William McCleary

William McCleary

First Published: December 09, 2018
Following a lengthy stint as an Entertainment Reporter in Hollywood, William focuses on writing for the travel and lifestyle sectors. His clients include Google, Hotels.com, and AccorHotels, specializing in website content, SEO-friendly blog posts and product-marketing copy. He also pens a wide range of feature articles, microcopy and a slew of social media content.
  1. Articles by William McCleary
  2. Affordable Dress Watches Under $1,000

    Affordable Dress Watches Under $1,000

    Who says affordable watches and exquisite dress watches can’t be the same thing? Yes, you can spend big money to put a formal timepiece on your wrist. And there are some amazing dress watches among the upscale offerings. But there are also lots, and lots, of great dress watches with surprisingly accessible price tags. Let’s take a look at some of the finest dress watches. Orient Bambino Version IV Orient is an amazing brand when you’re looking for quality that exceeds its price tag. While the Orient Bambino is the most popular of its automatic offerings, with dozens of models in the line, it is not so easy to decide which is right for you. But consider the Version IV. It wears a little sleeker than many of the other pieces in the line, largely due to its elegant dauphine hands and slim hour markers. You can wear it on a high-polish bracelet or go for a more formal look on leather. Flip it over to find a clear case back to let you see that mechanical movement in motion. All for under $200! Timex Marlin Automatic Another watch brand that’s earned praise for its affordability and quality, Timex makes some really nice dress watches at low prices. The Marlin Automatic (which you can pick up for around $250!) is truly a classic in the traditional sense, both sleek and simple, with an unassuming 40mm stainless steel case that hasn’t changed much since its debut in the 1960s. With understated golden hands and indices, on a fine leather strap this low-cost wonder is ready for any formal occasion. Bulova American Clipper Another fine entry you can pick up for a good price, the American Clipper exudes sophistication way beyond its bargain price. With a 42mm diameter, it wears a bit bigger than many a dress watch, but its minimalist leanings downplay its size to give in an unassuming air, albeit a sophisticated one on an alligator strap. With a 40-hour power reserve, this self-winding wonder is a deal at any price. photo from bulova officialSeiko Cocktail Time Created to capture Tokyo’s ultra-chic nightlife scene, the Seiko Cocktail Time simply oozes urban sophistication. It’s just a shade glitzier than your average dress watch, evidenced by the light-catching sheen of its guilloche sunburst dial. But beyond that somewhat shimmering aspect, it’s a classic dress watch in every way, from its traditional stainless steel case to slender beveled hands and smooth calfskin strap. While a few of the watches in the line dip over the $1,000 line, you can often find them for around $350. Victorinox Swiss Army Men’s Alliance Sure, most of us know that Victorinox is famed for its Swiss Army knives. And they also have a reputation for making some rugged timepieces that could go out in the field with soldiers as well. But among their more refined options, such as the Alliance line, are some pretty stunning timepieces. This dress watch goes for a clean and classic look with a basic black or simple white dial and Arabic numbers. Look closely and, beyond the small date window, you’ll notice unique 24-hour indices that make up the dial’s inner ring. Less formal than other dress offerings, Victorinox puts this watch on a laid-back stitched leather strap, unless you go with a stainless steel bracelet. Hamilton Jazzmaster Thinline Hamilton takes dress watches in the opposite direction — minimalism. A no-nonsense dial has basic Arabic numerals. It keeps things understated in terms of size, with a slim 7mm thickness and 42mm case diameter. With different dial colors and a variety of different straps, it’s also a pretty versatile timepiece. While we doubt you’ll take this to the beach, it is water-resistant up to 50 meters. Tissot Powermatic For fine Swiss craftsmanship at affordable prices, look to Tissot. The Powermatic goes for a more of a casual presentation on its face than other dress watches, with Roman numerals and the traditional Le Locle signature in script, a nod to the Swiss town that sits at the heart of watchmaking heritage. On an alligator strap, this watch takes its casual lean into more formal territory. Flip it over to watch the movement through a display case back. Depending on the model, you have many great options to choose from. Frederique Constant Classic Index Frederique Constant brings us right up to the edge of our $1,000 limit with its Classic Index, a dress watch that you’ll likely cherish for decades. It keeps things classy with an elegant white face and subdued silver hour markers. The hour and minute hands are slim and triangular, giving the watch a cosmopolitan vibe, while the case size keeps things understated with a diameter of 40mm. It’s powered by automatic Swiss movement with a power reserve of 38 hours. So while you can spend a lot of money on fine dress watches, and there are a lot of timepieces out there that are worth the expenditures, you can surely get yourself a great dress watch without breaking the bank.

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  3. Best Mechanical Watches for Men

    Best Mechanical Watches for Men

    To many watch aficionados, the only kind of watch to wear are mechanical watches. But with so many out there, the abundance of choices can be overwhelming. While we can’t go through them all, let’s look at a few of the best mechanical watches to consider. Yes, Quartz is More Accurate Before the quartz fans start screaming, we should get this one out of the way. It is true, quartz watches are slightly more accurate than mechanical watches. While today’s technology means mechanical watches are getting more and more accurate, they will still never be as accurate as their quartz cousins (at least not in our lifetimes). Results vary, but you can expect a good quartz watch to lose only a few seconds a year while a well-made mechanical watch may lose a few seconds per month. But that is a small price to pay for the wonder that is a mechanical watch. Tag Heuer Autavia Isograph If we remember much from the 1980s style it was that things were big and bold. Hair was sprayed high, shoulder pads got ridiculously puffy and punk-inspired ensembles broke norms with shredded style. It was in the 80s that the Tag Heuer Autavia thrived. Discontinued in 1985, the model recently made a triumphant return. As its name suggests, the watch blends the style of race-inspired timepieces with made-for-pilots “aviation” watches. The result is a wonderful hybrid that comes in a carbon composite case that can take one heck of a beating. As it’s antimagnetic, shock resistant, and gravity resistant, it’s durable enough to take anything most men can dish out. The round case wears large at 42mm, but not so big and bulky that it doesn’t dress up nicely on a fine leather strap. Rolex Yacht-Master II Detractors of the classic Rolex Yacht-Master II may say that the watch wears too heavy. And they may have a point. With a diameter of 44mm and a bold angular lug design, it does present large. It’s one of the biggest offerings Rolex has in its repertoire. But most watch lovers will say that’s the beauty of the timepiece. It’s a guy’s guy watch that proudly puts its heft on display. With water resistance up to 100 meters, it’s built tough and designed for the adventurous spirit. That’s not to say it doesn’t have its finer side. Eighteen carat gold hour markers give it an air of sophistication while the instantly recognizable Ring Command bezel gives it a big, bold, blue show that most men would be proud to heft around on their wrists. Longines HydroConquest Automatic Diver You may be aware that the Swatch Group produces Longines timepieces. And Swatch is known for its whimsical watches, with lots of plastic pieces you may get in a variety of colors to add a splash of fun to an everyday outfit. That doesn’t mean you can’t look to them for a fine automatic watch. The Longines HydroConquest is a perfect example of this dichotomy. This is a classic men’s watch, with a bold blue dial, silver-white indices, and a traditional no-nonsense case style, which doesn’t go too big with a 41mm diameter. The result is a masculine piece that doesn’t try to overcompensate. Adding to its old-school aesthetics, the screw-down crown and link bracelet tell the world you’re a traditional man with traditional tastes. View this post on Instagram @longines is releasing an all-black ceramic version of the #hydroconquest (including ceramic dial). 43 mm diameter, L888.3 (ETA A31.L01) #longines #longineshydroconquest #divewatch #watchtime #watchtimemagazine #longinesconquest #longineswatch #longineswatches #uhren #ceramicwatch A post shared by WatchTime (@watchtimemagazine) on Apr 10, 2019 at 8:43am PDT Tudor Black Bay If you are going for all of the hallmarks that traditionally go into a watch for a man — clean lines, form following function and a pedigree that goes back decades — one should not look past the Black Bay. While we first saw the line in 2012, its roots go much deeper, back to Tudor’s foray into dive watches with the Submariner in 1954. Today’s Black Bays, which come in over a dozen varieties, continue that tradition with models like the Black Bay P01. With a 42mm diameter case, it has a manly vibe, that’s softened by a satin stainless steel finish. But this watch was made for men of action. It’s waterproof to 200 meters, has a crown at the four o’clock position to protect it from any bumps the watch may take on its side, and locks down its bezel with a unique hinge system. It’s no surprise this model is based on a design from 1967 intended for divers in the U.S. Navy and given the apt code name “Commando.” Hublot Classic Fusion Ferrari GT Putting this monster on your wrist, with a bold 45mm carbon-fiber case, might draw accusations of overcompensation. Driving a Ferrari might do the same. But for guys who want things big, bold and luxurious, the Classic Fusion Ferrari GT 3D Carbon (also available in titanium and “King Gold”) is a perfect choice. Hublot began its association with Ferrari back in 2011, drawing inspiration from the Gran Turismo racers of the Italian auto legends. This one just screams for attention, with a busy skeletonized dial and subdials that seem to float over the action. The self-winding flyback chronograph’s movement is made up of over 350 parts, all moving in precise unison to create a show worthy of the Ferrari name. Mechanical Watches Conclusion Of course, there are more. Lots more. Most major brands have dozens of mechanical offerings. But if you keep your eyes peeled and mind open, we’re sure you’ll find that perfect mechanical watch to put on your wrist.

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  4. Most Popular Omega Seamaster Models

    Most Popular Omega Seamaster Models

    If you know Omega watches you probably know the Omega Seamaster. One of the longest-running lines in the Swiss watchmaker’s esteemed catalog, it’s also one of the most popular. But which Seamaster models do people love the most? Let’s take a look. Over Seven Decades of Demand The Omega Seamaster made its debut on the world stage in 1957. Since then the Omega Seamaster has been emblematic of the watchmaker’s fascination with the high seas. But its place in the Omega pantheon has always had a hint of uncertainty. On the one hand, many of the watches in the Seamaster line satisfy hardcore undersea enthusiasts. IT has solid depth ratings and helium valves. On the other hand, many of the offerings in the Seamaster collection wear more like nice dress watches that just happen to be water-resistant. It’s made the line interesting and somewhat hard to define. But let’s at least try with a look at some of the most popular Seamaster’s out there. The “James Bond” Seamaster Diver 300m If you’ve seen images of Seamaster’s on Instagram chances are pretty good you’ve come across this classic. Pierce Brosnan famously took 007 from Rolex to Omega in the 1995 movie Goldeneye with a quartz version (Reference 2541.80) that has the instantly recognizable helium escape valve at the ten o’clock position and a wave pattern on its blue dial. The switch made sense as Omega was what officers of Britain’s Royal Navy were actually wearing at the time. Omega later celebrated 20 years with Bond by outfitting Daniel Craig (an Omega ambassador) with a Diver 300m for 2005’s Spectre. His limited edition model has a unique lollipop seconds hand and he wore it in sporty style on a grey-and-black NATO strap. Over the years there have been modifications to the 300m, with some featuring chronograph functions and available in various precious metals. But the watch has stayed true to its original design, and, if the hordes of Omega lovers out there have anything to say about it, it will stay just as popular by not changing with the times. Seamaster Professional Planet Ocean This is another one that owes some of its popularity to celebrities. Actors George Clooney and Tom Hardy have been spotted wearing Planet Oceans, as has Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps. Daniel Craig wears one both off-screen and he sported one in the opening of the Bond film Casino Royale. With a debut in 2005, the Planet Ocean has less history than its predecessor, the Diver 300m, but does offer a modern message from Omega about its commitment to ecologically sound oceans. The Seamaster Planet Ocean 600M Diver 43.5mm, arguably one of the most popular entries in the already popular line, doubles its predecessor’s water resistance with a rating of up to 600 meters (as you may have guessed by its name). The Planet Ocean is also a true dive watch with a helium release valve, co-axial movement, and carbon case. If we’re judging by Instagram, orange seems by far to be the most popular color. Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Here’s where we get into something of a nebulous area with Seamasters and their dive-watch credentials. True, the Aqua Terra was built for diving. As most amateur dives won’t take you even close to the watch’s 150-meter depth rating, it covers most underwater needs. But the watch has a dressy side it’s not shy to display. Fitted on a fine leather strap this watch feels more at home in an upscale bistro than along the Great Barrier Reef. With clean, simple case lines and an uncluttered dial, the Aqua Terra exudes a more cosmopolitan vibe than your average tool watch. It’s also well-suited for land as a travel watch, with a 24-hour GMT hand for tracking different time zones. Both its versatility and its ability to dress up lends to its popularity. We must give another nod to an endorsement from James Bond. Daniel Craig dons an Aqua Terra in Skyfall, but in lieu of scuba gear, he fittingly pairs the watch with a designer suit. A 300 in Gold and Green The Omega Seamaster 300 has seen its share of variety, from dial colors to straps, bracelets, and complications. One of the most noteworthy models, and most eye-catching, is a Seamaster 300 in vivid green and yellow gold. The color combination is almost a parody of vintage style. But just almost as the deep green malachite dial and matching ceramic bezel blend perfectly with the gleaming 18K yellow gold case and hands. It dresses up impressively on either a link bracelet or green alligator strap and, in truth, belongs nowhere near the deep sea. The Great Bullhead Divide This one has both its rabid fans and its naysaying detractors. And it needs some context to be understood. Omega flowed with the unconventional times and created a watch that stood in defiance of round-case timepieces. The Bullhead’s bold asymmetrical case made it an instant standout, as did its face with chronograph dials in the unusual 12 and 6 o’clock positions. Wearing one today is an unapologetic homage to the hazy days of the 70s and while extremely popular, not for every Omega lover. So you may be on the side of the majority and favor something from the Diver 300 offerings. Or you may stand apart from the fray and proudly wear an unconventional Bullhead. However you choose, there is a popular Omega Seamaster waiting for you.

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  5. Automatic Watches vs. Quartz Watches

    Automatic Watches vs. Quartz Watches

    You’ve just started shopping for a watch and are facing the inevitable question, how to choose between automatic watches and quartz-powered timepieces. Let’s look at the merits of each and how they stack up against each other. Quartz v. Automatic: Overall Impressions Before getting into fine details of watch movements, let’s look at the general reasons people choose either quartz or automatic watches. Quartz is usually less expensive, more accurate and requires less maintenance. Are you sold on a quartz watch already? Before you answer, consider the mechanical watch’s craftsmanship, heritage, and that this thing you wear is not just a collection of silicon microchips like all of your other devices. No, you will not hear the sounds of buzzes and beeps that have no place in the natural world with a mechanical watch. Instead, you have a tactile, functioning, real-world mechanism that you can see, hear and even feel at work. What is Quartz Movement? Let’s take a quick peek back in time, back to the late 1960s in Japan. Seiko was (and still is) the leader in wristwatches on the island nation. On Christmas Day 1969, Seiko released the quartz-powered Astron and the watch world immediately knew this was a seismic shift that would affect them for the foreseeable future. This game-changing nature of quartz movement was not lost to traditional Swiss watchmakers, who were soon to follow. In the 1970s we saw the Rolex Datejust Oysterquartz, which ended its run in 2001. Today one of these quartz Rolexes fetches a fine price at auction. Another Swiss entry from the 70s, the IWC Da Vinci boasted the first fully Swiss-made quartz movement, and if you can come across a vintage Patek Philippe 3587 quartz watch, be prepared to shell out around $30,000 bucks. While top Swiss watchmakers never totally sided with quartz over mechanical movement, their rapid acquiescence was an unquestionable acknowledgment of the power of quartz. So How Does Quartz work? The simplicity of quartz technology is its brilliance. A conventional battery produces a small electric signal that’s sent to a piece of quartz, which is a piezoelectric material. That just means the quartz can hold and transfer electric voltage. Quartz also vibrates at a precise frequency of 32,768 times per second, creating a signal that’s so exact you can (pardon the cliché) set your watch to it. So Seiko decided they would use this reliable timing element to power and regulate its watches. Pluses of Quartz Movement Lasting Power. If you’ve got a quartz watch from a well-established watchmaker, brands like Casio and Seiko, you’ve got some serious durability under the hood. Batteries can last up to five years before needing to get replaced. That’s for basic watch functions. When you get into features like dual readouts with LED screens alongside traditional hands, lots of illumination or stopwatch features, the battery can wear down sooner. Cost Less. This is generally true. Quartz watches are usually cheaper to produce and come with lower retail price tags. But there are exceptions. A TAG Heuer Formula 1, which has battery-powered quartz movement, will cost you north of $1,000 (though, true, a TAG Heuer Carrera with automatic movement can cost triple that). An Omega Speedmaster Skywalker X-33, which features traditional hands and an LCD readout on its quartz-powered face, can go for up to five grand. But you also have top brands such as Braun, Bulova, Tissot, and Hamilton that offer solid quartz watches in the mid-$300 range. Is Quartz More Accurate? The short answer is yes. Experts can argue by how much but in general, a quality quartz watch will only lose about 20 seconds per month. A good automatic, even a high-end Swiss offering, is apt to lose a few minutes each month. Why is Mechanical Movement Such a Big Deal? There are purists who will only wear mechanical movement, automatic or manual. Powered by mainsprings just like the world’s first clocks in the 17th century, mechanical movement uses the ever-diminishing power of a wound spring to drive gears. That’s it! It sounds so simple and yet watchmakers have been honing, experimenting and perfecting this simple concept for centuries. That tradition is what goes into a mechanical watch and that’s what their wearers appreciate. The downside of mechanical? Well, they have to be wound for one. Automatic watches takes care of most of that, with a rotating weight to use the movements of the wearer to wind the spring. But we are still talking about wear and tear here, metal twisting and turning on metal, and that will wear down eventually. But to see that delicate ballet of gears whirl away, each playing an individual role for a unified purpose, well, it’s a thing of beauty to many watch lovers. There’s also the beauty of fluid movement on the face to consider. With a few exceptions, the Seiko Spring Drive being one of them, quartz watches have second hands that have the more rigid “tick-tick” motion, moving once per second with the steady beat produced by the crystal. Automatic movement, conversely, features hand movements that are sweeping, smooth, and many would say, a thing of pure art. It’s why they’ll never go quartz. But the Masses Have Spoken Most of the watches out there in the world (and we’re talking over 90%) are quartz watches. There’s little question that for affordability, longevity, and accuracy most folks want a quartz watch. So choose automatic watches for the tradition and art of engineering or go with quartz for something less design-driven but more practical. Just go with a good brand and you should have a watch worthy of your weighing the question of automatic versus quartz.

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  6. How to Use a GMT Watch

    How to Use a GMT Watch

    Thinking about getting a GMT watch but like to know a little more about them before you make the purchase? Well, let’s take a look at these intriguing timepieces that track separate time zones. You’ve probably heard of the famed Rolex GMT-Master and GMT-Master II. You probably know that GMT means Greenwich Mean Time. And you also probably know that GMT has something to do with a time-zone line somewhere in England. For many of us, that’s the extent of our knowledge of GMT (and we’re fine with that!). But, then again, there are these things called GMT watches and they are, well, kind of awesome. They’re not hard to figure out and pretty useful when you do get a handle on how they function. How Does GMT Work? Well, basically, the watch has an extra hand that points to Greenwich Mean Time. At least that’s where we start as a reference. But rather than the 12-hour rotations of most regular hour hands on watches, the GMT hand references 24-hour markers. So, in other words, the GMT hand goes around once a day independent of the watch’s usual hour and seconds hands. The GMT watch hand is often an arrow, often colored red, and varying in shape from the regular hands to avoid any confusion. It sounds simple enough! But Then There’s the Bezel Adding to functionality (or confusion depending on your point of view), a rotating bezel can be used to track another time zone. How? Well, imagine you are in Greenwich, England. The tea is strong, the Yorkshire pudding flaky, it’s midnight and the GMT hand points to zero on your bezel. You’re taking a flight to New York City, where its five hours earlier. Click your bezel clockwise five marks and you’re now tracking time in the Big Apple. As all the world’s time zones use Greenwich as a reference, you can do this with any location. So You’re Not a Jetsetter? No, probably not. If you’re like most of us you’re not on and off planes all the time, constantly needing to reset to local time. You have a job, a family, a life and they don’t usually include red-eye flights to far-flung corners of the world. So how does a GMT watch help you then? If you work remotely with people from across the world, if your company has a satellite office on another coast, chances are it’s a good idea to have an awareness of time in other places. A GMT watch is an easy maintenance-free way to always have other time zones in your consciousness. Got far-away family? It’s a good idea to know you’re not calling them during dinner time. Got a deadline, an hour in which work has to be done? Just set the GMT hand however much time you have left back from zero and when that hand points straight up your time is also up. How Does it Work for You? So we’ve looked at the what, the functions, the uses, the overall usability. Now let’s consider the why. Why would you consider buying a GMT watch and how would you wear it in practicality? For the prestige. Owning a watch that easily tracks different time zones isn’t just about usefulness. And heck, chances are you’re going to check time zone info on your phone as soon as you land and pass through free airport WiFi on the way to baggage claim. But the GMT watch says something about you. It proudly proclaims to all that you are a citizen of the world, you have knowledge of, and experience in, parts across the globe. You may be at home right now, but your watch has one eye on the local time in London and the other ready to calculate touch-down time in Shanghai. Because it’s not your phone! Yes, we know you probably won’t pass up the chance to use your phone as a watch, passing WiFi in the airport or any other hotspots for that matter. That doesn’t make it right. Or at least the best way to go about things. Just about anyone can (and does) pull out their phone for info, soon lost in the ever-enticing digital landscape, goading you to check that message, consider those likes, respond to every text no matter how banal. Now contrast that with a cool quick glance at your exquisite watch. You’ll notice the difference in how you feel, and others will take note of your sophisticated move as well. For the style. Watch aficionados will go on and on (and rightly so) about watch movements. And when it comes to a GMT watch, they’ll totally geek out on its functions. But for most of us, watches are style statements. We focus on shape, dial colors, straps (Dressy leather? Go commando with NATO? All-biz bracelet?). You choose a fine GMT watch because of how it looks, because it complements the way you dress, because it’s a piece that exemplifies how you see yourself. And, in turn, how the world sees you. Leave the gears to the geeks, you want something cool on your wrist. GMT Watch Conclusion So whether you’re a frequent business traveler or more of a cubicle creature, from checking the stock market bell to checking in on grandma, maybe a GMT watch is the right way for you to track multiple spots with one glance at your watch.

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  7. TAG Heuer Monaco 2009-2019 Limited Edition

    TAG Heuer Monaco 2009-2019 Limited Edition

    The TAG Heuer Monaco celebrated its 50th year in 2019 with a whole lot of fanfare. At a Shanghai gala, brand ambassador’s Li Yifeng and Cara Delevingne introduced us to a limited edition set that commemorates the last decade of the famous watch. But first, let’s get up to speed on the Monaco’s heritage before we say hello to the new entries. It’s That Square One Surely that’s how the TAG Heuer Monaco has been described to the uninitiated over the decades. It’s arguably the world’s most recognizable square watch, so it wouldn’t be a stretch seeing it that way. Or, you may have heard it referred to as that watch with the “robot face.” In truth, the hands at the 10:00 position do make “eyebrows” over subdial “eyes” that, yeah, kind of look like a robot staring at you in a judgmental robot-like way. Still as Cool as Steve There may be no more an iconic image of an actor and his trusted timepiece than Steve McQueen in the 1971 Formula One flick Le Mans. He sported the then-modern watch in the movie. It felt real and fitting because it was both. McQueen famously embodied his parts and was a hands-on guy who loved to drive race cars really fast. McQueen’s Heuer (the TAG part came along later) was selected because that was the brand real race car drivers wore. All these years later, collectors are still after models with blue-and-white dials like McQueen wore in the movie. But Much More than McQueen What the watch set out to do was novel, then and arguably even now. Heuer wanted to create a chronograph that functioned as a stopwatch with no need for winding. Today these automatic chronographs are common but that wasn’t the case in the 60s when fitting the parts for both automatic movement and a chronograph into a watch case seemed impossible. But Heuer did it with Caliber 11! Seiko was also working on the problem and released a similar movement in Japan soon after. But Monaco had crossed the finish line first and will forever be remembered for its old school chronograph creds. Let’s Look at Those Limited Editions Looks like fifth time’s the charm for the Tag Heuer Monaco, which has seen tribute editions that honor the designs from the 70s, 80s, 90s, and 2000s. Now we look to the 2009-2019 period to complete five decades worth of Monaco design elements. Unlike past entries, which went heavy on the retro-racing style, the final round keeps things modern and cosmopolitan, even leaning to the minimalist. But before you cry foul, that we’ve gotten too far from McQueen’s eye-grabbing racing stripes, let’s see how they pay homage to racing history with a practical eye on style in the modern world. So we have sandblasted stainless steel cases with high polish finishes that would be at home in any dress-casual situation — sleek, cosmopolitan, confident. Offsetting the natural rigidity of a square case, the crown and pushers are unconventionally spaced to the left and right as they were on the iconic original in 1969. Sleek sunray dials bring the look back to present time with some modern sheen. Look closely and you’ll notice the dial’s “Heuer” logo is a throwback to the pre-TAG days. The contemporary updates continue with Super-LumiNova on the hands and indices to light the timepiece up. Inside the watch case, you’ll find that the now-famous self-winding chronograph Caliber 11 (that was a breakthrough all those years ago) still powers the watch. But now it’s got a 40-hour power reserve. In keeping with the Formula One motif, calfskin straps have race-inspired perforations and contrast stitching. A Few Final Honors TAG Heuer is celebrating the golden anniversary of Tag Heuer Monaco in a few other notable ways. Monaco Heuer 02. We’re seeing the launch of the Monaco Heuer 02! It clearly draws design inspiration from the watch’s time in the 70s. Its racing past is honored by the addition of a second indicator at the six o’clock position. While the PVD sunray dial keeps things modern and sleek in conjunction with silver opaline accents. Unlike classic Calibre 11 designs, the crown and pushers share space on the same side of the case, which houses an impressive 80-hour power reserve. Monaco Calibre 12 Final Edition. A limited run of the Monaco Calibre 12 Final Edition is also rolling out to commemorate 50 years of the iconic watch. Monaco devotees will know that the Calibre 12 was something of a game-changer. It flipped the crown from its lonely spot on the left to between the pushers on the right side of the case. This gave the watch a sleeker and a more conventional look and increased its versatility and hence its popularity. The latest entry has a subtle grey brushed ruthenium dial that oozes sophistication when paired with a black alligator strap. These final 1,000 pieces end the glorious run of the Calibre 12. Sure, legions of TAG Heuer Monaco fans are likely going after the small number of limited-edition pieces that are available. And if you’ve got the luck and the means, we hope on of these signature watches will be on your wrist. If not, just look around. With 50 years of history and heritage, there are a whole lot of Monaco’s out there just waiting to hit the road again.

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  8. A Closer Look at the Grand Seiko Godzilla Watch

    A Closer Look at the Grand Seiko Godzilla Watch

    We’ve got some Godzilla news — the Grand Seiko Godzilla watches are out and available for purchase! Seiko and Grand Seiko outlets are currently selling a 650-piece run of the individually numbered Grand Seiko Godzilla 65th Anniversary Limited Editions. Let’s take a look at this truly unique offering. It Started with Destruction Some serious destruction. And with this watch, Grand Seiko Godzilla brings us a city-destroying monster tale that’s more than six decades in the making. Avid fans of creature features know that Godzilla first stomped onto the silver screen in 1954. In that fateful year, the raging beast tore through the streets of Tokyo and toppled one of the city’s famed landmarks. The Seiko Clock Tower that rises above its flagship Wako store. grand-seiko official websiteThe Japanese watchmakers would never forget the carnage. No one would! To commemorate that pivotal silver-screen moment, Grand Seiko Godzilla unleashes its homage to the cinema’s most-famous prehistoric sea monster (no, he’s not a mutated dinosaur!). Echoes of the Atomic Age  – Grand Seiko Godzilla The watch delves deep into Japanese culture in some subtle ways. It embodies the spirit of “kaiju,” loosely translated to mean “strange monster.” It’s a theme we’ve seen repeated in almost innumerable ways in Japanese art and cinema. One with a dark history that harkens back to Japan’s weathering of devastating nuclear attacks during World War 2. While Godzilla was the first “kaiju,” he was followed by equally destructive beasts such as Mothra, Rodan, and Gamera. Grand Seiko captures this monster madness with a watch that’s big and bold. It measures at 44.5mm and made of high-grade titanium. Titanium that might just be able to withstand Godzilla’s famed atomic breath. Short faceted lugs and a trim sapphire bezel keep the case design sporty. Grand Seiko Godzilla, A Field of Fiery Crimson The red theme is immediately eye-catching. Dark red. A deep-hued crimson with echoes of bold burgundy to capture the essence of Godzilla’s fiery rage. A vivid red counterweight on the seconds hand pops with blood-red vibrancy. The Grand Seiko Godzilla dial is also an ode to the monster’s power. It’s a deep burgundy with a sunray finish that mimics the destructive heat rays that fly from the creature’s mouth. Twist the dial in the light and watch shades of dark go light. And vice versa, creating a moveable color palette that gives the watch a real feel of fluidity. The hour markers, hands and bezel numbers are coated with Seiko’s signature Lumibriute that positively glows in low light. Protecting the face from any unwanted glare, an anti-reflective dual-curved sapphire crystal stands guard over the dial. Monster Mayhem on the Back Grand-Seiko official websiteWhile the dial offers a somewhat subtle homage to Godzilla, the back is more in-your-face with monster-movie lore. It’s here we see an illustration of Godzilla wreaking havoc on the Wako building just as he did in the 1954 film. The artwork comes from an esteemed member of the Godzilla movie world, Japanese artist, and special effects master Shinji Higuchi. He’s been an integral part of the Godzilla Movie Universe since the 1990s and most recently created movie magic for the 2016 film Shin Godzilla. Grand Seiko aficionados will undoubtedly draw a connection to the traditional Grand Seiko Lion. It’s an iconic and longtime image that’s emblazoned many a case back of Grand Seiko watches. Here, Godzilla strikes a fierce pose that’s similar to that of Grand Seiko’s usual King of the Jungle. Of course, Godzilla would win in a battle between the two. Strap on Some Monster Skin The sharkskin strap is arguably the most striking aspect of the watch. Undoubtedly the mind conjures up images of Godzilla’s rippled hide. And a field of asymmetrical shapes that calls to mind the craggy husk that protects Godzilla from the bullets, bombs, and missiles armed forces throw his way. But in fairness, we should note that these military assaults may be a bit much. After all, Godzilla is an omnivore who doesn’t eat people. If you think about it, he’s at heart a good guy who has actually fought to save humanity from other beasts in a few of the films. Getting Inside the Grand Seiko Godzilla Beyond celebrating its 65 years with Godzilla, Seiko is also marking 20 years with its revolutionary Spring Drive. While the movement was conceived in 1977, it wasn’t until 1999 that Seiko mass-produced the quartz-signal movement that’s accurate up to ten seconds a month. On the limited-edition Godzilla offering, the 72-hour power reserve is gauged by a small indicator at the dial’s eight-o’clock position. With more than 30 feature films spanning over six decades, plus TV, video games, and comics, Godzilla has racked up legions of fans over the years. So surely these limited edition watches will go quickly. But if you are one of the lucky few, maybe you can snag a Grand Seiko Godzilla watch and wear a piece of monster-movie history on your wrist.

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  9. Richard Mille to Daniel Wellington, Odell Beckham Jr’s Watch Collection

    Richard Mille to Daniel Wellington, Odell Beckham Jr’s Watch Collection

    We should really talk about Odell Beckham Jr., Richard Mille, and Daniel Wellington, because… well, it’s a little complicated. So let’s delve into what the football superstar and these watch brands have gotten themselves into. Richard Mille Gets Time on the Field  Earlier this year, the never-shy Cleveland Browns wide receiver took to the field against the Tennessee Titans wearing an eye-catching orange-and-black Richard Mille RM 11-03 McLaren. A few things were odd about that move. First, it’s a violation of NFL rules and Beckham surely knew he’d be looking at a fine. Okay, he’s got a $16.75 million salary deal so he’s probably not going to sweat a few bucks over some uniform violation. And the bright orange timepiece matched the colors of his uniform, so maybe the choice made sense. What follows didn’t make as much sense…at least not at first glance. That Richard Mille RM 11-03 has a price tag of just under $200,000. It’s an automatic fly back chronograph and it made a big impression when it was unveiled at last year’s Geneva Auto Show. But Odell made a seemingly offhand, and somewhat derogatory, comment that the watch was just “plastic.” But it’s not. It’s made of a highly durable mix of Orange Quartz TPT and Carbon TPT. Unless this longtime watch lover suddenly can’t tell the difference between plastic and a high-end carbon composite, this is a little weird. View this post on Instagram “My haters cant even get subliminal attention…” A post shared by Odell Beckham Jr (@obj) on Jul 6, 2019 at 3:32pm PDT It Gets Better for Odell Beckham Jr. Then Beckham went even bigger with a Richard Mille in a high-profile setting. This time it was during warm-ups against the New York Jets. He was spotted wearing a Richard Mille RM 56-01. That skeletonize tourbillon with a sapphire case costs almost two million bucks! It was one of only five that were produced in 2013, when Beckham was a college player. But, as keen observers were quick to point out, he was wearing a fake. Reporters asked about the watch after the game and he oddly replied, “I think Daniel Wellington might be a better watch than these.” Okay, more curious still. A few days later, things started to make more sense when Daniel Wellington announced on Instagram that Odell was their latest brand ambassador, joining such stars as Hailey Bieber, Chinese singer Lay Zhang, soccer star Paulo Dybala and Bollywood actors Radhika Apte and Ayushmann Khurrana. So we can guess one of two things happened: 1) Beckham used Richard Mille to covertly drum up publicity for his new gig at Daniel Wellington, or 2) Wellington saw the publicity as their chance to move in and nab him as their ambassador. Either way, Richard Mille seems left out on the sideline. Blinged-Out with Breitling and Rolex There was a time, and not too long ago, that Odell Beckham Jr.’s love of luxury watches wasn’t so complicated. Soon after he signed on to play for the New York Giants in 2014 he treated himself to a custom-made Breitling chronograph. He’s one of the most fashion-forward players in the league. So it’s no wonder his luxury timepiece had a diamond-encrusted bezel and a nearly blinding diamond-studded dial. He celebrated the watch on his Instagram account with the quote, “We all have the same 24 hrs in a day. It’s how we use them that makes all the difference… #blessed.” View this post on Instagram On ? A post shared by Odell Beckham Jr (@obj) on Jul 18, 2016 at 5:39am PDT Diamonds seem to be a thing with Beckham, who got attention at last year’s Vanity Fair Oscar party for wearing a heap of diamond chains over his designer suit. He’s partial to sporting Louis Vuitton suits with sneakers and almost always flashes some ice. So it’s no surprise that his go-to Rolex Day-Date is also a diamond-encrusted gem. Odell Beckham Jr. has been spotted on red carpets wearing the glittering timepiece and has also shared images of this fave on Instagram. What’s Next for Odell Beckham Jr. and Wellington? It seems that Odell is all in on his burgeoning love affair with Daniel Wellington watches. He’s joined forces with fellow ambassadors Paulo Dybala and Hailey Bieber to spearhead the Swedish watchmaker’s launch of its first-ever linked bracelet timepieces. Until recently, Wellington’s minimalist offerings only came on fabric, leather or mesh straps. Under the Iconic Link banner, they’re offering the same no-nonsense style with the watch faces but have beefed up the bracelets with three-piece solid stainless steel links. Their rose-gold offering mixes copper with 23-carat gold bar and represents a monumental first for the upstart watchmakers. View this post on Instagram It’s time for y’all to stop watchin me so close…. @danielwellington A post shared by Odell Beckham Jr (@obj) on Sep 24, 2019 at 10:34am PDT Let’s be honest. You may not get your hands on a diamond-encrusted Breitlings or Rolexes like Odell. You probably don’t have an extra 200 grand lying around to sport an exclusive and authentic Richard Mille. But Daniel Wellingtons are well within the reach of the average consumer and a great way to put some of Odell’s unique style on your wrist!

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  10. What Is a Ring Clock?

    What Is a Ring Clock?

    Call it a ring clock, call it a watch ring, either way, it’s an amazing way to tell time on your finger. Let’s take a look at this unique type of timepiece and why you just might want to slip one on your hand. The Future? Some say we are looking at the natural evolution of timepieces with a ring clock. What started with pocket watches later went to the wrist and now we’re simply progressing to a more natural state with a ring clock. But will they ever replace wristwatches? Well, many thought watches would go the way of the dinosaurs with the invention of cellphones. Some asked, “Who needs a watch when you already carry a device that tells time?” Of course, that didn’t happen. That’s because watches are much more than simple time-telling devices. They’re expressions of personal style, homages to engineering marvels and, at their best, stunning works of art. Are Ring Clocks Jewelry? Source: RingclockThat depends on how you look at it. Watches face the same quandary. For many, antique pocket watches are considered jewelry. So are high-end wristwatches, especially if they’re adorned with precious stones. But most don’t put entry-level watches into the category of jewelry. Just try ensuring your Casio calculator watch as jewelry and see how long your insurance broker laughs! But it’s hard to argue that a ring is anything but jewelry, a few exceptions aside, say Batman’s Lantern ring or that pesky One Ring from Lord of the Rings. But for mere mortals and non-caped crusaders, if you slip a ring on your finger, you’re wearing jewelry. So, in that sense, yes, a ring watch is a piece of jewelry, albeit one with a function. How Do They Work? That problem took some serious sorting out. In an unusual way. Nearly a decade ago a proposition was posed by CGSociety, a group that seeks to “inspire, empower, and engage artists.” The challenge, dubbed Moving Innovation, was to create a new visualization for an existing product that didn’t exist presently but likely would in the next ten years. Hungarian inventor Gusztav Szikszai accepted the challenge and set his mind on marrying a ring and a watch. The result is a (yes, admittedly clunky) stainless steel loop with inner and outer rings. The outer ring is split into three bands: one with dots that count seconds, one with minute markers and one with 24-hour markers. View this post on Instagram El anillo futurista que da la hora, #ringclock no se pierdan mi vídeo, link en mi biografía A post shared by Tecnofanatico (@tecnofanatico) on May 4, 2018 at 6:49am PDT Slip on a Light Show! So we have all of the ingredients of time telling, but no hands to point to the hour and minute markers. Well, just pop that ring onto your finger, give it a spin, and watch that thing light up like the dashboard of the Millennium Falcon! LED lights, in blue, white, red or orange, are positioned at the markers and illuminate to signify the hour, minute and the ticking away of seconds. But don’t worry that you’ll be stuck with this glowing thing on your finger all day, which might get you some odd looks at the office or on the street. Instead, the light show only lasts for fifteen seconds and you’ll have to re-spin to show the time again. What seems like a simple function, lights at the minute and hour markers, is actually a small wonder (pun intended) of microelectronic engineering. Szikszai teamed with Hungarian engineers to create a curved ultrathin rechargeable lithium-polymer battery and likewise rounded circuitry that could fit inside the narrow stainless steel casing. How Does it Hold Up in Use? Pretty darn good by most accounts! When it comes to battery life, a two-hour charge should last a week, that’s if you are lighting it up 50 times a day. As for constant use, it’ll run for about two hours before needing a refresh on the wireless charger pad. Though the 8mAh battery does lean to the more delicate side, so letting the ring charge continuously for days on end will drain the life out of the little guy. However, with responsible two-hour charging sessions, the battery should last for three years. Drawback alert: the battery isn’t replaceable. The casing is made of sturdier stuff. High-grade surgical stainless steel is designed to take any bumps, bruises and scratch-causing punishment your hands may see out there in the world. Don’t worry about getting the ring watch wet as it’s water-resistant up to 30 meters, so showering, swimming, and unexpected rainfall are just fine. As one size never fits all when it comes to rings, the ring clock is available in a variety of sizes, 18 to be exact, ranging from an inside circumference of 53.1mm for those with delicate digits to 74.8mm for some big meaty hands. Not sure of your ring size? No worries. After you order, Ringclock will send you plastic sizers to test out and know what size is best for you before shipping the real deal. The ring clock also comes in ten different styles, including silver, Black PVD, Gold PVD, and Rose Gold. And what about the price? To be honest, it’s not the cheapest gadget out there. Putting one of these things on your finger will cost you about $350. That’s about what a new Orient Bambino or a good Casio G-Shock might set you back. Ring Clock Conclusion So, are you convinced yet? Are you ready to put your watch on the shelf and start sporting a ring clock? Maybe you’ll want to wear both. Maybe you’ll just wait to see how this whole ring clock thing plays out before getting on board. Just know that when you’re ready to put a timepiece on your finger, there’s a ring watch waiting to light up just for you.

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  11. Rolex Yacht-Master Close Up

    Rolex Yacht-Master Close Up

    Both the Rolex Yacht-Master and its successor the Rolex Yacht-Master II have captured the untamed spirit of the sea and the imaginations of watch lovers across the globe. Let’s take a deep dive into what makes these exclusive timepieces such enduring successes. First, a look back. Not too far. We just need to ease the time-machine shifter into reverse for a quick trip back to 1992. Bill Clinton was elected U.S. President; Wayne’s World was a box-office smash and a little-known band named Nirvana swerved the music scene away from 80s hair bands to something called “grunge.” It was in this same year that Rolex dropped the very first Yacht-Master. Rolex Needed a New Groove The watch was a big deal at the time (as it is today). Rolex hadn’t much altered the design of its Sea-Dweller, the Yacht-Master’s nautical-themed predecessor, in more than two decades. Unsurprisingly, the shift came along when Patrick Heiniger took the helm of the company from his father. The new boss was intent on making some changes that would keep Rolex current. So the best parts of their tried-and-true Submariners and Rolex Daytona’s were combined with a few new cutting-edge design elements and the Yacht-Master was born. The first model, offered in the Oyster Perpetual line, was somewhat similar to the Submariner with 3135 movement. But it had an 18 karat gold case, etched bezel inserts, large indices and hands, and, perhaps most fittingly, was water-resistant up to 100 meters. At 40mm, this freshman Yacht-Master was big, bold and an instant success. Just two years later Rolex scaled back the Yacht-Master’s size with a 35mm edition for men with slimmer wrists and a 29mm offering aimed at women, along with an updated version of the 40mm watch. These new editions featured striking blue sunray dials that would go on to be regarded as hallmarks in the line. As we neared the end of the 20th century Rolex looked to change with the times. And change was in the air in 1999. Maybe it was Y2K fears, maybe because the global population passed six billion or possibly because Ricky Martin was daring us to start “Livin’ la Vida Loca.” We may never know what inspired Rolex to move from gold to a new mix of platinum and steel called “Rolesium.” We do know it was a somewhat controversial move, with both lovers and detractors of the rare-metal mix. Yacht-Master Spawns a Sequel 2007 was a big year for sequels (and threequels!). Hollywood gave us Hostel 2, Spider-Man 3, Rush Hour 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean’s 13 and Halloween 9. So it seems only fitting that Rolex would drop the Yacht-Master ii amid this retread mania. The watch was (and is!) bold in many ways, from its hefty 44mm size to its striking blue bezel, set against the meeting of two metals known as “Rolesor,” mixing steel with yellow and white gold. It’s an eye-catching combo that’s made the timepiece instantly recognizable and a favorite of watch aficionados worldwide. Today’s Yacht-Masters run the gamut of variations. Go dressy with a link bracelet or sporty with a rubber strap. Dials span from midnight black and slate grey to powder white and shimmering bronze. Feel like bringing some bling with diamond accents? No problem, Rolex has a Yacht-Master for that too! These variations, the Yacht-Master’s timeless elegance, and the quality of fine Swiss watchmaking have put the timepiece in the spotlight and on some seriously trendy wrists. Celebrities Sport the Yacht-Masters Ellen DeGeneres. Demonstrating that big luxe watches aren’t just for men, Ellen has been spotted wearing an 18k Everose gold Yacht-Master. Her classic model has a Cerachrom bezel, matte black dial and she likes the watch best on a sporty black rubber strap. Conor McGregor. Never shy about flashing some seriously nice watches, UFC champ McGregor’s go-to Yacht-Master ii is a brazen 44mm yellow-gold model with that ever-popular Ring Command bezel in vibrant blue. David Beckham. You can say the same for David Beckham and his yellow-gold Yacht-Master ii. But McGregor and Beckham don’t really have the same watch. With Rolex’s unique use of natural materials, none of their signature mother-of-pearl dials is exactly the same. Mark Wahlberg. The movie star takes a different tact with his 40mm Yacht-Master in Everose Rolesor with a mix of Oystersteel and rose gold. While the precious metals give it a dressed-up feel, the cool chocolate dial creates a more casual vibe that makes the watch quite versatile. Roger Federer. Of course, the “James Bond” of tennis keeps things cool and sophisticated with his Yacht-Master ii, a Rolesium model with a rotatable platinum bezel and an 18k white gold case. You may not be a tennis star, movie star or have the ability to take down a UFC fighter with a roundhouse kick (or maybe you do). Either way, you can still sport some star style with a nautical lean by slipping on a fine Rolex Yacht-Master.

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