-T Tourbillon watch. It is a traditional watch complication, given a contemporary twist with a modern design. Among its many quirks include the ball bearing located on the right side of the tourbillon’s upper bridge. This watch operates at 18,000 beats per hour, and has a power reserve of 40 hours. In this watch, you will find 13 ball bearings as well as 13 jewels. Hajime Asaoka used ball bearings instead of jewels because, according to the designer, they are lot more reliable and efficient than synthetic ruby jewels. These unusual ball bearings were made by Yuki Precision. If you are not familiar with the name, Yuki Precision holds the Guinness World Record for producing smallest ball bearings ever. They have crafted minute, 1.5 mm outer diameter ball bearings that have been used for fidget spinners. In addition, the Project-T Tourbillon watch also boasts a deep black dial with DLC processing which highlights the gunmetal features of the watch. This eye-catching timepiece costs around $80,000 USD in retail. Orient Photo from OrientIt is impossible to talk about the Japanese watchmaking industry without mentioning Orient. This brand is not the most popular of the bunch but it is definitely one that collectors enjoy. Orient provides intricate designs that range from affordable to high-end. Unlike brands such as Citizen and Casio, Orient focuses more on mechanical watches. This makes them one of the most affordable brands in the market. You simply cannot find mechanical watches from other brands at this price point. Orient designs also tend to lean more on the conservative side as well. Rather than the Japanese style and artistry exhibited by Seiko Credor and Hajime Asaoka, Orient watches tend to be closer in design to traditional Swiss timepieces. That said, the combination of Japanese craftsmanship and quintessential Swiss aesthetics does make Orient timepieces extremely appealing to collectors as well. Orient Star Mechanical Classic Photo from OrientOrient Star is the brand’s representative model, which truly helped it rise in the industry. The Orient Star Mechanical Classic RE-AZ0001S is powered by a hand-wound movement that gives it 708 hours of power reserve. This practical feature is all thanks to its new silicon escape wheel, which allows the watch to be lighter. The silicon escape wheel also gives the watch even better accuracy compared to other movements. It has an accuracy of +15 to -5 seconds per day. Aesthetically speaking, this Orient watch is stunning. It features a skeletonized dial that comes in stunning bronze and blue hues. It also has a hint of a spiral shape, reminiscent of the Milky Way. In keeping with the watch’s theme, there is also a noticeable comet-shaped component at the 9 o’clock position. The gold version of this watch costs around $2,600 USD, while the stainless steel version in silver-tone costs around $2,000 USD. Seiko Credor: Ingenious and Dignified We have all seen what Seiko can do in terms of technology. That said, perhaps the Seiko Credor line is proof that the watchmaking industry is more than just technology. Instead, horology is about heritage and art as well. This brand truly embraces the Japanese culture and puts forward its philosophies with great care. If you are looking for an individualistic luxury watch with its own unique character to add to your collection, the Seiko Credor is it. Everybody loves Seiko! Check out our review of the 6 best Seiko Kinetic watches and the top 3 Grand Seiko watches. Photos courtesy of Credor.

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  4. Seiko SNK809: All About The Best Starter Watch

    Seiko SNK809: All About The Best Starter Watch

    In the watchmaking world, there are certain essential know-hows you want to be aware of if you are at the start of your journey as a collector or an enthusiast. For example, one important detail you need to know is which timepieces are accepted or highly regarded by those in the watch community. While looking through hundreds and thousands of models might seem like an impossible task, starting off by doing research on beginner’s watches will serve as the foundation you need for everything else. With that being said, a handful of the most popular and wide-acclaimed starter timepieces are actually from the Japanese brand Seiko, which is why, today, we will be delving into one of their most marketable beginner models, the Seiko SNK809. Seiko: Through The Years Since their foundation back in 1881, Seiko has become one of the go-to brands for many watch patrons, and for good reason. The Japanese company has a very rich and colorful heritage that has helped shape who they are today. Just like most success stories out there, Seiko’s tale began with a determined protagonist called Kintaro Hattori.  At 21 years old, Hattori opened his very own shop in Tokyo where he sold and repaired all types of timepieces. This business endeavor did better than he could have ever imagined, and in a couple of years, he was able to upgrade to a factory that he dubbed the Seikosha. Seikosha is an amalgamation of two Japanese words that roughly translate to success (Seiko) and house (sha) in English. While it might have seemed like just an old factory to some, the Seikosha symbolized so much more for Hattori and his brand. With the opening of the Seikosha, opportunities came left and right until, eventually, Hattori was able to manufacture his first clock.  The years that followed came with both successes and challenges for Seiko. For example, in 1913, they launched the Laurel, which was the first wristwatch to ever be manufactured in Japan. A decade later, Seiko suffered a massive setback when their entire factory was destroyed by an earthquake. Seiko continued to push forward despite this, releasing the first timepiece with their official Seiko brand name on it in 1924. However, come the 1940s, and Seiko was one of the businesses negatively affected by the World War. These are just some events, out of many others, that makeup Seiko’s interesting history over the years. In a span of 140 years, Seiko has become one of the most established watch manufacturers in the industry. The Japanese brand is known as an innovator that produces accessible timepieces with unmatched quality. From leading the quartz revolution to the creation of numerous digital and analog models, these milestones and breakthroughs have helped in cementing their well-deserved status today. Ultimately, Seiko is a strong and unshakeable presence that is at the forefront of watchmaking, along with other renowned names like Rolex and Patek Philippe. Currently, Seiko offers a vast selection of timepieces that are further categorized into the following collections: Astron, Prospex, Presage, Lukia, Premier, and 5 Sports.   All About the Seiko 5 Sports Collection Our main watch for today, the SNK809, is actually a part of Seiko’s 5 Sports series. This iconic range is arguably the most popular one in the Japanese brand’s arsenal and has been for around 5 decades now. It was first launched in the 1960s and immediately took the world by storm with its unique principal attributes.  This Seiko 5 Sports is called such because it showcases 5 qualities, namely: an automatic movement, a day-date display, excellent water resistance, a deep-set crown, and a durable overall exterior. These features are the very foundation of the collection and can be found in every Seiko 5 Sports model.  Moving on, the Seiko 5 Sports is also considered something of an umbrella, with a bunch of other watch lines under it. These different sub-collections can be distinguished through the first couple of letters on the watch model’s name. For example, at present, the main Seiko 5 Sports pieces in production are those from the SRPD (2019) and the SRPE (2020) lines. On the other hand, they also used to offer the SNK series, which was once one of their most loved selections but is currently not being manufactured anymore. And the model of discussion today, the Seiko SNK809, is from this SNK sub-collection. Unfortunately, this means that the Seiko SNK809 is no longer available directly from Seiko, but we will focus on that later on.  Seiko SNK809: A Closer Look Now that we have established a more solid background about the brand and the collection, let us delve into the Seiko SNK809 itself. As mentioned, the SNK809 belongs to the Seiko 5 Sports range, specifically as a part of their SNK800 line. It was launched around the mid-2000s, along with other models in different color variations. In addition, the SNK800 timepieces primarily showcase aesthetics with an overall vibe that can only be described as something similar to military or field watches. If this is your first time hearing about the Seiko SNK809, it is probably not what you have been expecting after reading about how well-loved it is among watch enthusiasts. While it may not have a particularly avant-garde design or super-advanced mechanisms, the beauty behind this particular timepiece truly lies in its simplicity. Factors like its straightforwardness, accessibility, and how it boasts excellent craftsmanship are just some of the reasons why the Seiko SNK809 is considered one of the best introductory watches out there.  So, let us take a closer look, shall we?  Case First and foremost, the Seiko SNK809 is the picture-perfect example of a watch with a very versatile case. It has a diameter of around 37mm and a thickness of 11mm which makes it quite ideal, in terms of comfort and look, for those with either small or average-sized wrists. In addition, this watch also weighs a total of approximately 50 grams, making it incredibly lightweight and ergonomic.  When it comes to the materials used, the Seiko SNK809 features a 315L stainless steel case with a matte finish. Moreover, protecting the dial is a Hardlex crystal that is kept in place by a fixed bezel. Hardlex is a type of watch crystal specifically used by Seiko for their timepieces and, while it is not as popular as sapphire glass, it definitely does not lose out in terms of durability. In fact, Hardlex is known to be more shatterproof than other crystal materials. As mentioned earlier, one of the key pillars of the Seiko 5 Sports lineup is the unique placement of its deep-set crown. This is clearly seen with SNK809, whose crown is situated at 4 o’clock like the other Seiko 5 Sports models, as opposed to the usual 3 o’clock position seen on the vast majority of timepieces.  Lastly, behind all of this is a transparent case back through which you can get an up-close and personal view of the SNK809’s well-oiled mechanisms.  Dial Moving on to the face of the watch, the SNK809 comes with a strikingly simple and straightforward dial in black. It follows an analog layout with Arabic numerals, luminescent hands, an inner circle featuring the hour markers, and an outer circle with the minutes. Also, going back to the attributes of the Seiko 5 Sports collection, this model has a day-date display at 3 o’clock.  Strap As previously mentioned, the Seiko 5 SNK800 series was released in multiple color variations. The strap and the dial would typically come in the same shade, giving it a slightly monochromatic palette. The Seiko SNK809 was paired with a plain black canvas strap. While this may come off as a little boring to some, Seiko probably opted to go with this because they had the timepiece’s robustness in mind above all else. I personally think that the strap goes really with the sleek titanium case and jet-black dial, especially since it gives off strong military watch vibes. Regardless, for those who want something a little more exciting, there is always an option to swap the band for one that you prefer more.  Technical Details While Seiko is known for producing excellent dive watches, the SNK809 is not one of them. That said, as part of the Seiko 5 Sports range, it does still have water-resistant properties, but only up to depths of 30 meters. This means that the SNK809 can withstand splashes here and there, but should not be used for any underwater activities like swimming or diving.  Furthermore, the Seiko SNK809 is equipped with an in-house 7S26 caliber which follows an automatic movement. This mechanism features 21 jewels, a daily accuracy of -20/+40 seconds, and a frequency of 21,600 vibrations per hour. Lastly, it also boasts a rather impressive power reserve of up to 41 hours.  To put it simply, the Seiko SNK809 comes with great technical specifications, especially for a starter watch.  Price  The Seiko SNK809 was priced at approximately $100 USD when it first came out. While it is still in the same price range today, you can definitely get it at a lower cost from resellers online, depending on its condition. Its affordability from the get-go, paired with its amazing quality, is why the SNK809 is considered by many to be an excellent choice for a starter watch.  Who should get the Seiko SNK809?  Watch Collectors (Beginners). The Seiko SNK809 is widely known as a great introductory watch for those at the start of their watch collection journey. There are many factors that contribute to this reputation, such as how it exhibits quality Japanese craftsmanship, its affordability, and its unassuming aesthetics. If you are a new watch collector, you should definitely look out for this timepiece, because it makes for a solid addition to your personal range. Patrons of Seiko. For a brand that has been in the industry for over a century, it is only expected for Seiko to have a long list of iconic timepieces. While the SNK809 did not break any world records, it still became one of their most popular watches. This model is definitely a must-have for fans of the Japanese manufacturer, just because of its sheer impact on the watchmaking community which can still be felt today. Those on the Hunt for an Affordable, Quality Timepiece. This one is self-explanatory, especially after discussing the specs and affordability of the SNK809. Needless to say, it would be difficult to find a timepiece that shares the same excellent craftsmanship, reasonable price, and solid reputation as the Seiko SNK809. Where to get the Seiko SNK809? As previously mentioned, Seiko has stopped manufacturing the SNK series, which means that the SNK809 cannot be purchased directly from Seiko anymore. However, with a simple Google search, you will find that you still have a chance to get your hands on an SNK809 timepiece through online resellers. In addition, this particular model is currently available on Amazon for around $94 USD.  Be that as it may, if the SNK809 pieces online are not accessible for you, we have compiled a list of alternative models with a similar vibe to the SNK809 that you might want to check out. 5 Similar Models  Here are some watches that can serve as excellent alternatives to the Seiko SNK809.  Seiko 5 Sports SRPG33K1 Starting off with a watch from the same family as the SNK809, the Seiko SRPG33K1 is a very similar model in terms of the overall design. This watch makes for a great, more vibrant alternative that is readily available right now.  The Seiko SRPG33K1 comes in a stainless steel case along with a nylon bracelet in green. The forest green dial, which is protected by Hardlex crystal as well, features luminescent hands, Arabic numeral markers, and a day-date window at 3 o’clock. However, some notable differences are that the Seiko SRPG33K1 has an additional 24-hour dial layout and its crown is positioned at 3 o’clock.  When it comes to the technical specs, The Seiko SRPG33K1 still follows an automatic movement but is powered by a 4R36 caliber instead. The SRPG33K1 also has the same 41-hour power reserve but provides a better water resistance capacity at 100 meters.  Seiko 5 Sports SRPE69K1 Next up, we have another piece from the Seiko 5 Sports range, called the SRPE69K1. This model has a distinctly different design but gives off the same robust military watch vibe as the Seiko SNK809. It is a lovely option if you want a watch with a perfect balance of similarities to and differences from the SNK809.  The SRPE69K1 is presented in a stainless steel case paired with a black nylon strap. Its dial, which features a matte black finish, consists of hour markers in various shapes, slightly rounded hands, a minute track on the rim, and a day-date window. The layout of this model is definitely less busy than the SNK809’s, but it also comes with the signature crown positioning at 4 o’clock.  Moreover, this particular watch is powered by an automatic 4R36 caliber with a power reserve of 41 hours. Lastly, it boasts an excellent water resistance capacity of up to 100 meters as well.  Orient Sports RA-AC0H03B10A The Orient Sports RA-AC0H03B10A is a relatively popular model from another Japanese brand. It practically follows the same dial layout as the Seiko SNK809, which is why it is on this list. This timepiece is definitely an excellent alternative to check out as well! The Orient RA-AC0H03B10A comes in a stainless steel case with a classy leather bracelet in black. Much like the SNK809, its dial consists of luminescent hands, Arabic numeral markers, an inner circle for the hours, and an outer circle for the minutes. Aside from the crown position, the only other difference between the two watches is that this Orient model only has a date window rather than a day-date display.  Furthermore, the RA-AC0H03B10A is powered by an automatic F6722 caliber with a power reserve of 40 hours. It also has a water resistance rating of 100 meters, which means it can be used for various water activities.  Citizen Eco-Drive Chandler BM8180-03E The Citizen Chandler is a military-inspired model, just like the Seiko SNK809. This is the perfect accessible alternative for those who want a more sustainable option.  The Chandler comes in a stainless steel case with a woven strap in an army green shade. The black dial features Arabic numeral markers, large luminous hands, and a day-date window at 3 o’clock. This layout is similar to the SNK809, as this model also has hour markers on the main face and minute markers on the outline of the dial.  Unlike the SNK809, the Chandler is equipped with Citizen’s Eco-Drive technology, which utilizes light energy to power the watch. Lastly, just like the many other models on this list, it also boasts a 100-meter water resistance rating.  Hamilton Khaki Field Mechanical H69439531 The Hamilton Khaki Field Mechanical is the only option on this list that is not from a Japanese brand. Regardless, it is a suitable alternative because it also draws inspiration from the military, which happens to make up a huge aspect of Hamilton’s heritage. The Hamilton Khaki Field Mechanical features a stainless steel case paired with a brown NATO strap. The black dial consists of a minute track on the outline, a 24-hour layout, luminescent hands, and Arabic numeral markers. Unlike the SNK809 and the other models previously mentioned, this Hamilton Khaki Field does not have a day-date window.  In terms of movement, this watch is powered by an H-50 caliber that boasts an impressive power reserve of 80 hours. It has a 50-meter water resistance rating, which is just slightly better than the Seiko SNK809.  Final Thoughts  The Seiko SNK809 is one of the best affordable starter watches out there. Regardless of whether you are a collector or not, this particular timepiece is one that you should not miss out on if you want a good quality watch at a reasonable price. Aside from that, it also has a good reputation in the watchmaking community, which makes it even more appealing than it already is.  Photo Credits: Seiko, Amazon, and Official Brand Websites Want to read more about Japanese timepieces? Make sure to check out our article on the Orient Kamasu.

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  5. Seiko SARB017: The Iconic Alpinist Watch

    Seiko SARB017: The Iconic Alpinist Watch

    The Seiko Alpinist line is home to many high-quality Japanese hiking watches. Amidst the various stunning models, the collection contains the Seiko SARB017 Alpinist. Created in 2006, the Seiko SARB017 is probably the most iconic piece in this renowned series. While the main purpose of this timepiece is to be a reliable timekeeper for mountain climbers, it also carries an exclusive and luxurious design that keeps wearers and on-lookers constantly fascinated, no matter how many times they look at it. Even though the Seiko SARB017 was discontinued a few years ago, it continues to be highly sought-after by all sorts of enthusiasts and collectors from the watch community.  In this review, we will be inspecting the various specifications of the Seiko SARB017 Alpinist, to see just why there is so much undying hype surrounding this timepiece. Furthermore, we will also be taking a look at some excellent alternative models from the Seiko Prospex and the Citizen Automatic lines, to see how they compare against the Seiko SARB017 in terms of quality, characteristics, and price. Without further ado, let us have a go at the Seiko SARB017 Alpinist. Specifications Case Dimensions Most people would agree that the Seiko SARB017 Alpinist perfectly hits the sweet spot with its size. The SARB017 features a proportionate, well-sized case that measures 39mm in diameter, including its crown. It has a thickness of 12mm and has a slim lug width of 20mm. Lug-to-lug, the SARB017 measures around 47mm, which is also quite reasonable. In terms of weight, the watch weighs 79g, so it does not have much heft at all, which makes it light and easy to carry around on your wrist. Altogether, the timepiece can certainly fit comfortably on all kinds of wrists without looking too meagre or too bulky. Additionally, the Seiko SARB017 has a good curvature profile on its lugs, which makes it fit more cleanly on owners with small wrists while still being adequate to wear for those with larger wrist sizes. This model is pretty slim and compact, so you will not have to worry too much about accidentally bumping the wristwatch into things. Stainless Steel Case and Bi-directional Compass Bezel Seiko crafted the case of the SARB017 entirely out of stainless steel. Smoothly beveled throughout, the steel casing showcases a sleek exterior with a blend of brushed and polished surfaces that play around with light nicely. Fixed on top of the case is a stainless steel bezel that fits the watch case perfectly. The bezel of the Seiko SARB017 serves a unique purpose. While its outer portion is stationary and does not offer much beyond the protection of the dial, the inner section of the bezel wields the SARB017’s internal compass. The internal compass contains the directions, indices, and degrees that you can usually find in most compass watches. Printed in clear white and red, the labels are pretty small-scale but are still legible enough for wearers to easily read. The internal compass is neatly designed and does not compromise the dial’s elegant aesthetic. With the bi-directional compass bezel, wearers can use this Seiko timepiece to navigate through all sorts of terrains. For those who plan on bringing the Seiko SARB017 to their expeditions, this is a very welcome feature indeed. On the right side of the timepiece are two screw-down crowns. One is positioned at 3 o’clock, while the other can be found at the 4 o’clock position. The 3 o’clock knob carries a delicate “S” engraving and allows for manual hacking and winding. Those who possess this watch will know that turning the 3 o’clock crown also produces a distinguishable noise. Surrounding it are adequately-sized crown guards large enough to protect the crown well without hampering the wearer’s grip. The 4 o’clock knob, on the other hand, is used to manipulate the internal compass bezel. At first, wearers may find the compass a bit tricky to use, as the watch does not feature a compass hand, which can make it a little complex to read. In this case, the Seiko SARB017 comes with an instruction manual that informs users on how to operate the bezel. If you do not have the manual, there are also guides and videos online, made by owners of Seiko SARB017 timepieces, that will help you get accustomed to it. On the back of the SARB017 timepiece is a solid stainless steel caseback, which is screwed down for maximum security. While it would have been rather delightful to be able to view the movement through an exhibition-style caseback, the solid steel rear ensures that nothing can enter the watch from the outside, keeping the inner mechanisms safe from damage.  While the Seiko SARB017 is technically a mountaineering watch, it bears a water resistance capacity akin to that of a diver’s timepiece. Locked by screw-down crowns and a solid steel caseback, the watch can withstand up to 200m/20atm of water pressure. With that much water resistance, wearers can bring the SARB017 to any water sports and activities, from washing their hands to shallow diving. Honestly, this water resistance rating is more than enough for a wristwatch made for the mountains. Green Sunburst Dial The true highlight of the Seiko SARB017 is its dial, which features a green sunburst surface that plays around with light spectacularly. Depending on the light and angle, the face of the watch can promptly change from bright and pleasant emerald green to darker and more sincere jade green. On the outer rim of the watch dial, you can find a date window at 3 o’clock, Arabic numerals, and hour markers, all with gold-colored accents. Towards the center of the green watch face is an exclusive handset showcasing cathedral-themed minute and hour hands. There are not many inscriptions labeled on the dial. The only engravings you can find are Seiko’s signature and a few specifications about the watch’s movement and water resistance. As with many of Seiko’s models, the SARB017 uses the brand’s patented and eco-friendly LumiBrite technology for its luminescence. Seiko has always done a fantastic job when it comes to applying lume to their various watches. Though the lume pips of the SARB017 are pretty minuscule, the dial still manages to glow impressively in the dark. However, there is one downside. While the brightness does not disappoint, there is a bit of a problem with the watch’s overall legibility. Due to how Seiko designed the pips of the SARB017, identifying where the watch hands are pointing to can be a challenge in very dark environments. For a situation like this, you would probably have to take a closer look to really puzzle out the time. On the whole, the dial is not just lovely but also pretty well-balanced. Bearing only the essentials of a traditional Seiko watch, the dial is clean, uncluttered, and easy to read and admire. Along with the inner compass bezel, the Seiko SARB017’s dial looks unique while still remaining modest and elegant to the eyes. Sapphire Glass The Seiko SARB017 uses a sapphire crystal to protect its gorgeous green dial. Knowing how luxurious this material is, it can be relatively uncommon to find sapphire glass in a watch of this category and price range. Of course, with its luxury comes quality. As many of us are aware, sapphire glass is virtually scratch-proof. Rated “9” on the Mohs scale of hardness, the scratch-resistance of sapphire glass can only be outdone by diamonds. Keep in mind, however, that the sapphire crystal of the SARB017 does not come with an anti-reflective coating, so you might find yourself impeded by light glares in brightly lit areas. The sapphire crystal is flat and slightly raised above the case, which neatly matches the simple, measured, and elegant aesthetic of this Seiko watch. Seiko Calibre 6R15 Operating beneath the beautiful emerald green dial of the Seiko SARB017 is a Seiko Calibre 6R15 movement. Like many of the brand’s in-house movements, the automatic Calibre 6R15 uses the Seiko Diashock anti-shock system. This prevents the movement’s mechanisms from accumulating excess wear and tear. Paired with a power reserve that can last the watch up to 50 hours, the Calibre 6R15 can produce a total of 21,600 vibrations per hour. In terms of its precision, the Seiko 6R15 has an accuracy of +25/-15 seconds per day. Though it is an automatic movement, the Seiko 6R15 also has manual winding and hacking capabilities, which allows wearers to adjust the time more accurately. Patterned Leather Strap Seiko pairs the SARB017 with a classic brown patterned leather strap. That said, despite its comfortable fit, many owners of the Seiko SARB017 found the leather band to be a not-so-favorite part of this watch. This is largely due to the strap’s slightly plastic feel, which makes it a little stiff to wear. Thankfully, this wristwatch has a universal 20mm lug width, which allows users to easily replace the patterned leather strap with any other kind of after-market strap of their choice. As such, you can decide to either keep the strap or swap it for some other bracelet that perfectly suits your preferences. Price Before Seiko discontinued the SARB017 in 2018, the timepiece would retail at around $450 USD to $550 USD in Japanese domestic markets. Furthermore, as a member of the prestigious Seiko Alpinist line, this Seiko wristwatch is not something you can find just anywhere. Thankfully, there are sellers online who are currently in possession of a number of Seiko SARB017 pieces. Due to its demand and rarity, dealers tend to sell this Seiko timepiece for a much higher price than retail. An unworn SARB017 would generally cost you between $890 USD and $1,400 USD. If that seems a little too expensive for your budget, do not fret, for we have also found a Seiko SARB017 in good condition, selling at just $579 USD.  Alternatives Can’t find the watch anywhere? Not a fan of certain specifications? Whatever the case may be, we have prepared for you a list of excellent alternatives that nicely match the sleek aesthetics and overall feel of the SARB017 while costing you only a little more or a little less. Note that the prices listed below are approximate values as prices can vary depending on the dealer. Seiko Prospex SBDC091/SPB121J1 – $700 USD Just at a single glance, anyone can see that the Seiko Prospex SBDC091/SPB121J1‘s resemblance to the Seiko SARB017 Alpinist is uncanny. Before we proceed, you might be wondering why this Seiko Prospex model has two reference numbers. To make things clear, SBDC091 is the original reference number used locally in Japan, while SPB121J1 is its international reference number. Factually speaking, both reference numbers are correct. Seiko released the SBDC091/SPB121J1 in 2020, under the Prospex line. This timepiece was dubbed the Seiko Prospex Alpinist and features a slew of refined specs and up-to-date technology while still retaining the excellent qualities of the original 2006 model. So, just what is new with the Seiko Prospex Alpinist SBDC091/SPB121J1? Several things, to be precise. First of all, this 2020 Alpinist edition is a millimeter thicker than the SARB017. Instead of having a leather strap like the previous SARB017, Seiko couples the SBDC091/SPB121J1 with a new leather band made of calfskin. The calfskin band bears a lighter shade of brown and feels much smoother and more comfortable than the 2006 variant. Aside from that, the SBDC091/SPB121J1 also carries a new and improved sapphire crystal, which Seiko has treated with a layer of anti-reflective coating. With the addition of a cyclops lens on the sapphire crystal, wearers can also have a better view of the date window. As you look at the beguiling green dial, you will notice the Seiko Prospex logo and other compact inscriptions.  The differences don’t just stop there. Underneath the dial is an automatic Seiko 6R35 Caliber that runs numerous mechanisms within the timepiece. Compared to the 6R15 Caliber of its predecessor, the slightly larger 6R35 contains 24 jewels and has a power reserve that can last a whopping 70 hours. With the addition of 20 more hours of power reserve, owners of the SBDC091/SPB121J1 will not even have to wind their watches on the weekends. Apart from those differences, the 6R35 works just as well as the 6R15. It is just as accurate in timekeeping and produces the same number of vibrations per hour. That said, another difference between the two Alpinist models lies in their rear cases. While the SARB017 uses a solid stainless steel caseback to cover its hind end, the SBDC091/SPB121J1 showcases the beauty of the Seiko 6R35 movement through a highly secure see-through rear case. Lastly, we can compare and contrast the availability of the SARB017 and the SBDC091/SPB121J1. Since Seiko ceased production of the SARB017 back in 2018, stocks are limited, which, in turn, has affected its pricing. As stated previously, most SARB017 timepieces these days can cost you anything between $890 USD and $1,400 USD. On the other hand, if you find that a little exorbitant, you can opt for the SBDC091/SPB121J1 instead. Since the SBDC091/SPB121J1 is still being produced by Seiko and is, therefore, easier to find. It retails at a more budget-friendly price of $700 USD. Citizen Automatic NJ2198-16X Mechanical Field Watch – $170 USD If you are on a budget and cannot deal with the Seiko SARB017’s elevated prices, Citizen has a neat and affordable alternative for you. The Citizen Automatic NJ2198-16X is a green dial compass watch that proves to be highly competitive despite its lower retail price of $170 USD. That said, compared to the Seiko SARB017, the price of the Citizen NJ2198-16X does reflect some cuts in terms of quality. So, what are we getting from this watch with the $170 USD price tag, and how exactly does it fare against the SARB017? Let us find out. The Citizen NJ2198-16X comes in a 46mm stainless steel case. It has a bottle cap rotating compass bezel with very pronounced directions and degrees printed in white. Since this is a timepiece that costs less than $200 USD, it is no surprise that the watch uses a mineral crystal instead of luxury-grade sapphire. Mineral crystals are certainly more limited in terms of resistance, but they can still handle some light scratching. Furthermore, they might actually be more impact-resistant than sapphire glass is. The NJ2198-16X also boasts a screwed-down solid steel case rear which has a smoothly polished surface and some inscriptions on its outer rim. With all its exterior components, this Citizen watch is water-resistant up to depths of 100m. Citizen pairs the NJ2198-16X with a textile black and white leather strap. Apart from sharing the same green hue, the dial of this Citizen watch is quite different from the Seiko SARB017. Its boasts sizable Arabic numerals and thick hour indices. There is not much on the dial, except for the brand signature and the “automatic” specification of its movement. The true standout of the dial is its eccentric handset. It has a stubby minute hand and a red-outlined hour hand that resembles the standard-issue dark lightsaber of The Empire in Star Wars. The second hand has a white bubble and a red tip on its end. Visually, the dial comes off as a little plainer than both the SARB017 and its 2020 re-edition. Still, it does not look bad at all, with a clean aesthetic and well-spaced elements that are easy to read. Controlling the different gears and mechanisms of the NJ2198-16X is an automatic Citizen 8210 Caliber. Held together by 21 jewels, this mechanical movement produces 21,600 vibrations per hour and is manually hackable. It also possesses a power reserve of up to 40 hours. Not bad for a $170 USD timepiece.  While the Citizen NJ2198-16X is not quite up to par compared to the Seiko SARB017, it still proves to be an efficient timekeeper at a much more affordable price. If you are on a tight budget and appreciate its looks and qualities, the Citizen NJ2198-16X remains a good option. Final Thoughts Many would consider Seiko an underrated brand, not just because of its popularity, but on account of its reputation. As many of us know, Seiko, and Grand Seiko, are known for making stellar timepieces that step up to the quality of the likes of Rolex and Omega. Unfortunately, Seiko is commonly associated with mall brands, which, does not give it the same prestigious image as other Swiss watchmakers. Those who know the Japanese brand well agree that Seiko does not get the credit it rightfully deserves. All things considered, no words can rightfully describe how astounding this Seiko watch truly is. For something as relatively affordable as it is, you cannot go wrong with the Seiko SARB017. Boasting numerous hiking capabilities while still appearing sleek and stylish, it is easy to see why everyone wants to get their hands on this brilliant Seiko timepiece. Whether it is for navigating the mountains or upping your dress game at prestigious events, the SARB017 can get the job done right. It is a shame that, with its discontinuation, this iconic watch is not so easy to find nowadays. That said, while the Seiko SARB017 is indeed a rare specimen, its alternatives, the Citizen Automatic NJ2198-16X and the Seiko Prospex SBDC091/SPB121J1, are easier to find and are pretty nifty as well. Want to learn more about watch movements? Why not check out the most iconic caliber of them all, the Valjoux/ETA 7750. All photos credited to WatchShopping.com

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  6. Orient Kamasu: A Guide To The Expert Diver’s Watch

    Orient Kamasu: A Guide To The Expert Diver’s Watch

    Ever since Orient entered into the world of horology, it has received a great deal of respect in the community for producing high-quality, well-designed timepieces. All of their watches are made to honor Japan’s traditions and values. When you wear a Japanese watch, it is not just about wearing it to complete your newest fashionable look. Rather, you are actually wearing a piece of the country’s state-of-the-art technology, as is the case with the Orient Kamasu Red and Orient Kamasu Green models.  Since they are both renowned Japanese brands, Orient watches are often mistaken for and even compared to Seiko watches. These two popular watchmaking brands have their own individual expertise in craftsmanship and different inspirations for producing watches. While Orient is part of the Seiko Group, they can still be considered two different brands as both are distinct when it comes to their operations and productions.  Today, let us get into the Orient Kamasu, which is one of the toughest competitors to the Seiko SKX line. Read more about the Orient Kamasu’s exceptional qualities below and see just why it is one of the most popular timepieces today. Get To Know The Orient Kamasu  The Kamasu collection got its name from a distinctive sea creature, which is the Barracuda. Barracudas are big and fearsome fishes that are widely considered to be strong and inquisitive. Its long and thin body allows it to move rapidly, at speeds of around 36 mph (58 kph). Despite its terrifying appearance, the barracuda is an animal that receives utmost interest from professional divers around the world. The Orient Kamasu mirrors the fish’s features, specifically the teeth, which are mimicked through the sharp, triangular indices and handset of the Kamasu. Since its release in 2019, the Orient Kamasu has thrived among the thousands of dive watches on the market. This is largely due to its superior elements, robust functions, and much more affordable prices compared to other brands. One of the Kamasu’s most remarkable highlights is its wearability. Most users cannot deny the fact how smooth the watch feels against the wrist. Its solid structure, with polished surfaces and no sharp edges, also gives off the impression of being very well-crafted. One improvement Orient has made with the Kamasu is that it fixes the problems of old Orient watches, such as the lack of hand-winding, hacking movement, and poor hand functions. To address these shortcomings, Orient has equipped the Kamasu with a new automatic caliber that has increased accuracy of ±15 seconds from -25/+35  seconds accuracy per day and comes with a stops-second function. This caliber is used in a number of Orient Kamasu variants, including the Orient Kamasu Red Ref. RA-AA0003R19A, the Orient Kamasu Green Ref. RA-AA0004E19A, the Orient Kamasu Blue Ref. RA-AA0006L19A, and more.  Orient Kamasu’s Specifications and Overview An affordable price does not have to equate to low-quality and poor performance, and the Orient Kamasu is certainly proof of that. If you are planning to purchase a reliable dive watch, but you’re also working with a tight budget, look no further than the Orient Kamasu collection. Let us take a deeper look at its features and functions. Case Case Diameter: 41.8mmCase Thickness: 12.8mmCase Material: Stainless steelBand Width: 22mmLug-to-lug Distance: 46.8mmThe case is a crucial component of any watch, and as such Orient devoted a great deal of effort into creating a good one for the Orient Kamasu. The Kamasu has a well-proportioned case size of 41.8mm and a lug-to-lug distance of 46.8mm with a 22mm lug width, so it can fit comfortably on the wrists of both men and women. Despite being a robust watch, the Kamasu is not too bulky or sporty and is just versatile enough to fit most fashion senses. The case itself is crafted from corrosion-resistant stainless steel, with a brushed surface on top and well-polished surfaces on the sides. Stainless steel is not just anti-corrosive but is also impact-proof and able to withstand being accidentally knocked around, especially when used in everyday life. This durability makes the Orient Kamasu perfect for people with adventurous and outdoorsy lifestyles. You will also notice the Kamasu’s properly curved lugs, tucked without reaching beyond the bottom of the screw-down caseback and with no harsh edges. The curved lugs sit well on the wrist, making the experience of wearing this watch a comfortable one that will not wear your wrist out throughout the day. In addition, the brand’s craftsmanship is shown in the gradual transition from having a brushed finish to a polished finish. Using solid, dense materials like stainless steel can sometimes make a case too heavy for a wearer, especially for those with more petite wrists. However, the Orient Kamasu only weighs 6oz, or 170g, which is considered quite lightweight for a dive watch. Its overall case design is also reminiscent of a traditional sports watch, so people who prefer a sportier vibe will be quite satisfied with the Kamasu. Dial The dials in the Orient Kamasu come in a variety of colors like red, dark green, blue, and black. Perhaps the favorite of most watch enthusiasts is the wine red dial. The subtle gradient red dial with a ruby sunburst pattern shines impeccably when reflected under direct light. As mentioned, the triangular hour and minute markers, as well as the thick handset, are all inspired by the Barracuda’s sharp teeth. The second hand is the most distinctive of all, as it has a thin and long shape, stretching up to reach the minute markers and give an accurate reading of time.  All Orient Kamasu watches are equipped with day and date displays that are nicely framed at the 3 o’clock position. You can see that the numerals in the date display are perfectly sized so as to be clearly visible regardless of the lighting conditions. LumiBrite technology is also added to indices, the handset, and the day and date aperture to give you a handy glow-in-the-dark watch when in the dark. On the dial, you can find the brand’s name, logo, the water-resistance capacity of the watch, and the movement used, all delicately printed and spaced out. Unlike other dive watches, the Orient Kamasu does not come with a chapter ring that makes the dial appear larger, which is a rather unique choice. Instead, the Kamasu maintains a slim and lightweight appearance.  Crown and Bezel The Orient Kamasu also features a secure screw-down crown, placed in the customary 3 o’clock position. It has the Orient logo engraved into it, and is well-sized, just enough to be functional and easy to grip. The solid teeth-shaped ridges also help to provide the wearer a more secure hold on the crown. As with most Japan-made crowns, the crown of the Kamasu is waterproof, styled to have a long post and a direct o-ring gasket. You might observe that the Orient Kamasu’s crown is slightly smaller compared to other watch brands. This is intentionally done so that the crown will not get in the way, scratching against the wearer’s wrist or getting easily damaged. The crown is often one of the most vulnerable parts of a watch, so Orient has designed it to be slightly smaller, with secure crown guards for extra protection. In addition, the Kamasu also has a 120-click unidirectional bezel, a standard requirement for diving watches. It rotates counter-clockwise providing a safe and consistent pattern for divers to track their bottom times. That said, if you are a professional diver, you know that the deeper you dive into the depths of the ocean, the darker it is, and the poorer your visibility will be. To ameliorate this, Orient has equipped the Kamasu with a luminescent bezel for accurate timekeeping even underwater. The 120-click function of the bezel also gives you better and more precise accuracy when aligning the zero markers at the bezel tip to the minute hand. Bracelet The Kamasu watches come in either stainless steel bracelets or rubber straps, depending on which model you choose to have. The stainless steel bracelets are water-resistant, corrosion-resistant, and able to withstand variations in temperature. They are easy to clean, and because of the material, do not soak up or retain any kind of sweat after thorough exercise. Stainless steel bracelets can be a little heavy on the wrist, but they are also very versatile and can blend well with almost any style.  On the other hand, if you frequently engage in water activities, rubber straps might be preferable. Rubber is best used underwater. They are built from materials like silicone and polyurethane, which tend to be more lightweight, comfortable, and incredibly resistant to water. So if you intend to regularly exercise the Orient Kamasu’s capabilities as a dive watch, you might want to opt for a rubber strap. Movement An F6922 Caliber Automatic powers all the models under the Kamasu collection. It is a self-winding, automatic movement equipped with 22 jewels. This powerful in-house movement provides functions including hours, minutes, central sweep seconds, and a day/date indicator. Orient has claimed that the movement comes with an accuracy of -15 seconds to +25 seconds a day. Of course, this depends on the surrounding temperature, as well as the winding mechanism and the dial’s position. The F6922 Caliber comes with a 40-hour power reserve, which is more than sufficient for a modern mid-range dive watch today. It also has self-winding and hacking features, which are great additions to this movement, since many other dive watches lack them. You just have to make sure to carefully maintain the accuracy of the watch by wearing it for at least eight hours a day and setting the date within the hours of 8:00pm and 4:00am. Top Orient Kamasu Watches 1. Orient Kamasu Red RA-AA0003R19A For a price of just $280 USD, you can get this beautifully masculine Orient Kamasu Red. The case of this watch is almost exactly like that of the Orient Ray II. It is 41.8mm wide and measures 46.88mm from lug to lug, large enough to fit well on any man’s wrist. The bracelet is made of 316L stainless steel with a push-button deployant clasp. The bracelet uses a solid, Oyster-style link, so you don’t have to worry about its durability. The jet-black bezel also stands out from the usual dive watches in the market, with dotted patterns in between bold white numerals. The real highlight of the Orient Kamasu Red, however, is the red sunburst pattern on the dial, especially when positioned at the right angle, and with perfect lighting. At the 3 o’clock position is the day and date aperture, enclosed in a silver frame and placed against a white background. The color combination of red, white, and silver against the wine-red dial provides a good contrast, giving the wearer a clear and visible display. 2. Orient Kamasu Blue RA-AA0002L19A Another variation of the Orient Kamasu is the model with a deep blue dial and bezel. Just like the other pieces, this can be bought for $280 USD. This price is a great deal for a dive watch, especially given its top-notch features and functions. The Orient Kamasu blue has a 41.8mm size diameter, which is great for those who want a mid-sized watch with a comfortably lightweight profile for water activities. The contrast of its smooth silver finish and royal blue bezel and dial adds a level of class and elegance, so you could easily wear this watch to more formal suit-and-tie occasions as well. As with other Kamasu watches, this Orient Kamasu Blue comes with a flat sapphire crystal. Sapphire is one of the hardest materials used in luxury watches. Not only is it scratch-resistant, but it is also durable enough to withstand impacts, cracks, and breaks, unlike glass or plastic materials. The use of sapphire gives the dial a great deal of protection. 3. Orient Kamasu Black RA-AA0005B19A The Orient Kamasu Black RA-AA0005B19A is the latest addition to the Kamasu collection. Despite looking strikingly different from most other Kamasu models, it retails at the same affordable price of $280 USD, making this a piece worth checking out indeed. This model of the Orient Kamasu features gold accents on its bezel, indices, and hands set that contrast handsomely with the sharp black dial and strap. A slim profile highlights the entire case, giving it an air of sophistication that makes it a good match for any outfit and occasion. This model has a different look than the others in this collection. It uses silicone as its strap material instead. Silicone is a good material for sports watches since it is highly resistant to low and high temperatures. It is also more flexible and does not hurt the wrist, especially when you are doing intense sports activities. The Orient Kamasu Black also uses an Ardillon buckle for the clasp, adding a classic and simple look that’s well-suited for men. This is a more traditional option for watchmakers who want to design an easy-to-wear watch. This kind of clasp only needs to be clipped onto the buckle and pinned securely on the wrist. It has a flatter profile, a more classic design, and is less expensive. One problem with this clasp is that the Ardillon buckle can sometimes come open while being worn, so wearers have to be careful with this watch to make sure it does not fall off unexpectedly. 4. Orient Kamasu Green RA-AA0004E19A The Orient Kamasu Green RA-AA0004E19A is another best-selling timepiece for men. Just like the previous watches, it has a 41.8mm stainless steel case and 47mm lug-to-lug length. For a price of $280, it showcases a dark green dial with a beautiful sunburst pattern, which changes its color depending on the reflection of light. This timepiece also comes with a matching dark green bezel, with its 60-minute scale printed on it in a contrasting white hue. The Barracuda-inspired indices of the Orient Kamasu Green are generously coated with luminous material, which is very important for a dive watch, as it guarantees optimal readability even in dim lighting conditions. A substantial power reserve of 40 hours ensures that you don’t have to constantly wind this watch to keep it running. Orient Kamasu vs Seiko SKX  Anyone interested in the horology industry knows that these two lines of Japanese watches are always compared with each other. In fact, the Orient Kamasu and Seiko SKX are likely each other’s greatest competitors in the industry of watchmaking. They both set a high standard for entry-level dive watches in the market.  Though Orient is part of the Seiko Group, it maintains itself as a distinctive brand, with its own unique timepieces and innovations. Although Orient watches tend to be of slightly inferior quality compared to Seiko timepieces, the Kamasu collection was specially designed to be an improvement on the old models, featuring cutting-edge innovation and top-notch craftsmanship. It is Orient’s crowning glory, both in terms of aesthetics and functions offered. Combined with the fact that it is available at a very competitive price, the Orient Kamasu’s superior aspects cannot be ignored by many watch collectors. So, how exactly does the Kamasu fare against the Seiko SKX? Firstly, the case of the Seiko SKX has a polished finish, with slender curves and no sharp edges. It has a slightly larger case size of 42.3mm and offers a variety of colors for the dial. And to support the inner adventurer in you, it uses Seiko’s Hardlex crystal, which is proven to be resistant to everyday wear and tear, to protect the dial. An ISO-certified 200-meter water resistance capacity is another great feature that the watch possesses, as wearers can bring the Seiko SKX with them to poolside diving, swimming, snorkeling, and other such water activities. The Orient Kamasu, on the other hand, is lightly brushed on the top. It features the Orient brand logo delicately carved into its case back. A closer look at the dial reveals to you a beguiling and subtle gradient texture, which is great for those who don’t want a dial with just one solid color. To protect its dial, it uses a sapphire crystal, which is also known to be extremely scratch-resistant and is commonly used in durable watches. The Kamasu watches have a smaller case size of 41.8mm, so they can be worn more comfortably by both men and women. While the Orient Kamasu does not have an ISO rating, it does feature the same 200-meter water resistance, just like the Seiko SKX. The movement used is also a big determiner in the competition between these two watches. The Kamasu’s Caliber F6922 is an innovative movement with features like hand-winding and hacking and features +25 / -15 seconds accuracy per day. The Seiko SKX, on the other hand, only provides an accuracy of +50/-20 per day and does not come with hand-winding or hacking functions. In terms of the accuracy of timekeeping and the robustness of the features offered, the Kamasu clearly wins this round. Price is yet another deciding factor between these two models. Orient retails at a lower price of $280 USD, while the Seiko SKX can be purchased for an approximate price of $400 USD. Note also that the SKX collection has been discontinued; as such, prices may change depending on the independent seller you are dealing with. Most people can tell you that Seiko SKX is a popular, historical, and established collection of dive watches. On the other hand, the Orient Kamasu is a perfect example of a new challenger, a risk-taker that gives you a better value for money. All of its watches are made to give a modern, youthful look for a wearer. Final Thoughts If you are planning to get yourself a practical and functional diver’s watch, the Orient Kamasu will definitely be a great pick for you. On the whole, it offers plenty of features for a very affordable price point. The sapphire crystal, 40-hour power reserve, hardy stainless steel case, robust Caliber F6922, handy uni-directional bezel, secure screw-down crown, and wide range of models available for your choosing are more than enough to justify the affordable $280 USD price.  The Orient Kamasu will make for a great companion during your outdoor activities. Not only does it come with many useful functions to fulfill your every need, but its versatile look, which is not too sporty or bulky, also makes it great for everyday wear. Looking for a dive watch that would allow you to explore even greater ocean depths? Check out our list of recommended Deep-Sea Dive Watches and find a watch perfect for your next deep-sea mission.  Photo credits: All photos courtesy of the brand’s official websites.

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  7. Citizen NY0040: The Enduring Diver

    Citizen NY0040: The Enduring Diver

    If you are familiar with the world of watches, then you know that there is more to the industry than Swiss timepieces. Countries like Germany, Denmark, the United States, and others are becoming more and more known for their expertise in watchmaking. However, if there is one country that’s almost as well-recognised as Switzerland when it comes to horology, it would probably be Japan. Longstanding Japanese brands, like Seiko and Casio, are proof of how well the Japanese have mastered the craft. While it may seem like a competition, the watchmaking industry is a place of innovative cooperation and coexistence, and Citizen is the perfect embodiment of this. Many view this brand as the perfect mix of Swiss and Japanese craftsmanship, but we’ll get more into that later. If this has piqued your interest, then read on because we’ll be talking about Citizen Watches and in particular, their Citizen NY0040 model in this article.  Citizen: A Brief History  Citizen’s origin dates back to a little over 100 years ago in 1918. A jeweler named Kamekichi Yakamazi established a watch manufacturing firm called the Shokosha Watch Research Institute. The interesting thing about this firm is that Yakamazi was able to acquire Swiss machines and instruments for his company from watchmaker Rodolphe Schmid. This is where the idea of Citizen as a product of both Swiss and Japanese craftsmanship began. A couple of years down the line, and the Shokosha Watch Research Institute changed their name to the one they’re still known for today: Citizen Watch Company. This change was brought about by an ambitious goal in which they hoped to equip every citizen in Japan with a watch produced by them. Just like any other origin story, Citizen also went through their fair share of triumphs and obstacles throughout the years.  The Japanese manufacturer had a relatively strong start but certain unfortunate events happened, specifically the 2nd World War, which negatively affected the whole economy. While this was a devastating time for many individuals and businesses, it also became an avenue for a fresh start. After the war, Citizen decided to introduce themselves to the rest of the world under the name the Citizen Trading Company. This new moniker highlighted how their goals had shifted from being a Japanese-centric company to one that is more focused on showcasing their craft globally.  One of the defining moments for Japanese watchmaking was the onset of the Quartz Revolution back in the 70s. Seiko is known to be the first brand to ever release a quartz watch and Citizen followed their footsteps just a couple of years later. This opened up countless opportunities for Citizen which eventually led to greater success and more milestones for the brand. From groundbreaking digital models to the first-ever solar-powered watch, the Japanese company has focused on developing their technology to become the renowned name they are today.  Come the 21st century and Citizen has proved that they are not messing around. They’ve engaged in a massive expansion of their assets, purchasing well-known brands and watch groups like Bulova, Frédérique Constant, Arnold & Son, and more. The Japanese brand is also famous for its partnerships and collaborations with sports institutes, sports teams, and even Disney. When it comes to reputation, they are highly regarded today for their sustainable, eco-friendly, and reliable timepieces.  All About the Citizen Promaster The specific model we’ll be talking about in this article belongs to Citizen’s Promaster line. Before we delve into the Citizen NY0040 itself, let’s take a closer look at the Promaster collection.  The Citizen Promaster is regarded as one of the best that the brand has to offer. It consists of a selection of sports (and diving) watches that showcase Citizen’s technological prowess. The Promaster was officially launched in 1989, although some argue that this line actually dates back to the late 1950s when the Citizen Parashock and Parawater models came out. Regardless, there were 3 different Promaster models released in 1989: the Promaster Aqualand, the Promaster Altrichron, and the Promaster Sky. These pieces were specifically designed for professionals who were constantly in harsh environments whether it be land, air, or sea. It was marketed as the result of Citizen’s unwavering research and innovations in the last few decades.  Since then, this series has been home to numerous revolutionary pieces such as the Promaster Navihawk, the Promaster Amphibian, the Promaster Cyber Aqualand, and lots more.  What is the Citizen NY0040?  The Citizen NY0040, also known as the Promaster NY0040, was first launched back in 1997. It is a widely known model, especially within the watch community because of its distinctive physical features. Despite being released over 20 years ago, the NY0040 is surprisingly still being offered today, albeit with slight variations from the original. To the unfamiliar eye, this watch might seem like any other sports watch in the market, especially since it has aesthetic attributes similar to that of a typical diving model. However, there is definitely more than meets the eye with this timepiece simply because Citizen always manages to add a splash of Japanese workmanship to its pieces. Everything about the Citizen NY0040 is an expert Japanese take on sports watches, so you know it’s built to last. Let’s take a closer look, shall we?   Citizen Promaster NY0040 Specs Case Material: Stainless Steel Diameter: 42mm Case Thickness:12mm Strap Material: Rubber (Urethan) Movement: Automatic | Miyota Calibre 8203 Power Reserve: 45 hours Water Resistance: 200 meters Exterior: Case & Bracelet The Citizen NY0040 actually comes in two variations — the NY0040-09EE and the NY0040-17LE — with the first sporting a mostly traditional black look and the second mostly in blue. Just like most sports watches, this model sports quite a rugged exterior but with an aura of professional class at the same time. It is a versatile piece that would look great with an everyday outfit or even a smart-casual ensemble. The Citizen NY0040 comes in a stainless steel case that has a diameter of 42mm, a thickness of 12mm, and 20mm lugs. These numbers may seem intimidating but it is in fact an ideal size for a men’s diving watch. Furthermore, it also has a one-way rotating aluminium bezel in smooth matte black with a luminescent pip in lieu of the 60-minute marker. The material and the design of the gear-shaped edges of the bezel were chosen for optimal visibility and ease of use when underwater.  Moving on, the dial is protected by mineral crystal glass which has scratch-resistant properties. On the rear of the watch is a solid caseback with engravings of the Citizen Promaster logo and other information regarding the specifications of the watch. One of the most distinctive features of the NY0040 is the position of its crown. In most watches, the crown is placed at the 4 o’clock position but this model has its crown on the opposite side at 8 o’clock. This was purposefully done to cater to left-handed individuals whilst also providing better comfort in general.  Lastly, the Citizen NY0040 comes with a high-quality rubber strap which is perfect for the harsh conditions of diving. Bracelets and straps are very important things to consider, especially when you’re looking for a durable sports timepiece. Rubber is the usual choice of strap when it comes to dive watches, while leather and steel are not recommended. Another great thing about the NY0040’s strap is that it has no-decompression limits, making it incredibly durable at any depth. Overall, making use of a rubber strap for the NY0040 was definitely a conscious decision on Citizen’s part in order to promote better functionality and reliability.  Dial The focus on ease of use did not stop with the materials and exterior of the Citizen NY0040. Each and every component in the dial was also designed with readability and comfort in mind. If you are familiar with watches, all you need is a single glance at the dial to know that the NY0040 is indubitably a diver’s watch. As mentioned, the NY0040 comes in classic shades of either black or blue, with both variants sporting a matte finish to avoid reflective light glares. It follows a typical analog layout with big luminescent hands and hour markers in various shapes. You can also find a day and date display at 3 o’clock. This aperture is presented as a black background with red text to indicate the day and white text for the date, adding a splash of color that to the dial that makes for better readability.  While most of the elements in the dial scream “diving watch”, it is also clear that Citizen kept the Citizen NY0040 versatile enough to be used both on land and underwater. It is a great option for people, especially divers, who don’t like changing their watches on a daily basis.  Movement The newest Citizen NY0040 is powered by a Miyota 8203 caliber automatic movement. It consists of around 21 jewels to reduce excessive wear and tear and has a frequency of 21600 beats per hour, which boasts a relatively high accuracy. Lastly, it has an impressive power reserve of 45 hours.  Citizen NY0040 vs Seiko SRP367 Baby Tuna The Citizen NY0040 is often compared with the Seiko SKX007 but, today, let’s switch it up by putting it against the ever-so-popular Seiko Baby Tuna. Both are renowned sports watches but today, we’ll see which is the better diver.  Seiko SRP637 ‘Baby Tuna’ Specs Case Material: Stainless Steel Case Dimension: 47.5mm x 13.5mm x 50mm Strap: Stainless Steel  Movement: Automatic Power Reserve: 42 hours Water Resistance: 200 meters Exterior With a case diameter of 47.5mm, the Seiko Baby Tuna is definitely heftier than the Citizen NY0040. The Seiko Baby Tuna also looks a lot more robust and rugged compared to the NY0040, which leans towards a more classic sports watch style. Both are made from hardy stainless steel and have unidirectional bezels with luminous pips at the 60-minute marker. A key difference between the two, however, is that the Baby Tuna has a crown at 4 o’clock while the Citizen NY0040’s crown is at 8 o’clock. In addition, the NY0040 has a mineral crystal to protect the dial while the Baby Tuna makes use of Seiko’s patented Hardlex crystal.  In terms of the strap, the Seiko Baby Tuna comes with a stainless steel bracelet while the Citizen NY0040 has a rubber strap. As mentioned, this is a crucial factor because some strap materials are more ideal for diving than others. However, it should be noted that the Baby Tuna has a clasp with a folding expansion feature which allows for a more snug fit around your wrist, even when you are wearing a wet suit.   Dial Moving on to the dial area, both models follow a standard dive watch layout with an analog display. Just like the Citizen NY0040, the Seiko SRP637 also has large, luminescent hands and hour markers. However, the Seiko Baby Tuna uses rectangular shapes while the NY0040 has mostly circular ones. Lastly, the Seiko model has a day and date window with a stark white background and black text while the NY0040 has one with a black background.  Technical Specifications When it comes to features and functions, it is safe to say that both are equally impressive. The two models each offer water-resistance of up to 200 meters and power reserves of over 40 hours. Both are also equipped with in-house Japanese calibers that follow automatic movements.  Prices This is probably where they differ most. The Seiko Baby Tuna SRP637 is priced at over $800 USD online today while the Citizen NY0040 retails at not more than $250 USD.  Verdict It is undeniable that both timepieces are excellent but, at the end of the day, it all boils down to what you consider worth it or not. In this case, I would have to go with Citizen NY0040 because it’s the more classic and sophisticated model between the two. It is an amazing diver’s watch but it’s also very versatile which means you can wear it on a variety of occasions. The best part is you get great functions and design without having to break the bank, as opposed to the Seiko Baby Tuna, which is considerably more expensive than the NY0040. Who should buy the Citizen NY0040?  Citizen Patrons. If you’re a fan of Citizen, then owning any piece from the Promaster collection is definitely the dream, given its rich history. Out of Citizen’s diverse catalogue, the NY0040 is one of their most recognizable models and it has been in the market for over 20 years now. The fact that it is still available today and is loved by so many just shows how well this timepiece has withstood the test of time. With that being said, the NY0040 is certainly a must-have for Citizen patrons out there! Professional and Leisure Divers. The Citizen NY0040 is a great starter watch for both professional and casual divers out there. It has all the elements and components of a great diving watch and it boasts quality Japanese craftsmanship as well. You get precision, ease of use, durability, and easy readability for under $300 USD. Sports Watch Enthusiasts. For individuals who are just in the beginning stages of their sports watch collection, the Citizen NY0040 is an excellent choice to consider. The NY0040 has a good story and rich heritage behind it, plus it belongs to a highly-regarded watch series from a renowned brand. Furthermore, this model is a popular one among the watch community so it makes for a great conversation topic. Final Thoughts  The Citizen NY0040 is a versatile-looking sports watch that’s equipped with equally excellent features. The Japanese brand truly found the perfect balance between functionality and aesthetics with this timepiece. It is perfectly understandable why it is still being produced and sold in the market even after over two decades. Ultimately, the Citizen NY0040 is a great model to own regardless of whether you’re a diver or not.  If you’re interested in Japanese timepieces, make sure to read our article on The Orient Mako II. Photo Credits: Citizen Official Website

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  8. Grand Seiko SBGH267 Review: Accuracy and Grandeur

    Grand Seiko SBGH267 Review: Accuracy and Grandeur

    In 2018, Grand Seiko celebrated the 20th anniversary of the launch of the iconic in-house caliber 9S automatic movement. With this celebration came the release of new, upgraded limited edition timepieces, to the delight of many fans. These are all models that are definitely made for luxury, using top-tier materials, and designed with undeniable finesse. Among the watches released for the 20th anniversary of the caliber 9S, the platinum VFA watch and the Special Standard gold timepiece stand out. These two models are — without a doubt — more expensive than other watches during the drop. However, the most stunning piece, without a doubt, is the Grand Seiko SBGH267. This timepiece displays Grand Seiko’s excellence when it comes to crafting stainless steel watches. It simply isn’t possible to find a Grand Seiko watch that’s subpar in the design department. The company prides itself on producing high-quality, meticulously designed watches that could easily compete with Swiss luxury watch manufacturers. Even among the catalog of exquisite and lavish luxury watches the Grand Seiko has, however, the Grand Seiko SBGH267 is still a standout. This watch is magnificently simple at its finest. Reviewing the Grand Seiko SBGH267 alone would be pointless without touching on the caliber 9S itself. How can a movement be so iconic that it deserved a new, updated release even 20 years later? Let’s examine the beginnings of Grand Seiko, how the company came up with the caliber 9S, and how it has influenced the creation of the Grand Seiko SBGH267. What makes this movement so iconic? History of the Caliber 9S The release of the in-house caliber 9S is one of Grand Seiko’s most prominent milestones and for good reason. For a long time, it was the standard movement used in all Grand Seiko watches. The caliber 9S’s excellent performance and innovative design made it a favorite in the horology community. The creation of this movement is one of the many achievements that truly put Grand Seiko on the map as a brand that could compete with more prominent Swiss luxury brands, proving that Grand Seiko is just as much about top-of-the-line innovation as it is about luxurious designs. Let’s take a closer look at Grand Seiko and how the caliber 9S really came to be. The Beginnings of Grand Seiko When Grand Seiko launched, Seiko Corporation had already made a name for itself in the Japanese market as a manufacturer of clocks and gauges. Seiko Corporation was well on its way to carving out an important place in the watch industry. In order to promote competition within the corporation, which would lead to improved and better quality products for all of the Seiko brand, the company opened two subsidiaries. These subsidiaries were named Suwa Seikosha and Daini Seikosha, and each operated completely independently of the other. Seiko’s strategy worked, as the competition between the two subsidiaries pushed each to come up with more out-of-the-box thinking and present different solutions to horological challenges. As a result, Seiko was met with increasing success as a horological innovator. Among the two subsidiaries, Suwa Seikosha was the more prominent name, and it was Suwa Seikosha that came up with Grand Seiko in 1960. However, ultimately, the inventions and efforts of both subsidiaries were crucial to the formation of Grand Seiko as a brand. In 1960, Suwa Seikosha created the first Grand Seiko watch, known simply as the Grand Seiko (GS) 1960, fitted with the caliber 3180 movements. This movement was the first chronometer-grade caliber produced in Japan. Such a watch, of course, cost a great deal. In today’s dollars, it cost around $3,500 USD. This was quite an exorbitant price for Seiko Corporation, which had, up till then, produced mainly mid-range watches. However, this soon became the standard of Grand Seiko watches — luxury watches that were more expensive than the offerings from its sister brand Seiko, that could easily compete with Swiss luxury watches. Grand Seiko’s Milestones The Grand Seiko 1960 was an impressive watch, even by today’s standards. The watch had a two-phase regulator mechanism. It was also outfitted with a hacking mechanism, which means that the movement could be instantly stopped when you pulled on the crown. This allowed you to more accurately set the time of the watch. Suwa Seikosha, however, was insatiable and constantly seeking new ways to improve upon this watch. In 1963, Suwa developed the 57GS. It is a low-bear hand-wound wristwatch released under the Grand Seiko brand. The 57GS is far different from the first-generation GS. With the 57GS, Suwa innovated by creating a luxury wristwatch encased within a stainless steel case. Keep in mind that this watch was launched in 1963. The first Swiss luxury watch with a stainless steel case — the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak — wouldn’t be released for another 9 years, making Suwa a true pioneer with the design of the 57GS. The 57GS has a screw-down caseback, replacing the old snap-back crown of the first-generation Grand Seiko. As a result, it provided better water resistance, up to depths of 50 meters. It also featured an automatically changing date. The movement also earned its certification as a chronometer. In 1966, certain changes were made to the 57GS movement. Suwa increased the beat rating of the movement to 19,800 from 18,000, but the movement also lost its chronometer certification. In 1966, the 62GS was launched. The 62GS’s design stood out with its tiny crown unusually positioned at 4 o’clock. It was also the first Grand Seiko watch to function with an automatic movement. At the time, Grand Seiko had already become a popular choice, not only in Japan but also in other parts of the world. From there, the innovations from the brand just kept pouring in, building further upon the reputation of Grand Seiko as a quality manufacturer of luxury watches that constantly sought to upgrade itself. Launching the Caliber 9S Now, the previous few watches from the brand that we’ve discussed were definitely game-changers. They placed Grand Seiko firmly on the map as a luxury watch brand to keep an eye on. However, the Grand Seiko’s distinctive style wasn’t quite there yet. We’re talking about the distinguishing aesthetics and physical design of Grand Seiko watches. Sure, GS had already released a number of luxury timepieces but they were very much a callback to the conservative designs popularized by Swiss brands. So, in 1967, the company launched the 44GS — the watch that truly defined the Grand Seiko’s own style. There are three main features from the 44GS that made the brand stand out from its competition. It was a truly iconic watch that allowed light to play beautifully off its surface no matter the day, time, or place. Firstly, the 44GS features flat surfaces that are true to their definitions — two-dimensional and extremely flat. Within the dial, the hands and hour markers of the watch were also designed to be wide and flat on the surface of the dial. However, the polished edges of the watch still allowed light to reflect off them well. Finally, the 44GS had distortion-free mirrored surfaces achieved through Zaratsu polishing. On top of its high-precision calibers, Grand Seiko made a step forward with the 44GS by improving upon their watches’ aesthetic designs, making them truly worthy of the luxury status. From there, the company took a break due to the debut and increasing popularity of quartz movements. For the next 30 years, Grand Seiko took a backseat to let Seiko ride the tides to greatness with their quartz watches. However, this break didn’t cause Grand Seiko to disappear. Instead, the brand took its time to enhance the performance of its mechanical calibers. Grand Seiko used various tests to improve upon the performance of their movements. Moreover, their engineers and designers created a new balance spring that featured a special curved shape. These innovations resulted in the launch of a brand new mechanical caliber, the 9S5 series, which was first launched in 1998. The Caliber 9S Series The 9S5 caliber proved to be a great addition to Grand Seiko. In later developments, the brand also produced a new SPRON alloy for the mainspring as well as a new escapement, perfected with the advanced Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. New Caliber 9S versions continued to be released with different upgrades, such as the 9S6 with its 72-hour power reserve. The 9S8 also proved impressive with an improved 10-beat movement. The 9S caliber series proved to be the new Grand Seiko standard, with impressive accuracy that went beyond simple chronometer certification. Truly, it was on a different scale from the 1966 standards set by its predecessor. 20th Anniversary Models To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the 9S mechanical caliber, Grand Seiko launched three new, limited-edition models of Grand Seiko watches in 2018. Each contained a different, special and newly-released 9S caliber movement, encased within distinctive 20mm cases. The first model is a Hi-Beat 36,000 VFA Ref. SBGH265J. This watch, which comes in a platinum case, is a truly rare collector’s piece, with only 20 pieces released on the market. It bears the V.F.A. initials on the dial, which stands for Very Fine Adjusted. This abbreviation was first used in 1969. This abbreviation refers to the precision rate of the caliber, that exceeds that of the Grand Seiko Standard. Powered by the 9S85 Hi-Beat 36,000 Caliber, it boasts an accuracy rate of +3 to -1 seconds per day. Then, there’s the Hi-Beat 36000 Special Ref. SBGH266J. Now, this is a classy yellow-gold watch, limited to only 150 pieces. This watch contains the movement commonly known as the Grand Seiko Special Standard. That means that the watch has an accuracy of around +4 to -2 seconds per day. Finally, the main star of our article: the Grand Seiko Hi-Beat 36000 Ref. SBGH267G. It features a clean, traditional stainless steel case. Grand Seiko only released 1,500 pieces of this watch. The SBGH267G’s movement features a different, unusual oscillating weight made from titanium and tungsten. This weight comes in exquisite blue, due to anodic oxidation, which generates an oxide film via the process of electrolysis. We’ll be taking an in-depth look at the Grand Seiko SBGH267G, and all the great features it brings to the table. Reviewing the Grand Seiko SBGH267 The Grand Seiko SBGH267 Limited Edition truly has its wonderful features, whether that’s due to the exquisite Grand Seiko design or the outstanding and distinctive movement. There’s something special about this stainless steel offering that makes it even more appealing than its higher-priced siblings. For sure, the VFA model in platinum and the Special Standard in gold are both true collector’s items. However, the SBGH267, with its more classic Grand Seiko look and equally outstanding performance, is the one that watch enthusiasts should really keep their eye on. First Impressions Right off the bat, it’s easy to see that this is a quality watch. We do have a lot of expectations with this watch, however. It’s a Grand Seiko watch with an iteration of the 9S and that alone bears more weight than it just being a limited edition watch. 9S is the first movement the Grand Seiko has released after 40 years of staying still. It features 36,000 vibrations per hour. The SBGH267 itself not overly fancy but its clean, professional exterior made from stainless steel is definitely luxurious, from its look to its texture and feel. Sure, the gold and the platinum models might seem more elegant at first glance. However, this is an equally refined offering with little details that truly make it a luxury watch hailing from the east. Grand Seiko SBGH267 Specs Before we get to our complete review of this watch, let’s first take a look at its specifications: Model: Hi-Beat 36000, Caliber 9S 20th Anniversary Limited EditionReference Number: SBGH267Case Diameter: 39.5 mmCase Thickness: 13 mmCase Material: Stainless steel, Zaratsu polishedIndexes: Baton, laser polishedDial Color: Deep blueWater Resistance: 100 meters, 330 feet, 10ATMStrap/Bracelet: Three-link stainless steel bracelet Movement Caliber: 9S85Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, datePower Reserve: 55 hoursFrequency: 5 Hz (36,000 vph)Accuracy: +5 to -3 seconds per day Jewels: 37Diameter: 28.4 mmWinding: Automatic winding with tungsten and anodized titanium oscillating weightInformation: MEMS fabricated skeletonized escape wheel with micro-oil reservoir teeth, and MEMS fabricated skeletonized leverChronometer Certification: Grand Seiko Hi-Beat internally controlled Case The case of the Grand Seiko SBGH267 is quite similar to the two other watches from the limited edition drop. Each watch carries a similar Grand Seiko Style that no other brand could emulate. We’re talking about the unusual designs we mentioned earlier — two-dimensional, impossibly flat and thin, and mirror-like in polish. In particular, Grand Seiko’s method of polishing their watches can only be achieved through Zaratsu polishing. Zaratsu polishing has existed even before the beginnings of Grand Seiko. During the 1950s, the Hayashi Seiko factory had a polishing machine that had the words GEBR.SALLAZ engraved on it. This is the very place where a great deal of Grand Seiko watches are being manufactured. GEBR. stands for a German word that means “brothers.” Meanwhile, SALLAZ was the family name of the company that had built the machine. Indeed, the word Zaratsu was derived from the way the Japanese pronounced SALLAZ. This polishing machine became prominent for one very clear reason. Instead of the sides of the rotating disc used to polish watches, the machine uses the front of the disk to polish the surfaces of the case watch. This allowed for a very distinct polish that provides exceptionally crisp case lines and a mirror-like reflection to whoever is looking at the case of the watch. No distortions, no weird faces. This method of polishing became what we popularly know today as the Zaratsu polishing. Now, not everyone can achieve this, that’s why it’s so unique to the Grand Seiko brand. Only the machine and Grand Seiko’s master craftsmen can make this work. Dial The dial of the Grand Seiko SBGH267 has a very unique motif. On the dial, you can find spiral engraving with letters of the Grand Seiko logo, along with the mark of Daini Seikosha. Daini is the other half of Grand Seiko and was responsible for developing the first Hi-Beat movement. The company is now known as Seiko Instruments Inc. The design of the dial is unparalleled; it comes in an exquisite, textured deep blue color like no other. What we love about this design is that it successfully invokes luxury and class without having to use any precious metals at all. It doesn’t come in the usual gold, platinum, or even silver that is frequently used in luxury watches. It’s just a blue dial with a really great design that speaks for itself and adds even more dimension to an already impressive watch. Furthermore, as you might’ve noticed, the baton hands are not simply rectangular metal markers applied on the dial. They’re also raised to a height that adds volume and layers to an otherwise minimalistic watch. Even the date aperture comes with the same three-dimensional design, protruding out from the face of the dial. Once again, this is where the Grand Seiko Style comes in. You can see the light play off every part of the watch — the shadows on the engraved dial, as well as the reflections on the sharp, polished edges of every marker and hand. The GS logo at the 12 o’clock position and the second hand both come in fine gold. It allows both to stand out from the stainless steel casing and markers, as well as the blue dial, giving the watch an aura of sophistication. Movement Now, the dial of the Grand Seiko SBGH267 is already very impressive. However, there’s nothing like a high-quality movement to make it all better. We’ve already gone through the makings and history of the 9S movements. Since this watch a tribute to that, we know that the same movement powers this watch. It displays a high level of accuracy and precision, as well as a power reserve that lasts up to 55 hours. The 9S85 caliber movement on this watch doesn’t have quite the same accuracy and precision as the Very Fine Adjusted or Special models. However, Grand Seiko fans know that the performance of Grand Seiko movements frequently outperforms the standards which are promised. Grand Seiko watches are always better in practice than on the brochure, and this is no different. It is worth noting, though, that the movement of the SBGH267 stands out from the others as a particularly beautiful deep blue-colored movement that matches the blue motif of the dial. It has an anodized titanium and tungsten rotor as can be seen on the see-through caseback. This is very similar to the rotor of the 10th Anniversary GMT Grand Seiko. Although its caliber underperforms slightly compared to the Very Fine Adjusted and Special models, its gorgeous hue and more affordable pricing make the SBGH267 a very good deal still. Pricing The Grand Seiko SBGH267 is a limited edition, Hi-Beat watch. That means that it’s bound to have a fairly high asking price. With only 1,500 editions available, it costs around 6,300 USD in retail. Now, that’s what you get for a luxurious, well-made, bang-for-the-buck wristwatch from Grand Seiko. Compared to other models like Rolex, the price isn’t that exorbitant and it definitely has a promising future ahead of it. Is the Grand Seiko SBGH267 a great investment piece? The easy answer to this question is yes. The Grand Seiko SBGH267 is a great investment piece. This isn’t only because it’s a limited edition, though. For a long time, since the formation of Grand Seiko as a brand, its watches have long been in the line of sight of collectors. This adds the SBGH267 to the same pedestal. Indeed, reports have shown that, in the years after its release, collectors are certainly keen to pay more than the retail price of this timepiece just to own it. Right now, you can purchase one for around 8,800 to 9,000 USD. And that’s just a couple years since its debut. We look forward to seeing just how this watch will be valued in the future — we certainly expect it to just keep rising! Grand Seiko SBGH267: Accuracy and Grandeur in One Perfect Package This release from Grand Seiko is definitely one for the books. It displays everything we expect from the brand — an equally luxurious and functional watch without the sky-high prices of Swiss brands. What we can see with this watch is the future of Japanese luxury watch manufacturers. The SBGH267 forces Swiss watch purists to look their way and see just what else Grand Seiko has in store for the horology community. Can’t get enough of Grand Seiko? Learn 3 reasons why we love Grand Seiko! Photo credits: All photos courtesy of Grand Seiko’s official website.

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  9. 6 Best Seiko Kinetic Watches for the Modern Collector

    6 Best Seiko Kinetic Watches for the Modern Collector

    Ask any watch enthusiast about the biggest inventors in the industry and the name Seiko is sure to come up. This is the company responsible for the creation of the quartz movement. It also introduced the cutting-edge technology of radio solar-powered timepieces. Seiko simply never stops looking for ways to innovate in the industry. Today, we’ll take a closer look at one of its most impressive inventions to date: Seiko Kinetic watches. As Seiko continues to provide people with watches that function with utmost efficiency, it never forgets to create new technology as well. The Seiko Kinetic joins the roster of Seiko’s quality conceptualisations, alongside its mechanical, quartz, and solar movements. As you can expect, Seiko put great effort into developing this ingenious movement. So, without further ado, let us walk you through everything you need to know about Seiko Kinetic. We’ve also come up with a list of 6 of the best Kinetic watches from the brand that you’ll surely love. To fully understand the idea of Kinetic watches, let’s take a look at its history alongside the company’s track record of innovations. Seiko: Disrupting the Watch Industry Since the invention of watches, watchmakers have always been on the lookout for ways to change the game up. This is because watches are engineering marvels and there are endless ways to make them better. Even to this day, manufacturers still manage to find ways to improve how we keep and perceive time through these little devices. Seiko, as one of these aforementioned manufacturers, has spearheaded the charge on many of these technological advances in the horology industry. Seiko’s Notable Innovations Kintaro Hattori founded Seiko in 1881 as a watch and clock retail and repair store. The company grew with the help of foreign trading companies, importing popular Western timepieces into Japan. From the beginning, the company had been marking many firsts, not only for Japan but also for the rest of the world. In 1894, the company constructed a store that had a clock tower. Located on the corner of Ginza 4-chome block, this clock tower became known as a classic landmark. In 1913, as the trend of pocket watches was slowly dying, the company launched The Laurel, Japan’s first-ever wristwatch. The Laurel was just the beginning of Seiko’s iconic run as a wristwatch manufacturer. Fast forward to 1964, when Seiko became the official timer of the Tokyo Olympics. This was the first time ever that electronic timepieces were fully integrated into the games. After this momentous feat, Seiko went on to serve as the official timer for 5 other Olympic Games. Only 4 years later in 1968, Seiko launched the world’s first quartz wall clock. It was also this year that Seiko occupied the top spot for mechanical watch precision at the Geneva Observatory Competition. With the company on a roll, in 1969, Seiko launched the Quartz Astron, the world’s first quartz watch. Those familiar with watch history will know that the launch of the Quartz Astron took a toll on the Swiss watch industry. Quartz watches caught on remarkably quickly, and the mechanical watches of many Swiss watch manufacturers were rapidly overtaken. Many years later, the rest of the world — especially the Swiss watch market — began rolling out their very own quartz-powered watches. Seiko itself continued to put out ground-breaking tech almost every decade. In the 1970s, Seiko developed the world’s first radio wave clock. Then, at the 1986 Basel Fair, Seiko unveiled its first Kinetic prototype. Other historic Seiko milestones include the invention of the Astron (the world’s first GPS solar watch, 2012) and the world’s first satellite radio wave clock in 2014. Their most recent milestone is their creation of the world’s first hybrid radio wave clock in 2019. History of Seiko Kinetic Everything began at the 1986 Basel Fair when Seiko unveiled the first kinetic prototype it had been working on. At that time, the prototype carried the name “AGM” (Automatic Generating Movement). It was the first watch that was capable of converting kinetic movement into electrical energy. The prototype was Seiko’s way of introducing this technology to the world. 20 years later, it would become synonymous with excellent performance and convenience. Moreover, along with solar powered-watches, kinetic watches also became the poster child for eco-conscious watchmaking standards. Two years after they unveiled their prototype, Seiko went on to launch the first-ever kinetic watch available commercially. This new watch went by the name “AGS” (Automatic Generating System”), rather than the aforementioned AGM. Over the years, Seiko sold 8 million units of the original AGS. It wasn’t until 1991 that Seiko officially rebranded the AGS into the Seiko Kinetic, as we know it by today. In 1998, Seiko launched the Kinetic Auto Relay. The highlight of this new watch was the improvement in the at-rest operating period of the watch. Seiko extended this to 4 whopping years. Then, just one year later, in 1999, they released the Ultimate Kinetic Chronograph — the watch that had the best of both worlds. This watch made use of both mechanical and electronic watchmaking methods. A new generation Kinetic Chronograph was launched in 2003, carrying with it the same idea. 2005 marked another milestone for the brand as the Kinetic Perpetual was released. The appearance of this watch leaned more towards traditional dress watches. With the power of kinetic energy plus the longevity of a perpetual calendar, this is a timepiece that is definitely meant to last. During its release, Seiko promised that this watch will never have to be corrected until the year 2100, almost a hundred years in the future. Finally, in 2007, the Kinetic Direct Drive launched to great hype and enthusiasm from consumers. Unlike previous kinetic watches, this timepiece allowed the watch to generate energy not just through its electrical mechanisms, but also by winding the crown, as with mechanical movements. What is the Seiko Kinetic? So, how exactly does the Seiko Kinetic watch work? Kinetics pertain to the generation of energy via movement. Every Seiko Kinetic watch contains an internal electrical generator. This generator can be powered by something as simple as the movement of the user’s wrist. The energy generated sits in a rechargeable battery which, unlike cell batteries in quartz movements, doesn’t require frequent replacement. As such, it is also a much more eco-friendly option. Types of Kinetic Watches There are various different Seiko Kinetic watches available today: Ultimate Kinetic Chronograph can store up to 1 month of power.Kinetic Direct Drive can store up to 1 month of charge. It also functions like mechanical movements as you can wind it by physically turning the crown.Kinetic Chronograph can store up to 5 months of power.Kinetic Perpetual stores up to 6 months of charge that can be preserved for 4 years when not in use.Kinetic GMT can preserve its charge for up to 4 years and goes to sleep mode after 72 hours.Kinetic Auto Drive can also preserve its charge for up to 4 years and goes to sleep mode after 72 hours.Kinetic vs Mechanical Movement Kinetic Movement (L) vs Mechanical Movement (R) You might be wondering how the movement of a Seiko Kinetic differs from a typical mechanical movement. Although both movements come with a swinging rotor, one difference between the two lies in the location in which each movement stores power. Mechanical movements store energy in the spring while kinetic watches store it in a capacitor. In an automatic mechanical movement, the rotor moves when the wrist moves. This winds the spring that is responsible for powering up the watch. Manual-winding watches work differently because you’d have to manually turn the crown to wind it. Automatic watches can store power in what we call a power reserve. Depending on how great the power reserve is, you would be able to keep wearing the watch until your power reserve ran low, at which point you would have to turn the crown to wind it up again. For watch enthusiasts who have already amassed a large collection, a watch winder is actually a fantastic idea. This is a device that keeps the watch moving even when you’re not wearing it, such that it remains charged and ready for another day in the field. A kinetic watch works in a fairly similar way. Swinging or moving your arm while wearing a kinetic watch causes the oscillating rotor within the watch to move. With that, several gears start to turn, and this produces electricity via a small generator. This generator charges the capacitor where energy is stored. Just like mechanical movements, kinetic watches have to be constantly worn in order to stay charged. Alternatively, a watch winder also works wonders for this type of movement. Eco-Friendly Choices: Kinetic vs Solar Seiko Kinetic Watch (L), Seiko Solar Watch (R) Kinetic and solar watches are both known for their eco-friendly properties. That being said, for those seeking an environmentally-friendly timepiece, which one is better? The answer, really, is that it depends. Each watch has its own set of pros and cons. For example, Seiko Kinetic watches have to be constantly worn on your wrist or placed on a wrist winder in order to be functional. On the other hand, solar watches need light to recharge, be it artificial or natural light. Solar watch batteries tend to last for a decade on average, and as such, a solar watch is perfect for those who don’t have time to constantly change the batteries of their watches. This is also why most solar watches come with very rugged, sporty designs. As a timepiece intended for people who need unyielding power, solar watches have to be able to function for as long as their adventures do. At the end of the day, choosing one watch over another depends on your personal preference and needs. Kinetic watches are a great idea if you’re looking for something with a little more edge, especially if it’s a Seiko Kinetic Direct Drive that you’re eying. On the other hand, if you’re more of an outdoorsy person or someone who can maintain a constant source of light nearby, then a solar watch might be a better idea for you. 6 Best Seiko Kinetic Watches Seiko is the sole proprietor of kinetic watches, and over the years, they’ve come up with quite an impressive range. So, if you’re finally sold on getting a kinetic watch, you might be a little confused about which one to get. We’ve gathered 6 of the best Seiko Kinetic watches on the market to narrow down your choices! Check them out below. 1. Seiko Prospex SUN023P1 First on the list is the Seiko Prospex Kinetic SUN023P1. As a member of the popular Prospex family, this timepiece is both a kinetic watch and a dive watch. It has a measured diameter of 47mm, not including the crown, so you know that it has a wide and balanced face. This watch also has a protective shroud which gives it a rugged, sportier look. This model is also a part of Seiko’s “tuna can” line of watches. Seiko’s tuna watches are all built to handle professional diving trenches. Every part of this watch is made for professional diving. The band is made from polyurethane and can fit perfectly over wetsuits. Even if you’re not a diver, you won’t have to worry either. The 24mm strap is easily swappable for more conventional straps. The Seiko Prospex Kinetic SUN023P1 also has a power reserve indicator so you can easily tell when your watch is running out of charge. To activate this, you only need to press the button positioned at the 2 o’clock position. The second hand will then point to indicate how much power is left in the watch. To set things into perspective, an indicator of 30 seconds is equivalent to six months of power. Another noticeable detail on the dial of the watch is a fourth hand, sword-shaped and lined with blue. This hand indicates 24-hour time, which is especially convenient for those who are used to military time. As expected, this watch also has a powerful lume. All Seiko watches are blessed with this and the same applies to the Seiko Prospex Kinetic SUN023P1. Moreover, this is extremely useful for those who like to go diving. The only downside to this watch is the small dot on the bezel of the watch at the 12 o’clock position. For such a big watch, a bigger lume-filled dot would be more visible and a lot more helpful, especially underwater. On the whole, this is a great watch that’s perfect for sporty use or adventurous weekends. This timepiece might not be the right fit for more formal settings, but it’s definitely ready for anything it might encounter. 2. Seiko SRH013 Velatura Kinetic Direct Drive Another sporty timepiece on our list, the Seiko Velatura SRH013 features a very modern design. It has a rugged look with an aesthetic that’s reminiscent of sports cars. If you’re a thrill-seeker, then this is just the watch for you. In all black, the watch measures 42mm in diameter. It also comes in a stainless steel case that can withstand just about anything. The black rubber band strap of the Velatura SRH013 is made to look a lot like a threaded tire. Overall, this timepiece features a racing car motif that Seiko handled very well. On the dial is a day-and-date display that is designed to resemble the dashboard of a car, which pairs wonderfully with the concept of the watch. With a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal, this is the perfect adventure watch. The Seiko Velatura SRH013 has a water resistance of 100 meters. That isn’t a lot but it’s definitely enough to handle a little splash here and there. 3. Seiko Prospex SKA413 “Adventure” The Seiko Prospex SKA413 “Adventure” offers just about everything you need from a dive watch. It can handle up to 200 meters of depth. The watch also features a sturdy stainless steel case that can withstand any sort of impacts or scratches. Fitted on the top of this case is a black bezel designed with silver gear-like edges. These edges make it easier to grip and turn the bezel, especially if you’re using a glove or in a wetsuit. This bezel rotates unidirectionally, in an anti-clockwise movement. This is important because it prevents the bezel from being turned in the wrong direction, which would mess up a wearer’s ability to quickly tell the time. The bezel can count up to sixty minutes of elapsed time. As with all Seiko watches, we get a great lume from this watch. Some people might not like the look of the chunky strap, but it does feel extremely comfortable around the wrist. Alternatively, you could also opt to change it according to your preferences. Simply fit a NATO strap or a stainless steel bracelet into the drilled lugs of the watch and you’d be good to go for any adventure you might have planned. 4. Seiko Premier SNP149P2 Perpetual Novak Djokovic Special Edition This watch is one that’s a lot classier and better paired with formal wear than the others on the list. It carries a very conservative aesthetic, from the distinguished month sub-dial to the combination of the refined baton and Roman numeral markers. This is exactly what you would expect from a special edition watch released by Seiko. We’re talking, of course, about the Seiko Premier Kinetic Novac Djokovic. It is a total feast for the eyes. This tasteful dress watch was made for Serbian tennis legend Novak Djokovic. At the time of this article’s release, Djokovic is ranked the world’s No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals. He has been sitting at that position for a record of 327 weeks. Djokovic has also finished as year-end No. 1 on an Open Era joint record on six occasions. This watch also comes with another sub-dial that displays 24 hours. The date display is prominently placed on the dial, at the 12 o’clock position, and comes with a stylish bronze-colored metal frame. It truly expresses a sophisticated look that is perfect for the winner that it was made for. 5. Seiko Prospex SUN065 GMT PADI There’s a lot to unpack with the Seiko SUN065. This is yet another Prospex watch — this time made in collaboration with PADI (Professional Association of Diving Instructors). This timepiece looks stunning, especially underwater, with its combination of blue and silver aesthetics. It is a great timepiece that uses the Seiko Kinetic movement — the Kinetic GMT variation in particular. This means that the watch can display a second time zone which is great for those who are always out on adventures all over the world. This watch features an analog dial display. Fully charged, the power of this timepiece can last for 6 long months. To check how much juice you have left, you only need to press the push-button at 2 o’clock. Finally, at 47.5 mm, it’s a large and rather hefty watch. It can also go as deep as 200 meters — indeed the ultimate dive watch. 6. Seiko Coutura SRN066 Kinetic Retrograde So far, we’ve introduced to you some of the best dive watches that are powered by kinetic movement. However, some people aren’t looking for just a tool watch. Instead, they seek more classic timepieces that have fool-proof timepieces. If that’s the type of kinetic watch you’re looking for, then we bring to you Seiko Coutura SRN066 Kinetic Retrograde. This is a great timepiece that offers a classy yet modern design, perfect for more formal occasions. The Coutura SRN066 Kinetic Retrograde has a sapphire-crystal window and is resistant to water up to depths of 100 meters. So, even though it’s not a diving watch, it can handle a bit of moisture. You can take a quick dip with this watch and not have to worry about damaging it at all. This watch also comes with a day-and-date display. As a dressy watch, you can expect the watch to lack lume. The only lume you can find is on the elegant hands of the watch. It may be a challenge to tell time with this watch in the dark but it’s definitely perfect for your next suit and tie event. Seiko Kinetic: A Universal Game-changer Seiko Kinetic watches are perfect for people who are becoming more conscious of their carbon footprint. It’s also a great watch that keeps people active and moving. It is clear just why Seiko put the effort and time into creating this technology. It’s a lot more cost-efficient than mechanical movements and just as powerful. While we look forward to seeing just how much further Seiko can improve on the Seiko Kinetic, it must be said that what they have for us today is already an impressive lineup. Interested in checking out more Seiko watches? Take a look at our guide to the Seiko Samurai: A Review of One of Seiko’s Best Diver’s Watches. Photo credits to Seiko’s official website

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  10. The New Trio Seiko Alpinist Models: A Collector’s Guide in 2021

    The New Trio Seiko Alpinist Models: A Collector’s Guide in 2021

    Seiko has been a trusted brand of watches for countless years. Many have adorned this brand because its pieces come at very affordable prices with consistently high quality. Since its first release, the Seiko Alpinist has been immensely popular, gaining many positive reviews from popular sites and magazines. Now, the newest release of the Seiko Alpinist has become the talk of the town, especially for watch collectors. Pay close attention, as we tell you everything you need to know about the three newest models of the Seiko Alpinist. Seiko Alpinist’s Old Models The Seiko Alpinist was first released back in 1959. It was designed as a traditional sports watch, intended to meet every mountain climber’s and recreational athlete’s needs. Although it was initially made for the Japanese market, the Seiko Alpinist’s popularity quickly spread beyond the borders of Japan.   The original design of the Seiko Alpinist had a screw-back case and a sturdy leather cuff band.  Luminous inserts could be found in the indexes, hour and minute hands, and the remarkable mountain-shaped markers at the three, six, nine, and twelve o’clock positions. These particular designs were made to give the watch more classic aesthetic and greater durability, preventing dust or small particles from entering the case and protecting it from any moisture and water. These designs remain incredibly popular even today, pushing Seiko to apply them to the new Seiko Alpinist-inspired models.  New Seiko Alpinist-Inspired Models Originally designed as a traditional sports watch, the Seiko Alpinist’s design has evolved over the years, from a traditional sports watch to a highly functional watch that fully embodies the Seiko Prospex collection today. The re-created Seiko Alpinist features an upscaled quality, and these new wristwatches join the ranks of other innovative collections under the brand, such as the Seiko Presage. In fact, these timepieces are the hybrid models of the Prospex series. One notable change to the new Seiko Alpinist watches is the elimination of the “Alpinist” label on the dial or caseback. Instead, they are now referred to as Alpinist-inspired watches. Nevertheless, the iconic markers, dials, rings, straps, and indexes are still made with the same designs as their predecessors.  Get to Know More About the Recreation of 1959 Seiko Alpinist Did you know that the original Seiko Alpinist watches paved the way for Seiko to enter into the sports watch arena? Its first-ever model was introduced in 1959 as part of the Laurel collection. This particular collection from Seiko was among the first in the watch industry to produce an enamel dial produced by the company itself. This collection was especially well-received by the public because of how the watches were well-designed. Its popularity as a trailblazer led the brand to develop more sports watches and other timing devices for sports such as the Seiko 5 Sports. In 2003, another batch of Seiko Alpinist watches was produced, this time featuring a quartz movement. The watches possessed a high-precision caliber movement 8F56 with a frequency of 196,609. A few of its remarkable features included the GMT function and perpetual calendar. And unlike the modern Seiko Alpinist watches, the 2003 models featured a titanium case and bracelet with 100-meter water resistance. The 2003 batch was only available in two versions: Seiko Alpinist SBCJ021 (cream dial) and SBCJ019 (black dial) with illumination.  The third generation of Alpinist watches was released in 2006. Now, these watches—SARB017, SARB013, and SARB015—were the most famous among all, especially the SARB017, nicknamed the “Alpinist Green” for its green dial. It featured different dials and as well as upgraded movement and indices. Unfortunately, the production of these watches was discontinued by Seiko in 2018. Most recently, in 2020, Seiko released a new collection of what they label as “Alpinist-inspired” watches, marketed as part of Seiko’s Prospex line. The famous SPB117, SPB119, and SPB121 bear the 6R35 caliber movement and a cyclops (magnifier) over the 3 o’clock date aperture. The SPB117 stands out among all as it is the only model that has a different bracelet and indices. Read more below to find out about these watches. New Features of Seiko Alpinist-Inspired Models Seiko itself announced that they made a considerable number of changes to the watches. It is available in three different models: green dial (SPB121), black dial (SPB117), and gray dial (SPB119). Some of the changes that you should look out for include: New automatic 6R35 caliber movementUpgraded power reserve up to 70 hoursUse of stainless steel materialSlimmer casesTwin crown set upCyclops over the date windowEach model has its own unique characteristics that would perfectly match its owner while staying consistent with the line’s overall hybrid design and layout.  SPB117 Model What to look for in your Seiko Alpinist SPB117 model: Three-link oyster braceletMountain-shaped indicesSmall Prospex “X” logo on the dialCathedral-styled handsThe SPB117 shows a different dial design than the other models. This is also the only watch that comes with a stainless steel Seiko Alpinist’s bracelet with oyster-styled links, making it versatile enough to be worn by both men and women who have outfit variations. The links of the bracelet are sturdy, measuring 20mm lug width, which is thinner than other watches. The three-link bracelet is all-brushed, easy to wear, and gives a smooth, functional feel.  The sought-after black dial does not have the usual Arabic or Roman numerals; it simply has the triangular indexes that are inspired by the Seiko Alpinist models. The iconic red “20 bar” label is found below the “X” symbol that marks this as a Prospex watch. An outer compass ring is present in the bezel with two rings of markings. The inner marks every one degree, while the outer ring marks every 15 degrees. Like the previous Alpinists, the SPB117 has cathedral-style hands with a luminescent feature generously applied up to the tips. A newly-styled date display window shows a larger numeral on a white background. All these are enclosed with a 39.5 mm stainless steel and a Seiko Alpinist’s 46mm lug to lug case, which is water-resistant up to 200m, or 660ft. Lastly, you do not need to worry about the readability of the numerals, since a magnifier is included in the new features. All of these wearable features from the SPB117 come with just $750. SPB119 Model What to look for in your Seiko Alpinist SPB119 model: White dialHuge Arabic numerals on even numbersRotating compass bezelCathedral style handsThe Seiko SPB119 is another professional watch Seiko has added to their collection. It is a 39.5mm watch that showcases a very clean and sleek design. One unique feature of the SPB119 is that, among the newly-issued models, it is the only variant with a white dial. The rotating compass bezel is controlled by a dedicated crown at 4 o’clock, making it another feature of its directional bearings. This feature works by holding the watch horizontally and pointing the hour hand towards the sun. This will allow you to set the internal compass bezel accordingly.  The new silver indices of the SPB119 are another notable change from the SARB013, an older, similarly white-dialed Alpinist model that featured gold-colored indices. Comfort is also a priority in this timepiece, as it comes with a black calfskin leather strap and a sturdy, durable deployant clasp. This kind of strap is easier to use and can be secured just by fastening it and expanding the strap’s size accordingly. Like the other new models, the SPB119 also features a sapphire crystal with a magnifier on the exterior for a more readable time display.  For a price of $699 only, the SPB119 provides every wearer a decent and functional watch that has an accuracy of +25 to -15 seconds per day. Powered by the 6R35 caliber movement, it moves automatically with a manual winding capacity and beats at 3Hz with 24 jewels. The 6R35 caliber movement also provides an upgraded power reserve of 70 hours, which is great if you intend to wear the SPB119 for several days.  SPB121 Model What to look for in your Seiko Alpinist SPB121 model: Green dialGold numerals and indicesNATO strapPerfect lug to lug measurementReleased for a price of $659.00, the SPB121 model stood out among the rest because of its unique golden numeral markers placed in a sunburst green dial. It also has minimalistic, simply-styled letterings for its label. The Prospex “X” logo found at the bottom signifies emphasizes its status as part of Seiko’s Prospex collection. An inner rotatable compass ring can also be found at the 4 o’clock position. The watch’s 39.5mm stainless steel case is a great size for all wrists, whether men or women. A lug-to-lug size of 46.4mm is the perfect measurement, carefully balancing the sturdiness and the versatility of the watch. This is a watch you can opt to wear as either a casual dress watch or as a professional watch. The versatile combination of silver, gold, and green colors makes this watch perfect for any attire a wearer could have.  The SPB121 also has a screw-back case with an open window, allowing you to easily view the movement inside. Also, a date magnifier is placed in the watch, along with an upgraded sapphire crystal that is AR-coated. Some collectors prefer to pair this watch with a NATO strap to make it look more sporty. Its 200-meter water resistance allows you to do outdoor activities like swimming and diving without having to worry about the static pressure exerted on the watch.  Who Should Buy These? Anyone who has an admiration for classic, luxurious, and valuable watches would definitely love to wear one of these Seiko Alpinist-inspired timepieces. Though these are made with high-quality materials and upgraded features, they still come with inexpensive prices that are easy for almost any watch collector to afford.  Furthermore, since 1881, Seiko has been a favorite of many watch enthusiasts. Its watches have become the symbol of value and style. Even famous personalities like Kristen Stewart, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Sandra Bullock have shown their appreciation for this brand. For anyone looking to wear the same timepieces as your favorite celebrities, Seiko watches are an affordable and reliable choice. Pre-Owned Buying Tips Hundreds of Seiko watch imitations are sold anywhere, online and in-store. Some are even sold at higher prices with very low quality. As such, we want to help you have your own authentic watch by giving you these tips: Buy from Reliable SellersMake sure that you are buying from a reliable store or seller before making an offer to save yourself from fraud. Watchshopping.com is a reputable store of watches that sells several watch brands, including Seiko. It promises buyers 100% authentic products with safe and secure payment. You can also go to Seiko online communities to check for some other stores that are verified by members. Look for Replacement PartsIf you are buying a Seiko watch, make sure to check its worn parts like the dial, bezel, or hands. Oftentimes, pre-owned watches are already being serviced and replaced with new old stock (NOS) parts. So, before paying the full price, you should determine the age of each part. Verify the Serial NumbersVerifying the serial number (comprised of six digits) means it should match the model number. Engravings on the case, movement, and bracelet should also match with those on authentic Seiko watches. Reference numbers of Seiko watches are commonly found on the caseback bearing the case code and the movement.  2021 Seiko Alpinist Models Available in August 2021, the SPB241J1, SPB243J1, SPB245J1, and the limited edition SJE085J1 will be the latest versions of the Seiko Prospex 1959 Alpinist Re-creation.  First, the SJE085J1 Limited Edition, with only 1,959 available pieces, is one of the most awaited timepieces from the upcoming release. Among the re-created timepieces, it is the only one that is powered by Caliber 6L35 with an accuracy of +15 to -10 seconds per day and 45 hours of power reserve. It embodies the original Seiko Alpinist with a leather strap that sits within a protective cuff band. This watch is smaller and thinner than its predecessors, with measurements of 36.6mm case diameter, a lug-to-lug of 43.8mm, and a thickness of only 11.1mm. It features a stainless steel case material with a box-shaped sapphire crystal for additional durability. The black dial contains silver hands and indices come with the Lumibrite feature that creates a multi-dimensional effect on the surface of the dial.  Seiko has not specified the magnifying feature on the SJE085J1 Limited Edition, but we can be sure that it comes with a date display and stop-seconds function. The watch is also 20-bar water-resistant, allowing it to withstand water pressures up to 200 meters. Unlike the SJE085J1 Limited Edition, the other three models SPB241J1 (white dial), SPB243J1 (black dial), and the SPB245J1 (green dial) are powered by Caliber 6R35 with a 38mm cases diameter and 12.9mm thickness. More differences from the Limited Edition piece include the curved sapphire crystal, a three-fold clasp with a push-button release for the strap, 10 bar water resistance, and a see-through caseback.  Quick History of Seiko Watches If you have wondered where and when did Seiko start as a watch company, it all began in 1881 in Japan. A 21-year old, Kintaro Hattori, braved the big city of Tokyo to open a small shop where he sold and repaired watches and clocks.  After more than a decade, his humble shop grew and was fully established. Following a factory expansion, Hattori’s place of business was later named the ‘Seikosha’, which translates to “exquisite house” or “success house”. The shop-turned-factory marked the beginning of Hattori’s accomplishment as one of the world’s most important manufacturers of timepieces. In the late 1890s, Kintaro Hattori broadened the range of his business, from producing simple wall clocks to innovating a new model of a pocket watch, which he called the “Timekeeper”. This development added to the country’s pride in keeping up with modern technology. Fast forward to 1913, and Seikosha produced Japan’s first-ever wristwatch, The Laurel. This step forward made the brand popular more than ever, pushing it to become a manufacturing force in the horology industry that created hundreds of watches a day.  Seikosha was then rebranded to Seiko in 1924. This was after Seiko released several timepieces internationally that allowed the brand to become synonymous with accuracy and precision, innovation, and refinement.  Recent innovations and development from Seiko include the Seiko Astron GPS Solar watch that was made with a 6-hour chronograph and an energy-saving technology, the Seiko EPD watch that was considered as the world’s first watch with an active matrix system, and the Seiko Spring Dive that was equipped with energy efficiency and friction reduction.  Conclusion Over the years, the Seiko Alpinist has gone through a lot of changes, from its movement, cases, straps, indices, and dials. Despite all these changes, however, it has established and maintained its own identity in the wide world of watches. The re-created Seiko Alpinist watches continue to combine fashion, functionality, and affordable prices, while also providing a variety of styles for everyone to choose from. Can’t get enough of Seiko watches? Check out more of its best-selling watch collections like the Presage and Brightz. If you are looking for another watch guide that could help you in choosing your dream wristwatch, read our watch buying guide articles and get yourself familiarized.  Photo credits: All photos courtesy of Seiko’s official website unless stated below the image.

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  11. Seiko Samurai: A Review on One of Seiko’s Best Diver’s Watches

    Seiko Samurai: A Review on One of Seiko’s Best Diver’s Watches

    Seiko has been in the watchmaking market for several decades now. Even though their timeless expertise paved the way for creating high-quality watches, Seiko, in general, has yet to be considered as a luxury watch brand—with Grand Seiko being an exception. This, in turn, puts Seiko on par with Casio in terms of mass-producing several iconic and affordable wristwatches. But that does not necessarily mean that Seiko does not have a few gems hidden in its sleeves. There is no doubt that Seiko has created a global following due to the reliability and iconic designs of their watches. This popularity has led to several pocket watches and wristwatches that have taken the modern era by storm. One of the many innovative watches that Seiko has produced is the Seiko Prospex Samurai. In this review, we will be discussing what makes the Seiko Prospex Samurai watch one of Seiko’s best diver’s watches in the 21st century.  History of Seiko Prospex Samurai Seiko started as a small watch repair shop in Central Tokyo back in 1881. In 1892, Seiko founder Kintaro Hattori expanded by buying a factory in Tokyo which he named Seikosha. The massive success of the Seikosha, which roughly translates to “exquisite house” or “success house”, marked the start of Seiko becoming a substantial figure in the watchmaking industry. Competing with the prominent Swiss watchmakers, the Japanese watch brand captivated the world with its top-notch watchmaking expertise. This success was further amplified when Kintaro Hattori created the “The Laurel”, Japan’s first-ever wristwatch in 1913. With Seiko’s headstart in cutting-edge horological technology, Kintaro Hattori then went on to produce several more wristwatches under the Seiko brand name. Photo Courtesy of Seiko In 2004, Seiko introduced a promising watch model that embodies all the watchmaking principles of Kintaro Hattori, as well as the accumulated experiences of the brand. The model in question? The Seiko Prospex Samurai. This watch is widely regarded as one of the best diver’s watches Seiko has ever released. Not only does it have the classic bulky size of a regular diver’s watch, but it also has a reliable automatic calibre movement and a 200m water resistance. The first generation of the Seiko Samurai watch was made with both titanium and stainless steel, with later generations being made only in stainless steel. You may be wondering why this particular watch is named “Samurai” of all things. Seiko, like many other watch brands, has been known to name its products in the most abstract way possible. A few examples are the Seiko Monster and the Seiko Turtle. The Seiko Monster got its name due to its size, while the Seiko Turtle has a shape reminiscent of a turtle’s shell. The Seiko Samurai, on the other hand, derives its name from the minute hands of the watch, which are shaped like a sword. This might be confusing to some since a samurai katana is a curved long sword, rather than a regular straight-edged sword. Regardless, it holds up, especially since Seiko has always been rather unpredictable in terms of naming their watches. Impressions At a glance, the Seiko Prospex Samurai may seem like an ordinary diver’s watch. Without knowing the specifics of its name, you might be wondering: what makes this particular watch so special? There are several features that set the Seiko Samurai apart from other Seiko diver’s watches. One of them is the Seiko Samurai’s waffle-textured dial and the sleek stainless steel case. The watch’s sleek sword-shaped minute hand, as well as the unusually-shaped arrowhead hour hand, also serve to distinguish it from other watches. These unique design schemes are what make the Seiko Samurai an ideal diving companion that can also be used outside of the said activity.  Since the Seiko Prospex Samurai was initially a Japan-exclusive watch, not much was known regarding the specifics of the watch other than the name itself and the fact that it is a diver’s watch. However, over the years, it slowly gained the right kind of attention from watch enthusiasts, making this seemingly rare timepiece highly sought-after. The black dial variant is the most common option available in the market. Furthermore, since this was a highly exclusive watch, variations of the Seiko Samurai can be relatively hard to find. Seiko took advantage of the high demand for the Seiko Samurai and released a few limited edition colour variants—one of which is the rare Seiko Samurai Orange Dial SRPC07.  The indications and the AR35 calibre movement might make it seem like the Seiko Samurai series is just like any other dive watch in the market. With the hours, minutes, and seconds hands, as well as the date aperture, anyone would assume that it is just an ordinary watch. But a closer look reveals that the Seiko Samurai actually offers more than it initially seems. Let’s take a look at the specifications of the Seiko Prospex Samurai and how they set it apart from other diver’s watches. Specifications Looking at a Seiko watch for the first time may leave you thinking that there are only minor changes with each watch line. That is perfectly understandable since Seiko has been sporting similar design schemes to stay true to their established identity. A closer look, however, shows us how Seiko manages to create subtle, if not major, changes with each of their staple watches, giving a distinct look to each watch while still emphasizing consistency within the Seiko brand. If you prefer a larger case size, the Seiko Monster will surely meet your needs. If you are looking for a watch with a perfectly round shape and has a sizeable thickness, the Seiko Tuna is a perfect choice. The point is, Seiko watches stay true to their brand, while also making sure that each watch is uniquely suited to meet the user’s needs. Case and Bracelet Initially, the Seiko Prospex Samurai was introduced mostly in titanium, with stainless steel as a secondary option. The titanium versions, however, were later discontinued in 2008. That is why stainless steel variants are the ones that are more easily available in the market. Rest assured, however, that the stainless steel cases and bracelets are easily comparable with titanium materials in terms of durability and shine. The lugs were made smaller to balance out the proportions of the watch and provide maximum comfort on the wrist. On the other hand, the bezel adds more to the design of the whole watch with its engraved diamond shape patterns on the sides. If you look closely, this pattern also resembles the diamond pattern found on the hilt of a katana—a nice detail that stays true to the watch’s namesake. The overall size of the Seiko Samurai is not as bulky as it seems. At 43.8mm in diameter and 13.4mm in thickness, this watch is slightly smaller than your average diver’s watch. Nevertheless, the stainless steel case still provides excellent durability, no matter the size.  Dial The original Seiko Samurai was released with only a black dial with a waffle-like textured pattern. Following that, Seiko released several more variations that include a gradient ocean blue dial that goes from indigo-blue at the top to black at the bottom, and the seemingly rare orange dial. There are a lot of options to choose from when it comes to the colour of the dial alone, but since the discontinuation of the Seiko Samurai series, finding your preferred Seiko Samurai watch may prove to be harder than it seems. Most people resort to buying pre-owned units, while others are still scouring official stores to find the one they are looking for. These dials exude a variety of styles such as sporty, chic, classy, and casual. Nonetheless, the original waffle-pattern textured dial still best represents the simplicity of the Seiko Samurai line. Indications The indications of the Seiko Samurai are minimalistic and focus more on reliability rather than style. A diver’s watch should always be clear and accurate when it comes to timekeeping. Otherwise, it could potentially lead to certain accidents, such as miscalculated decompression stops or running out of oxygen due to the inaccuracy of a watch. That said, the Seiko Samurai provides fairly simple watch functions that allow the user to tell the time as accurately as possible, without the risk of miscalculation. The watch also sports white hour markers and hands, providing maximum legibility even in the dark ocean depths, so telling the time will not pose much of a problem. Furthermore, with the help of the LumiBrite technology, you can easily read the time both in the dark and underwater.  As mentioned before, the minute hands of the watch are shaped like swords. While they do not resemble katanas, when these hands meet each other at a certain time, they do look more reminiscent of a sword when combined. This is a cool detail to take note of. The date aperture is found at the 3 o’clock position. Since it is a diver’s watch, the bezel of the Seiko Samurai can only be rotated counterclockwise. The markers on the bezel are also white, maintaining a consistent design scheme while also allowing for greater legibility. Rather than adding a more few bells and whistles, the straightforward nature of the Seiko Samurai prioritizes function, making it an extremely reliable dive watch that deserves the praise it’s getting. Calibre Movement There are a lot of people who frequently associate Seiko with Casio, mainly because both are Japanese companies. One difference to keep in mind is that Casio very rarely makes automatic watches, and instead produces quartz movement watches. In comparison, Seiko has many automatic movement watches to choose from. The calibre used in the Seiko Samurai is the AR35. This is an automatic calibre movement that allows hand-winding and provides many of the useful functions necessary for a dive watch.  One of the best functions the AR35 offers is the stop-seconds function. This allows the user to adjust the time without having to worry about the seconds hand, ensuring accurate synchronization, right down to the second. This function has existed in the industry for several years now but is still widely used in the horological craft. Another notable feature is the power reserve of the Seiko Samurai. This movement allows the watch to last for approximately 41 hours when not in use. Since it is both a self-winding and manual-winding watch movement, running out of power will not be a problem for the wearer.  A Few Notable Seiko Prospex Samurai Models Seiko Prospex Samurai Automatic Black Dial – SRPB51K1 Starting with the original model, the Seiko Prospex Samurai SRPB51K1 retains the simplicity of the Samurai watches that came before it. With the black waffle-textured dial and minimalistic indications, it is impossible to mistake the watch’s classic design. The watch also sports a 43.8mm stainless steel case and a stainless steel bracelet, ensuring that the durability of the watch remains the same. The bezel has a black and grey colour with a unidirectional movement. The hands and indexes are all coated in LumiBrite, which allows visibility even in the dark or underwater.  Speaking of underwater, all of the Seiko Samurai watches can go up to 200 meters underwater, and the Prospex Samurai SRPB51K1 is no different. This is to be expected, since it is a diver’s watch, and this is indicated on the dial itself. The watch is further equipped with the AR35 calibre movement, which gives it a 41-hour power reserve as well as the stop-seconds function. Overall, nothing can beat the original when it comes to subtlety and simplicity. Seiko Prospex Samurai Automatic Black Dial (Hard Coating) – SRPB55K1 The Seiko Samurai SRPB55K1 offers a similar design as the Samurai SRPB51K1, with a few notable differences. This model is reminiscent of the titanium variant due to the black coating of the case. Rest assured, though, that this watch uses stainless steel for its case, and thus maintains the same durability as other Samurai watches. The bracelet used for the Seiko Samurai SRPB55K1 is silicone instead of stainless steel. Not only does this add more comfort, but the soft exterior also adds more to the style of the watch. The Seiko Samurai SRPB55K1 also retains the familiar black waffle pattern on its dial. However, it offers a different look on both the hands and the indexes. By using a gold-tone lining, the indicators are highlighted without any worry of legibility issues. The markings on the bezel also adopt a gold colour scheme to stay true to the overall design and provide a refined feel to the totality of the watch. Seiko Prospex Samurai Automatic “Save The Ocean” – SRPC93K1 Last on the list is the Seiko Samurai “Save The Ocean” SRPC93K1, a special edition timepiece introduced in 2018. Versions of this edition can be found in both the Seiko Turtle and Seiko Samurai lines as well. This model does not only look good, but it also provides a specific message for everyone in terms of marine conservation.  Much like the rest of the Seiko Samurai models, the Seiko Samurai SRPC93K1 holds the same design, size, and functionalities. The highlight of this watch is its beautiful gradient dial which perfectly captures the ocean depths. The engraved horizontal lines add a texture to the dial that resembles the unending waves of the sea. The black section at the bottom of the dial embodies the unknown depths of the ocean that are yet to be explored. The Seiko Samurai “Save The Ocean” SRPC93K1 is a watch that symbolizes the importance of marine life as well as the beauty of the vast ocean. Seiko Samurai Price Range The best thing about Seiko’s watches is that they are at a very affordable price range. Although Seiko is not considered a luxury brand, the watches are of amazing quality and should be considered for your collection. Seiko Samurai watches do not cost more than a thousand dollars apiece. Indeed, the functionalities and the classic designs of the Seiko Samurai ensure that this is the timepiece that will give you the most bang for your buck. The Seiko Prospex Samurai SRPB51K1 currently costs $469 in the market. Since it features the common design of the Seiko Samurai collection, the price tag for it seems fairly reasonable compared to its fellow watches in the collection. Each model may differ in price, but the usual price range starts from $450 up to $600. Compared to the usual price of Casio watches, the Samurai is undoubtedly more expensive—but for good reason. For only a few hundred dollars more, you can own a dive watch that is equipped with an automatic movement, which is the best choice compared to a quartz watch. It may not be on par with the Rolex Submariner, but it is a great timepiece for those who plan on starting a watch collection. Either way, do not be discouraged about its price being below $1000; the Seiko Samurai is a solid automatic dive watch that offers more than what it is worth. If it is still above your desired budget, you can always rely on pre-owned watches. Depending on the condition, it can be bought for as low as $300—or even lower. Just be sure to find a reliable seller and avoid shady deals online. Final Thoughts The Seiko Prospex Samurai is truly one of Seiko’s most popular dive watches today. Not only does it provide the necessary tools for diving, but it also boasts impressive accuracy and reliability. The AR35 calibre movement exceeds all expectations when it comes to sustaining a diver’s watch while also prioritizing precision.  In addition to that, the Seiko Samurai is also flexible in terms of usage. The bezel can be used when timing recreational activities other than diving. Furthermore, the compact size of this watch makes for a great everyday watch. The various dial colours available are yet another reason for the Seiko Samurai’s popularity. With so many colors to choose from, you can mix them up with any event or activity as you see fit. Whether it’s professional or casual, the Seiko Samurai manages to be the perfect watch for any occasion. Overall, the Seiko Prospex Samurai is a great diver’s watch that is easily on par with most of the top dive watches in the industry. For a very affordable watch, the Seiko Samurai is more than what it is worth—making it the perfect underwater companion for everyone. Looking for the best Seiko timepiece to give to your girlfriend or mother? Take a look at our list of Best Seiko Women’s Watches for some great options. Featured image courtesy of George Thomas from Flickr

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